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Racial Gap

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1989
In response to "Socially, Color Line Is Still Drawn in Nation's Capital," Part I, Jan. 17: Why is it called apartheid when we talk about it happening in South Africa and apartness when we talk about racial divisions in "Chocolate City," the capital of the United States? And what, exactly, is the difference? Do we accept a lame explanation, such as voluntary versus involuntary segregation because many black Americans supposedly say they choose not to mingle with whites?
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OPINION
September 9, 2013 | By Meredith Kleykamp and Jake Rosenfeld
Over the next few days, the largest national group of unions, the AFL-CIO, meets in Los Angeles to look at ways to stem the long-term decline of American unions. African Americans and other people of color have a lot at stake. Many people think of a union member as a white, blue-collar male, and historically that was true. In the early 1900s, nearly all U.S. unions discriminated against African Americans and refused to let them join. In 1935, when President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Wagner Act into law - guaranteeing American workers the right to bargain collectively with their employers - fewer than 1 in 100 union members in the U.S. was an African American.
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BUSINESS
March 24, 2005 | Annette Haddad, Times Staff Writer
The number of Americans who own their homes is at a historic high, yet there remains a persistent gap in homeownership that runs along racial lines, a study released Wednesday found. Despite a host of government and industry initiatives to help minorities buy their first home, a much larger percentage of whites hold title to their residences than do blacks or Latinos, according to research done by USC's Lusk Center for Real Estate.
NEWS
February 5, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Cancer death rates among African American men declined faster than those of white men in the last decade, even though overall survival rates for black men and women remained the lowest of all racial groups for most types of cancer, according to a recent report. In a study published Tuesday in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, researchers found that while the racial gap was closing for lung and smoking-related cancers, as well as prostate cancer, the disparity between black and white patients was widening for colorectal cancer and breast cancer.  "To the extent to which these disparities reflect unequal access to healthcare versus other factors remains an active area of research," wrote lead author Carol DeSantis, an epidemiologist with the American Cancer Society.
OPINION
March 22, 2007
Re " 'Magic Negro' returns," Opinion, March 19 David Ehrenstein doesn't know where literature starts and reality begins. If you go back in American literature and American film, you do come upon the figure he talks about. But Sen. Barack Obama (D-Ill.) drew 10,000 people to a rally in Oakland over the weekend because he speaks to them. If Americans are in the process of deciding what they think about this man, what does a condescending literary critic have to say about it? I think they're evaluating the man for his character and not for the color of his skin.
NEWS
February 5, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Cancer death rates among African American men declined faster than those of white men in the last decade, even though overall survival rates for black men and women remained the lowest of all racial groups for most types of cancer, according to a recent report. In a study published Tuesday in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, researchers found that while the racial gap was closing for lung and smoking-related cancers, as well as prostate cancer, the disparity between black and white patients was widening for colorectal cancer and breast cancer.  "To the extent to which these disparities reflect unequal access to healthcare versus other factors remains an active area of research," wrote lead author Carol DeSantis, an epidemiologist with the American Cancer Society.
NEWS
September 14, 2001 | From Associated Press
Life expectancy is about six years shorter for blacks than whites, and homicide is a leading contributor to the racial gap, a government study said Thursday. Homicide adds about seven months to the gap, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in what it called the first report analyzing life expectancy by race and cause of death. Overall life expectancy is about 75 years for whites and 69 years for blacks, the report said.
HEALTH
March 14, 2005 | From Associated Press
Middle-age black men are dying at nearly twice the rate of white men of a similar age, reflecting lower incomes and poorer access to health care, a study says. But mortality among black infants is dropping. Although overall longevity for blacks and whites has improved during the last 40 years, the gap between the races has narrowed little, former U.S. Surgeon General David Satcher said in a paper published Wednesday in the journal Health Affairs.
OPINION
April 24, 2011 | By David L. Kirp
April is the time when students across the nation are being diligently prepped for the dread exams mandated by the No Child Left Behind Act. The fate of thousands of public schools turns on how well their charges do. Now there's a study that appears to show that a simple one-hour exercise can halve the racial achievement gap, while also making minority students healthier and happier. Although this claim sounds as preposterous as a pitch for a potion to cure baldness or to erase wrinkles, it's made in a recent issue of the journal Science.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2010 | By Maria L. La Ganga
Aaron Glimme's Advanced Placement chemistry students straggle in, sleepy. It is 7:30 a.m. at Berkeley High School. The day doesn't officially begin for another hour. They pull on safety goggles, measure out t-butyl alcohol and try to determine the molar mass of an unknown substance by measuring how much its freezing point decreases. In the last school year, 82% of Berkeley's AP chemistry students passed the rigorous exam, which gives college credit for high school work. The national passing rate is 55.2%.
NATIONAL
February 1, 2008 | Maria L. La Ganga, Times Staff Writer
Sen. Barack Obama told a Los Angeles audience Thursday that he helped Mexican Americans as well as blacks and whites during his days as a community organizer, and that the nation must continue working to bridge its ongoing "black-brown divide." "Over the past few weeks, we've heard some cynical talk about how black folks, white folks and Latinos cannot come together," Obama told a town-hall meeting at Los Angeles Trade Technical College.
NEWS
November 20, 2007 | John Rogers and Jeannie Oakes
State schools Supt. Jack O'Connell hosted a summit in Sacramento last week of 4,000 educators, policymakers and experts. He asked them to confront California's "racial achievement gap" -- the persistently lower test scores of California's African American and Latino public school students compared with their white and Asian peers. In 125 packed sessions, participants probed causes of the gap and offered strategies to close it.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Decades after the civil rights movement, the income gap between black and white families has grown, says a study that tracked the incomes of 2,300 families for more than 30 years. Incomes have increased among both black and white families in the last three decades -- mainly because more women are in the workforce. But the increase was greater among whites, according to the study being released today.
OPINION
March 22, 2007
Re " 'Magic Negro' returns," Opinion, March 19 David Ehrenstein doesn't know where literature starts and reality begins. If you go back in American literature and American film, you do come upon the figure he talks about. But Sen. Barack Obama (D-Ill.) drew 10,000 people to a rally in Oakland over the weekend because he speaks to them. If Americans are in the process of deciding what they think about this man, what does a condescending literary critic have to say about it? I think they're evaluating the man for his character and not for the color of his skin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2006 | Mitchell Landsberg, Times Staff Writer
In the four years since the federal No Child Left Behind Act took effect, test scores in California schools have improved significantly, but the gaps between rich and poor, white and non-white, have widened, a research group said Thursday. The report from the Washington-based Education Trust found that elementary school students nationwide are doing much better on standardized tests, with a slightly more mixed picture in middle and high schools.
BUSINESS
September 29, 2005 | Jonathan Peterson, Times Staff Writer
A racial disparity in mortgage lending rates appears to be sharper in Los Angeles and other California metropolitan areas than the rest of the country, according to an analysis of federal data to be released today. The study by the Assn. of Community Organizations for Reform Now, an advocacy group for the poor, looked at the percentage of higher-cost loans issued in minority communities compared with nonminority neighborhoods in the same metropolitan area.
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