Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRacial Groups
IN THE NEWS

Racial Groups

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1991 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For hours, the Torrance teen-agers had tiptoed on the edge of the racial unknown. They talked at length about stereotypes and race. Some admitted their discomfort at revealing their true feelings. Some said nothing. And then they were ordered to make a choice. Four big signs hung in each corner of the lodge: Asian/Pacific Islander, Black African-American, Latino/Latina and White. "Which group do you identify with, racially and culturally?" an adult leader asked.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
March 7, 2014 | By Karthick Ramakrishnan
Is the debate on affirmative action versus race-blind policies mainly about principle, or mostly about preserving narrow group interests? We are beginning to find out in California. A bill passed by the state Senate and pending in the Assembly would put a constitutional amendment on the ballot that would overturn portions of Proposition 209 to exempt public college and university admissions from the ban on racial, ethnic and gender preferences. There are principled reasons to support as well as to oppose affirmative action in higher education.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 5, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS and RAY HERNDON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
From the moment segregation in America had a name, it has referred to the separateness of blacks and whites. But during the last decade, while blacks were making some progress in residential integration, Latinos and Asians became more isolated from other racial groups in the vast majority of the nation's large metropolitan areas, from Chicago's red-bricked grid to Phoenix's beige sprawl, a Times analysis of 2000 census data shows.
OPINION
June 25, 2012 | Gregory Rodriguez
It's official! A new study by the Pew Research Center proves the old trope true: Asians are the new Jews. All those essentially positive stereotypes you've heard about - the hard work and the Tiger Moms - have made Asian Americans the highest-income, best-educated and fastest-growing racial group in the United States. Not only that, in the last few years, Asians have overtaken Latinos as the largest group of new immigrants to the U.S. This is all good news - both for Asian Americans and the United States - but the Jewish comparison has a dark side.
OPINION
June 4, 1995 | JANET CHOI, JANET CHOI of San Gabriel teaches English conversation to Japanese and Chinese students. She commented on reports that all people are descended from a common ancestor: and
The obvious problem with assumptions--stereotypes--based on race is that all people with the same superficial physical characteristics are not the same. They cannot be contained in neat groups the way, say, all balls of the same color can be. Racial groups are like mercury. They disintegrate into ever tinier pieces with a touch. On close inspection, each piece reveals itself to be a separate culture. Lines are drawn around mutually hostile groups because they appear identical to the outsider.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1998 | EUGENE VOLOKH, Eugene Volokh teaches constitutional law at UCLA Law School
Asians are now white. Don't believe me? A recent MSNBC news headline announced a "Plunge in Minority University Enrollment" at the University of California, with UC Berkeley reporting that "minority admissions had declined 61%." Actually, the total percentage of racial minority students at Berkeley, Asians included, fell from 57% to 49%. If you exclude the burgeoning group of people who decline to state their race, the minority percentage fell only three percentage points, from 61% to 58%.
OPINION
March 7, 2014 | By Karthick Ramakrishnan
Is the debate on affirmative action versus race-blind policies mainly about principle, or mostly about preserving narrow group interests? We are beginning to find out in California. A bill passed by the state Senate and pending in the Assembly would put a constitutional amendment on the ballot that would overturn portions of Proposition 209 to exempt public college and university admissions from the ban on racial, ethnic and gender preferences. There are principled reasons to support as well as to oppose affirmative action in higher education.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Infant mortality among some minorities is far higher than U.S. health records indicate because of errors and inconsistencies in the way race is reported, government researchers said last week. "There were indications these discrepancies existed, but the magnitude is startling," said epidemiologist Robert A. Hahn of the federal Centers for Disease Control.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1994
Your pie charts on foreign-born residents on pages A1 and A45 (Dec. 19) have a gross terminology error. There are three racial categories (black, Asian and white), but then there is another category (Latino) which in fact is almost entirely a sub-category of the "white" racial group. By showing the pie chart the way it is, the impression is left that Latinos are some other race. I'd strongly suggest changing the categories to include "Latino" and "non-Latino white" (or "other white")
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2010 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
California Latinos have been nearly twice as likely as whites to die of H1N1 flu since the pandemic began last spring, according to statewide figures released Thursday by the California Department of Public Health. Over the same months, blacks in the state have been 50% more likely to die of H1N1 flu than whites, the report said. "Not everybody has been impacted equally" by H1N1, said state epidemiologist Dr. Gilberto Chavez, who added that statistics have shown "very important racial disparities" in H1N1 mortality and hospitalization rates.
OPINION
June 13, 2010 | Sharon Browne and Roger Clegg
Every state in the country except two — Maine and Vermont — prohibits at least some felons from voting. In January, a panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals held that the state of Washington is violating the federal Voting Rights Act by disenfranchising felons. Now the full 9th Circuit has decided to hear the case, Farrakhan vs. Gregoire. The case has implications for all nine states within the 9th Circuit's jurisdiction, including California. Every other federal court of appeals so far has ruled against using the Voting Rights Act to give felons the right to vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2010 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
California Latinos have been nearly twice as likely as whites to die of H1N1 flu since the pandemic began last spring, according to statewide figures released Thursday by the California Department of Public Health. Over the same months, blacks in the state have been 50% more likely to die of H1N1 flu than whites, the report said. "Not everybody has been impacted equally" by H1N1, said state epidemiologist Dr. Gilberto Chavez, who added that statistics have shown "very important racial disparities" in H1N1 mortality and hospitalization rates.
NATIONAL
November 23, 2004 | Emma Schwartz, Times Staff Writer
The number of reported hate crimes across the country changed little in 2003, according to FBI figures released Monday. The largest number of the 7,489 hate crimes in 2003 involved incidents against blacks, the FBI said. The total was up slightly from the 7,462 in 2002. More than half the reported hate crimes last year targeted specific racial groups.
NEWS
July 5, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS and RAY HERNDON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
From the moment segregation in America had a name, it has referred to the separateness of blacks and whites. But during the last decade, while blacks were making some progress in residential integration, Latinos and Asians became more isolated from other racial groups in the vast majority of the nation's large metropolitan areas, from Chicago's red-bricked grid to Phoenix's beige sprawl, a Times analysis of 2000 census data shows.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS and ERIN TEXEIRA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Almost two dozen stable, ethnically balanced cities emerged in Southern California over the last decade, upending the notion that swift racial turnover inevitably follows when whites start to leave a region. The proportion of Southland cities where two or more ethnic or racial groups live in substantial numbers almost doubled between 1980 and 2000. In 1980 about a fifth of Southland cities (33 of 149) fit in that category.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1998 | EUGENE VOLOKH, Eugene Volokh teaches constitutional law at UCLA Law School
Asians are now white. Don't believe me? A recent MSNBC news headline announced a "Plunge in Minority University Enrollment" at the University of California, with UC Berkeley reporting that "minority admissions had declined 61%." Actually, the total percentage of racial minority students at Berkeley, Asians included, fell from 57% to 49%. If you exclude the burgeoning group of people who decline to state their race, the minority percentage fell only three percentage points, from 61% to 58%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1997 | Richard Riordan and Tom Hayden were interviewed for The Times by Warren Olney, host of "Which Way L.A." program on KCRW-FM. Their comments were edited
Mayoral challenger Tom Hayden is a state senator and longtime political activist. Question: How would you define Los Angeles? Answer: The story of Los Angeles has been a continuing morality play about rediscovering Eden and then losing it. It's about what humans do to their surrounding environment. The original people lived a very rich spiritual life and a productive life where the river met the sea. Their Eden was the place of an original blessing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1991 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Andrew Kim came to America to get an education. Nothing more. But when he graduated from Cal State Long Beach and returned to his native Korea in 1969, Kim didn't like what he found. Good jobs were hard to come by, and the political situation was topsy-turvy. "There weren't that many opportunities," Kim recalled recently. "I was there a couple months, and I came right back to the U.S. and said this is the place I would stay." Since then, Kim has created something of an all-American Asian family.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1997 | Richard Riordan and Tom Hayden were interviewed for The Times by Warren Olney, host of "Which Way L.A." program on KCRW-FM. Their comments were edited
Mayoral challenger Tom Hayden is a state senator and longtime political activist. Question: How would you define Los Angeles? Answer: The story of Los Angeles has been a continuing morality play about rediscovering Eden and then losing it. It's about what humans do to their surrounding environment. The original people lived a very rich spiritual life and a productive life where the river met the sea. Their Eden was the place of an original blessing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1995 | NORA M. MANELLA, Nora M. Manella is U.S. attorney for the Central District of California. and
Critics of the federal government's war on illegal narcotics trafficking have seized on a new angle: reckless allegations of racism. Focusing on Congress' stiff penalties for selling crack cocaine and on statistics indicating that most federal crack defendants are African American, these critics conclude that African Americans are being prosecuted in federal court solely because of their race.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|