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Racial Politics

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2002 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Racial politics and anger over the firing of Police Chief Bernard C. Parks spilled over into the secession debate Wednesday, as about 150 people filled an auditorium at the Brookins AME Church in South Los Angeles for what was billed as an informational town hall meeting on secession. "Mayor Hahn has asked us to follow him" in opposing secession, said the Rev. Frederick O. Murph. "But we don't trust him."
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2012 | By Deborah Vankin
Award-winning playwright Tarell Alvin McCraney will direct a new -- and drastically different -- version of Shakespeare's "Antony and Cleopatra. " McCraney's adaptation explores colonialism and racial politics set against the Haitian Revolution in the 1700s. The production is a collaboration among the Royal Shakespeare Company in England, Miami's GableStage and New York's Public Theater. It will premiere November 2013 at the Royal Shakespeare Company's Stratford-upon-Avon home, before playing Stateside at GableStage in January 2014 and then the Public Theater in late January 2014.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2005 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
Playwright Thomas Gibbons plays both sides of the race card in "Permanent Collection" at the Greenway Court Theatre. Loosely based on the real-life controversy surrounding Philadelphia's Barnes Foundation, a financially beleaguered institution that endured charges of racism under the aegis of its controversial black director, the play examines the nature of racial politics in a politically correct age, when a single untoward utterance can destroy a career that took a lifetime to build.
NATIONAL
February 29, 2012 | By Michael Finnegan, Los Angeles Times
  With his presidential aspirations riding on support in the Deep South, Newt Gingrich opened his final one-week dash to the crucial Georgia primary on Wednesday with a states' rights appeal laden with racial symbolism. His setting was the ornate chamber of Georgia's House of Representatives, where Gingrich told lawmakers that he would fight for a "very strong" states' rights platform at the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla. "I want to return power back home to an extraordinary degree," said Gingrich, a former U.S. House speaker who represented Georgia in Congress for 20 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1999 | Agustin Gurza
The fallout from the forced retirement of L.A.'s school superintendent was still crackling over my car radio last week. On the 405 near Seal Beach, I picked up a talk show featuring a lovey-dovey interview with Caprice Young, member of the school board majority that ousted Ruben Zacarias. The topic was "racial politics." The host was clearly on the warpath against Mexican American leaders who had rallied around the veteran schools chief from East L.A. Did those leaders play the "race card?"
NATIONAL
January 6, 2009 | Peter Wallsten
With Senate leaders threatening to block Roland Burris from being sworn in today as Barack Obama's replacement, many of his supporters see a familiar story of race and injustice. An all-white club, they say, is trying to prevent a black man from gaining admission, as well as the power that comes with a Senate seat. Summoning a harsh metaphor from the nation's racial battles, Rep. Bobby L. Rush (D-Ill.) even called the Senate "the last bastion of plantation politics."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1991 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Judie Schoening and her husband went house hunting 2 1/2 years ago, the historic West Adams district near USC fit their taste and their budget. For $200,000, they bought a classic, 12-room Craftsman 10 minutes from downtown. Judie Schoening, who is white, said she felt welcomed by neighbors who are black, Latino and Korean.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1999 | SHAWN HUBLER
There's no feudin' like high school feudin' in Southern California. A garden-variety campus conflict here can reach heights of nastiness unparalleled in ordinary society. Some faculty lounge split spills into the classroom and, before long, stops you wouldn't dream of have been pulled out: Race. Demonstrations. Race. Investigations. Race. The current arena is stately Hamilton High School, which for months now has hosted the feud that ate West L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1991
Playing racial politics is an ugly game, yet campaign strategists have been known on occasion to turn in that direction to run up easy points. But is it too much to ask the President and other elected officials--Republican and Democrat alike--to keep race-based political attacks out of 1992 election campaigns? Not at all. If our leaders condone and promulgate divisive attitudes, little wonder that others might find it easy to express similar ugly sentiments. That's why the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2000 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a child in South-Central Los Angeles in the '70s, John Singleton says he thought the original "Shaft" was "the coolest film I'd ever seen." A lot of other people thought so, too, which is why Gordon Parks' 1971 detective movie spawned two sequels and a short-lived television series while ushering in a gritty new wave of black action movies. With their tough-talking antiheroes and hip soundtracks, the black movies of the era epitomized cool.
OPINION
January 13, 2010 | By Thomas A. Parham
The furor over Sen. Harry Reid's remarks about President Obama's race, reported by The Times in several articles, has gone way overboard. His remarks, however -- that Obama is "light-skinned" and speaks with "no Negro dialect, unless he wanted to have one" -- may yet prove useful in sparking a badly needed, frank conversation about race in America. Indeed, we can never understand what Reid meant -- and our reaction -- unless we have this conversation. Though I accept Reid's apology and take the president at his word that this is a nonissue, we must be honest with ourselves about the context of what Reid said.
OPINION
October 21, 2009
In politicized, ethnically diverse Los Angeles, it is naive to assume that any major public policy decision is made without regard to its implications for the city's racial politics. But recognizing racial politics and practicing them are two different things. For a variety of reasons, the next chief of the Los Angeles Police Department can and should be selected on merit, without regard to race. That is easier said than done. Indeed, there have been moments in recent years when race did play an important part in the qualification of a would-be chief, and appropriately so. After the beating of Rodney G. King in 1991 and the riots the following year, it was clear to any sentient Angeleno that a sharp break from the LAPD's history was required in order to restore public trust in the police.
NATIONAL
September 20, 2009 | Mark Z. Barabak and Richard Fausset
As a black man who has felt the sting of prejudice, President Obama is not only empathetic but uniquely positioned to advance the cause of equality in a country where skin color remains, for many, a barrier to opportunity and achievement. Yet throughout his career, Obama has been careful to avoid being pigeonholed as serving mainly the interest of African Americans; otherwise, he never would have been elected last November. The result is a duality to Obama's presidency. He brings aspects of the black experience into the White House -- using occasional street slang, installing a bust of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in the Oval Office.
NATIONAL
January 6, 2009 | Peter Wallsten
With Senate leaders threatening to block Roland Burris from being sworn in today as Barack Obama's replacement, many of his supporters see a familiar story of race and injustice. An all-white club, they say, is trying to prevent a black man from gaining admission, as well as the power that comes with a Senate seat. Summoning a harsh metaphor from the nation's racial battles, Rep. Bobby L. Rush (D-Ill.) even called the Senate "the last bastion of plantation politics."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2008 | Marc Weingarten, Special to The Times
YOU don't hear folks touting the virtues of Compton too often. But where some might view the city as an incubator of crime and poverty, Nina Revoyr sees a land of comity and cultural richness. "Compton is a very romantic place for me," said the novelist, who was eating brunch at Auntie Em's, a hipster-magnet restaurant near her Eagle Rock home. "Historically, Compton's had an organic blend of Japanese and African American culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2006 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
A refreshing shift from the red state-blue state paradigm that has marked most U.S. political documentaries since 2000, Marshall Curry's sharp-eyed, Oscar-nominated "Street Fight" maps the no-holds-barred battle between two African American Democrats for the mayoralty of Newark, N.J., in 2002. The election pitted Cory Booker, a 32-year-old former Stanford football player, Rhodes scholar and Yale law grad against four-term incumbent Sharpe James.
OPINION
October 21, 2009
In politicized, ethnically diverse Los Angeles, it is naive to assume that any major public policy decision is made without regard to its implications for the city's racial politics. But recognizing racial politics and practicing them are two different things. For a variety of reasons, the next chief of the Los Angeles Police Department can and should be selected on merit, without regard to race. That is easier said than done. Indeed, there have been moments in recent years when race did play an important part in the qualification of a would-be chief, and appropriately so. After the beating of Rodney G. King in 1991 and the riots the following year, it was clear to any sentient Angeleno that a sharp break from the LAPD's history was required in order to restore public trust in the police.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2006 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
A refreshing shift from the red state-blue state paradigm that has marked most U.S. political documentaries since 2000, Marshall Curry's sharp-eyed, Oscar-nominated "Street Fight" maps the no-holds-barred battle between two African American Democrats for the mayoralty of Newark, N.J., in 2002. The election pitted Cory Booker, a 32-year-old former Stanford football player, Rhodes scholar and Yale law grad against four-term incumbent Sharpe James.
OPINION
September 25, 2005 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
As brackish floodwaters are pumped back into Louisiana's Lake Pontchartrain, what's left behind is pretty nasty. Unusable buildings, decimated neighborhoods, and -- surprise! -- ugly issues of race. According to a Pew Research Center poll, three-quarters of white Americans think that race played no part in the bayou rescue fiasco, while two-thirds of blacks think it was a factor. Talk about a gulf ripe for a storm.
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