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Racial Quotas

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1991
Terry Eastland's article "It's Ebb Tide for Quotas as Lobby Declines" (Column Right, April 25) used quite twisted logic to deem it immoral for civil rights activists to work with business leaders to strengthen incentives for employers to comply with anti-discrimination laws. To call it a "conspiracy to trade away the rights of those (smaller businesses) not at the talks" was truly a stretch of the imagination. In the first place, it's hard to believe that anyone can refer to a meeting with 65 CEOs as "secret talks."
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OPINION
February 23, 2012
For 40 years, competitive colleges and universities in the United States have taken race into account in order to increase their enrollment of African Americans (and, to a lesser extent, other minorities). Originally justified as a way to compensate for a long legacy of racial discrimination, and later embraced as a way to provide a more diverse learning environment, affirmative action has been good for the United States. It has made it easier for minorities to enter the educational and professional mainstream without compromising the rigor of American higher education.
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NEWS
September 18, 1985 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III assailed advocates of racial quotas in hiring, admissions and promotions Tuesday, comparing them to those who defended slavery more than a century ago as "a kind of benevolence" for slaves and society. "They will tell you that such policies are good not only for the recipient but for society," Meese said in a speech to students and faculty members at Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pa.
OPINION
September 12, 2006
Re "If it works for the Cabinet ..." editorial, Sept. 8 The Times criticizes the Bush administration for opposing race-based student assignments because "in many places the only way to bring students of different races together is to take account of race." This statement isn't relevant to the cases at hand. The administration argues in its Supreme Court briefs that the Seattle and Louisville, Ky., school systems failed even to consider race-neutral means that could have worked just as well as racial quotas, including the use of magnet schools.
OPINION
August 1, 1993 | ERNEST W. LEFEVER, Ernest W. Lefever, a senior fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center in Washington, became active in the civil-rights movement during World War II
On July 2, just before Independence Day, in Tucson, 75 Mexican immigrants and one Peruvian, all wearing small American flags, became naturalized U.S. citizens. Nothing unusual, except that the half-hour swearing-in ceremony was conducted largely in Spanish at the request of District Judge Alfredo Marquez. This dismayed many earlier immigrants who took pride in learning the language of their adopted country, as will a new, 53-page, U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1993
If Jackson's demand for racial quotas in the front offices and the broadcasting booths really catches on, how will he feel about racial parity on the fields, diamonds and basketball courts? BURT PRELUTSKY North Hills
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1987
Your recent editorial, "Legislators' Shabby Display" (Sept. 13), was as frustrating as it was inaccurate. It was not based upon fact, it did not reflect the truth as your reporters in Sacramento know it and, journalistically, it was nothing more than a venom-filled, slanted diatribe against the Republican Party and the philosophy held by many in Orange County, which your Los Angeles newspaper abhors. For instance, you started by declaring that the Orange County Republican Assembly delegation did little to distinguish itself this year.
NEWS
April 25, 1989
The National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People announced its opposition to William Lucas as the Justice Department's civil rights chief. Benjamin L. Hooks, executive director of the NAACP, said in a statement that though qualified for other jobs in the Bush Administration, "we do not believe Mr. Lucas is the person for this post." Lucas, a black Republican who opposes racial quotas and is a critic of affirmative action, has drawn fire from other civil rights organizations since Atty.
OPINION
August 9, 1987
I am an admirer of Alan Dershowitz and was astounded to read his recent article "Ollie North in Judicial Robes," (Editorial Pages, July 29). Dershowitz makes a self-righteous case that the appointment of Bork to the Supreme Court is merely a means of "advancing their (President Reagan and Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III) political goals." It never occurs to Dershowitz that the opposition to Bork by Sen. Ted Kennedy (D-Mass.), Dershowitz and others of liberal persuasion are trying to advance their own political goals by keeping Bork out. They have decided on their own litmus tests for a Supreme Court justice.
OPINION
September 12, 2006
Re "If it works for the Cabinet ..." editorial, Sept. 8 The Times criticizes the Bush administration for opposing race-based student assignments because "in many places the only way to bring students of different races together is to take account of race." This statement isn't relevant to the cases at hand. The administration argues in its Supreme Court briefs that the Seattle and Louisville, Ky., school systems failed even to consider race-neutral means that could have worked just as well as racial quotas, including the use of magnet schools.
NATIONAL
November 15, 2005 | Richard A. Serrano and David G. Savage, Times Staff Writers
Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr., once seeking to advance his career as a Reagan White House lawyer, described himself as a dedicated conservative and said he was "particularly proud" of his attempts to end racial and ethnic quotas and establish that the Constitution did not give women a right to abortion. In a 1985 application for a high-level political appointment in the Department of Justice, Alito portrayed himself as strictly conservative and strongly partisan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2005 | Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writer
A group of parents Thursday sued the Capistrano Unified School District, alleging that trustees recently redrew attendance boundaries to fulfill racial quotas at individual schools in violation of the state Constitution. The lawsuit says attendance areas were shifted this year to ensure that minority enrollment in the district's middle and high schools did not top 35%.
NEWS
February 29, 2004 | Michael Astor, Associated Press Writer
Black activists are trying a new weapon in their quest for racial equality in deeply divided Brazil: little white flowers. The white camellia has become a seal of approval that the Center for Articulation of Marginalized Peoples will award to stores, companies and schools that hire, promote and enroll black people. "We're going to show that no one profits from racism," said the group's leader, Ivanir dos Santos.
OPINION
June 30, 2003 | Richard Sander, Richard Sander is a professor of law at UCLA and director of its Empirical Research Group.
In its affirmative action decision last week, the Supreme Court announced that explicit racial boosts, like the 20 points awarded to blacks by the University of Michigan's undergraduate admissions office, are unconstitutional. But "individualized assessments" of applicants (like those used by Michigan's law school) that factor in race among other considerations are not only acceptable but highly desirable.
NEWS
August 25, 1997 | GEORGE SKELTON
The "bible" says that California's establishment has sinned against the people. Sinned with racial preferences, illegal-immigrant services, bilingual education and other evils that tend to divide rather than unite. These wrongs are recognized by most voters, the "bible" observes, even if they're not by the establishment--the news media, universities, big corporations and liberal politicians. This particular holy book is the Almanac of American Politics.
NEWS
February 2, 1997
Michael McLaughlin's lawsuit to get his daughter admitted to Boston Latin School after she had been rejected in favor of less qualified African Americans and Latinos prompts me to reminisce ("Ancient Wounds," Jan. 16). I attended Boston Latin with the class of 1931. The brightest student in my homeroom was Reed Edwin Peggram, the first black person I had ever known. Racial quotas and set-asides had not been invented. Peggram and everyone else at Boston Latin was academically qualified.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1992
The article on Disneyland's announced 15% minority contracting quotas ("Disney Seeks Minority Firms for O.C. Resort," June 16) failed to note the abuses of such set-asides in the public sector. Minority-owned firms capable of performing the work don't need quotas, while smaller firms are often lured into contracts they simply cannot fulfill. They either overextend themselves into bankruptcy or farm the work out to "white" firms. The checkered record of the Century Freeway project is rife with such problems, as has been reported in The Times itself.
NEWS
February 2, 1997
Michael McLaughlin's lawsuit to get his daughter admitted to Boston Latin School after she had been rejected in favor of less qualified African Americans and Latinos prompts me to reminisce ("Ancient Wounds," Jan. 16). I attended Boston Latin with the class of 1931. The brightest student in my homeroom was Reed Edwin Peggram, the first black person I had ever known. Racial quotas and set-asides had not been invented. Peggram and everyone else at Boston Latin was academically qualified.
NEWS
November 16, 1996 | From Associated Press
Boston dropped racial quotas at its three finest public schools Friday, dismantling the 2-decade-old policy under pressure from a white girl who claimed reverse discrimination. The quotas, a vestige of the 1970s desegregation case that plunged Boston into violence, will be replaced with a yet-to-be determined method that will "ensure that students in Boston from every racial and ethnic group have equal access," said Robert Gittens, chairman of the school board.
OPINION
August 1, 1993 | ERNEST W. LEFEVER, Ernest W. Lefever, a senior fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center in Washington, became active in the civil-rights movement during World War II
On July 2, just before Independence Day, in Tucson, 75 Mexican immigrants and one Peruvian, all wearing small American flags, became naturalized U.S. citizens. Nothing unusual, except that the half-hour swearing-in ceremony was conducted largely in Spanish at the request of District Judge Alfredo Marquez. This dismayed many earlier immigrants who took pride in learning the language of their adopted country, as will a new, 53-page, U.S.
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