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NEWS
January 4, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A veteran of the Detroit police force, Harold L. Johnson Jr., has been hired as police chief of Mobile, Ala., the first black police chief in a major Alabama city. A second black man, Reuben Greenberg, was chosen for the post of public safety director, which is above that of police chief. Greenberg is chief of police in Charleston, S.C. Mobile's population of 200,000 is about 37% black. Lt. Sam Cochran, vice president of the Mobile County Law Enforcement Assn.
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NEWS
April 28, 2001 | From the Washington Post
In a packed, hushed courtroom, prosecutors Friday played an FBI surveillance tape from 37 years ago in which the accused bomber of the 16th Street Baptist Church told his wife he had planned the bombing under a river bridge where the Ku Klux Klan's most violent cell held its meetings. Jurors heard Blanton's then-wife, Jeanne, tell him in the summer of 1964 that the FBI had asked her why he went to the Cahaba River south of Birmingham on the Friday night before the bombing.
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NEWS
April 14, 2001 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some of the evidence lay buried in FBI wiretaps ordered sealed by former Director J. Edgar Hoover himself. Other evidence against two ex-Ku Klux Klansmen, prosecutors say, remained behind the sealed lips of relatives too scared to talk. But now--more than 37 years after four black girls were killed in a dynamite bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church--those seals have been broken. And a team of state and federal attorneys is poised to shed light on one of the darkest chapters in U.S.
NEWS
April 25, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Racial hatred and a desire to halt the civil rights movement led a Ku Klux Klansman to bomb a Birmingham church in 1963, killing four black girls, a federal prosecutor said on the opening day of the historic murder trial. Thomas Blanton Jr.'s "hatred and hostility toward African Americans" provided the 62-year-old defendant with a motive to bomb the 16th Street Baptist Church, U.S. Atty. Doug Jones told a Birmingham court.
NEWS
October 22, 2000 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not even a week into his term as Selma's first black mayor, James Perkins Jr. had to stand face to face with a cast-iron reminder of his town's openly racist ways. There, under one of the arching, graying oak trees that line the streets and make Selma feel as old as it is, glared Nathan Bedford Forrest, a Confederate general who died 123 years ago. No matter that the great cavalry man had been reduced to a hollow bust and block of granite.
NEWS
February 15, 1987 | Associated Press
About 2,000 marchers protesting what they called diminished black political clout in the Statehouse and an "anti-black attitude" in the White House rallied Saturday at the Alabama Capitol. "My objective here is to rejuvenate Martin Luther King's strategies," said the Rev. Hosea Williams of Atlanta, who joined Alabama black leaders in the protest. "It's time again for nonviolent direct action. Back to the streets." The Rev.
NEWS
March 12, 1988 | Associated Press
The president of the Alabama NAACP and 13 other black legislators asked a judge Friday to dismiss trespassing charges stemming from their attempt to remove the Confederate flag from the Capitol dome. Defense attorneys invoked claims of legislative immunity from such misdemeanor charges and said state historians, not Republican Gov. Guy Hunt, had jurisdiction to order any arrests while the Capitol is being renovated.
NEWS
March 16, 1994 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is a bucolic little town, nestled amid the foothills of eastern Alabama. There is one traffic light, one drugstore and one high school, which Tuesday sat empty, testament to the silent power of forces that roil beneath Wedowee's placid surface. "Parents are jumpy. The kids are jumpy," said Dale McKay, the superintendent. He ordered the school closed after the school board, in a raucous, jam-packed meeting, suspended the principal Monday night. "We have to look out for the safety of the kids."
SPORTS
June 29, 1990 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An angry Birmingham, Ala., community leader, upset by what he considers discriminatory practices by Shoal Creek Golf Club, site of the PGA Championship in August, has threatened an organized protest of the tournament if a black isn't invited to join the private facility. The Rev. Abraham Woods, a respected and vocal civil rights leader in the Birmingham area, said Thursday that he will lead a picket march of the event Aug. 9-12 unless the Shoal Creek membership actively recruits a black.
NEWS
February 20, 1990 | Associated Press
Jury selection began under tight security Monday for the trial of a man charged with shooting a young woman whose rape and slaying may have been a motive for the mail bomb killings of a lawyer and a judge. The courtroom was inspected by bomb-sniffing dogs, and metal detectors were in place outside the courtroom. Emmanuel Hammond, 24, of Marietta, Ga., is charged with murder, felony murder, kidnaping and armed robbery in the shotgun slaying of Julie Love, 27.
NEWS
April 14, 2001 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some of the evidence lay buried in FBI wiretaps ordered sealed by former Director J. Edgar Hoover himself. Other evidence against two ex-Ku Klux Klansmen, prosecutors say, remained behind the sealed lips of relatives too scared to talk. But now--more than 37 years after four black girls were killed in a dynamite bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church--those seals have been broken. And a team of state and federal attorneys is poised to shed light on one of the darkest chapters in U.S.
NEWS
October 22, 2000 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not even a week into his term as Selma's first black mayor, James Perkins Jr. had to stand face to face with a cast-iron reminder of his town's openly racist ways. There, under one of the arching, graying oak trees that line the streets and make Selma feel as old as it is, glared Nathan Bedford Forrest, a Confederate general who died 123 years ago. No matter that the great cavalry man had been reduced to a hollow bust and block of granite.
NEWS
March 6, 2000 | JACK NELSON, CHIEF WASHINGTON CORRESPONDENT
It was a procession of ghosts. Returning as if through a time warp were figures from one of the darkest chapters in American history, the 1965 episode in which state troopers and sheriff's deputies attacked defenseless civil rights marchers with such violence that almost the whole nation rose up in outrage. Only this time everything was different.
NEWS
June 3, 1999 | Associated Press
Alabama lawmakers have approved an amendment to the state constitution that would eliminate the nation's last remaining ban on interracial marriages. The amendment will take effect if approved by voters in a special election Oct. 12. The proposal was approved by the state House in April and by the Senate on Tuesday without dissent. "It sends a good message across this country that Alabama is not as backwards as some people think it is," said the legislation's sponsor, Democratic Rep.
NEWS
October 11, 1996 | From Associated Press
The last time George C. Wallace and Vivian Malone Jones laid eyes on each other, he was governor and she was a young black woman he was trying to keep out of the University of Alabama with his "stand in the schoolhouse door." Thirty-three years later, she and Wallace, a sickly shadow of the 1960s segregationist, met again Thursday night before Jones received an award, named in memory of Wallace's wife, that recognizes women who made major improvements in the state.
NEWS
October 18, 1995 | From Associated Press
A racially mixed jury was picked Tuesday in the case against a black activist's son accused of burning down a rural high school whose white principal had condemned mixed-race dating at the prom. Four blacks and eight whites will hear the federal case against Christopher Lynn Johnson. Randolph County High School in Wedowee burned last year after months of racial turmoil.
NEWS
January 11, 1989
A judge in Montgomery, Ala., convicted state NAACP President Thomas Reed and 13 black legislators on a misdemeanor trespassing charge in their protest against the Confederate battle flag flying atop the state Capitol. Montgomery County District Judge Craig Miller fined each of the 14 defendants $100 plus court costs. The defendants were arrested Feb.
NEWS
December 13, 1994 | From Times Wire Services
A settlement has been reached to resolve discrimination complaints at an Alabama school district where a principal threatened to cancel a prom if an interracial couple attended, the Justice Department said Monday. The agreement was reached by the Randolph County school district, a group of county residents and the Justice Department. The school district agreed to create a non-discriminatory discipline policy and to set up a committee to enforce unbiased personnel rules.
NEWS
August 12, 1994 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tiny Wedowee, Ala., is an unlikely setting for a battle over the soul of the South. The formerly placid town of 900 sits amid forests and postcard-perfect lakes, a rifle shot away from the Georgia border. It has become home in recent years to retirees from Atlanta and Birmingham, folks tired of city traffic, crime and bustle who just want to get back to basics, back to the way things used to be. But as the last several tension-racked months have shown, the way things used to be is vanishing.
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