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Racial Relations Australia

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NEWS
September 25, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Cathy Freeman took to the track early this morning to run the 400-meter finals at Olympic Stadium, she was wearing the prescribed Australian team uniform, green and gold. But her shoes--those were yellow, red and black. Yellow for the sun. Red for the land, the red center of this vast island continent. And black for Australia's indigenous people, the Aborigines.
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NEWS
September 25, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Cathy Freeman took to the track early this morning to run the 400-meter finals at Olympic Stadium, she was wearing the prescribed Australian team uniform, green and gold. But her shoes--those were yellow, red and black. Yellow for the sun. Red for the land, the red center of this vast island continent. And black for Australia's indigenous people, the Aborigines.
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NEWS
January 27, 1988 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
The Sydney Symphony Orchestra struck up "Waltzing Matilda" and people in pubs all over town spilled into the streets Tuesday as the descendants of convicts stood side by side with British royalty to mark the 200th anniversary of Australia's ascent from one of the world's most miserable penal colonies to a modern nation.
SPORTS
September 13, 2000 | BILL PLASCHKE
Over shimmering Darling Harbor she looms, as big as a building, staring down on bobbing ships, flapping flags, the tinklings of dinner toasts. This is Cathy Freeman's country now, even if it doesn't much look like her. The Aboriginal sprinter crouches in a skyscraper mural, preparing to run into the arms of a nation suddenly ready to hug. "That's our girl, mate," announces white businessman Kevin Dixon from a nearby bridge.
SPORTS
September 13, 2000 | BILL PLASCHKE
Over shimmering Darling Harbor she looms, as big as a building, staring down on bobbing ships, flapping flags, the tinklings of dinner toasts. This is Cathy Freeman's country now, even if it doesn't much look like her. The Aboriginal sprinter crouches in a skyscraper mural, preparing to run into the arms of a nation suddenly ready to hug. "That's our girl, mate," announces white businessman Kevin Dixon from a nearby bridge.
NEWS
January 27, 1988 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
The Sydney Symphony Orchestra struck up "Waltzing Matilda" and people in pubs all over town spilled into the streets Tuesday as the descendants of convicts stood side by side with British royalty to mark the 200th anniversary of Australia's ascent from one of the world's most miserable penal colonies to a modern nation.
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