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Racial Relations Bosnia Herzegovina

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NEWS
June 13, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
None of the three men in a smoky, odorous recovery room of Kosevo Hospital will ever walk again, let alone pick up a rifle to settle the score for his lost limbs. But the fighters wounded in Bosnia's lopsided war exude a hostile energy that infects visiting comrades who are forced to ponder how easily death or maiming could be their own fate.
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NEWS
June 7, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last time her family saw Rukija Bejtovic alive, the frail old woman was settling in for an evening of television. Within the next two hours, men kicked in the door of her first-floor apartment, where she lived alone. They tore her from her bed and roughed her up, autopsy and police reports would later indicate, then wrapped her in sheets and hauled her away into the winter night. Bejtovic's body, clad in yellow pajamas, was found 13 days later by shepherds tending their flock.
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NEWS
June 28, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this Croatian nationalist stronghold marooned between craggy ridges of the Dinaric Mountains, young men strut in the high-collared black uniforms of World War II-era fascists. Police patrolling the grenade-pocked streets sport buttons bearing the likeness of Ante Pavelic, the native son and Nazi quisling who directed the slaughter of hundreds of thousands of Serbs half a century ago. "Long Live the NDH!"
NEWS
March 2, 1994 | DAVID LAUTER and CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bosnian government and Croatian separatists, two of the parties in a three-sided war, signed a peace agreement Tuesday to form a federated state--a move hailed by U.S. officials as a significant step toward ending two years of bloodshed in Bosnia-Herzegovina. The agreement "shows that peace is possible," Secretary of State Warren Christopher declared after witnessing the pact's signing at a ceremony here.
NEWS
August 2, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Milka Stojanovic believes that her stay in this desolate Neretva River ghost town is a temporary inconvenience until peace is restored in her native city of Travnik. But Travnik is now securely in the hands of predominantly Muslim Bosnian government forces, and Stojanovic and thousands of other Travnik Croats are probably here to stay. It is only now dawning on the recent arrivals to Capljina that their sudden relocation might not have been driven by Muslim invaders.
NEWS
March 2, 1994 | DAVID LAUTER and CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bosnian government and Croatian separatists, two of the parties in a three-sided war, signed a peace agreement Tuesday to form a federated state--a move hailed by U.S. officials as a significant step toward ending two years of bloodshed in Bosnia-Herzegovina. The agreement "shows that peace is possible," Secretary of State Warren Christopher declared after witnessing the pact's signing at a ceremony here.
NEWS
June 7, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last time her family saw Rukija Bejtovic alive, the frail old woman was settling in for an evening of television. Within the next two hours, men kicked in the door of her first-floor apartment, where she lived alone. They tore her from her bed and roughed her up, autopsy and police reports would later indicate, then wrapped her in sheets and hauled her away into the winter night. Bejtovic's body, clad in yellow pajamas, was found 13 days later by shepherds tending their flock.
NEWS
June 11, 1993 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Antonia Jurisic spent four days huddled in the basement with her family as shells and bullets screamed through the streets above. Finally there was a knock on the door. It was the Croatian army. The battle has been lost, the soldiers said. Get out now.
NEWS
August 2, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Milka Stojanovic believes that her stay in this desolate Neretva River ghost town is a temporary inconvenience until peace is restored in her native city of Travnik. But Travnik is now securely in the hands of predominantly Muslim Bosnian government forces, and Stojanovic and thousands of other Travnik Croats are probably here to stay. It is only now dawning on the recent arrivals to Capljina that their sudden relocation might not have been driven by Muslim invaders.
NEWS
June 13, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
None of the three men in a smoky, odorous recovery room of Kosevo Hospital will ever walk again, let alone pick up a rifle to settle the score for his lost limbs. But the fighters wounded in Bosnia's lopsided war exude a hostile energy that infects visiting comrades who are forced to ponder how easily death or maiming could be their own fate.
NEWS
June 11, 1993 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Antonia Jurisic spent four days huddled in the basement with her family as shells and bullets screamed through the streets above. Finally there was a knock on the door. It was the Croatian army. The battle has been lost, the soldiers said. Get out now.
NEWS
June 28, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this Croatian nationalist stronghold marooned between craggy ridges of the Dinaric Mountains, young men strut in the high-collared black uniforms of World War II-era fascists. Police patrolling the grenade-pocked streets sport buttons bearing the likeness of Ante Pavelic, the native son and Nazi quisling who directed the slaughter of hundreds of thousands of Serbs half a century ago. "Long Live the NDH!"
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