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Racial Relations Brazil

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April 10, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mestre Didi, the leader of an Afro-Brazilian cult of the dead, is a 6th-generation descendant of African slaves. He has traced his ancestors back across the South Atlantic, visited their West African homelands and learned the archaic Yoruba language they spoke. Like Mestre Didi, more than half of Brazil's 145 million people have African ancestors.
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NEWS
September 5, 1996 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tiririca is one of Brazil's most popular singers, a former circus clown who sings childish ditties, a man of humble origins and mixed race. But Tiririca, according to some Afro-Brazilian leaders, has recorded a song that is insulting to blacks. A judge in Rio de Janeiro agreed: She ordered his record pulled from the shelves. The singer and his record company, Sony Music, have been hit with criminal and civil actions accusing them of racism.
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NEWS
September 5, 1996 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tiririca is one of Brazil's most popular singers, a former circus clown who sings childish ditties, a man of humble origins and mixed race. But Tiririca, according to some Afro-Brazilian leaders, has recorded a song that is insulting to blacks. A judge in Rio de Janeiro agreed: She ordered his record pulled from the shelves. The singer and his record company, Sony Music, have been hit with criminal and civil actions accusing them of racism.
NEWS
April 10, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mestre Didi, the leader of an Afro-Brazilian cult of the dead, is a 6th-generation descendant of African slaves. He has traced his ancestors back across the South Atlantic, visited their West African homelands and learned the archaic Yoruba language they spoke. Like Mestre Didi, more than half of Brazil's 145 million people have African ancestors.
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