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NEWS
November 27, 1992 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Americans aren't given to thinking of Canada as a land where a sour and politicized police force would mutiny against a civilian government. After all, what country besides Canada employs its federal law officers--the Mounties--as a tourist attraction and symbol of rectitude? But now police in Ontario, Canada's largest province, are waging a low-grade insurgency against the reformist government here.
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NEWS
November 27, 1992 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Americans aren't given to thinking of Canada as a land where a sour and politicized police force would mutiny against a civilian government. After all, what country besides Canada employs its federal law officers--the Mounties--as a tourist attraction and symbol of rectitude? But now police in Ontario, Canada's largest province, are waging a low-grade insurgency against the reformist government here.
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NEWS
August 30, 1990 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Canadian army troops and masked Mohawks jointly dismantled barricades at a key commuter bridge into Montreal on Wednesday, taking a major and unexpected step toward resolving an armed standoff that has preoccupied this country for seven weeks. The sudden army-Indian cooperation came just as the army was scheduled to demolish the barricades by itself, using armored personnel carriers fitted with bulldozer blades.
NEWS
June 13, 1992 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For decades, Canadians have prided themselves on the apparent colorblind nature of their society, on a level of tolerance that seemed to contrast sharply with the racism they heard about in the United States. Canada never had black slavery; it was a terminus of the old underground railroad out of the antebellum South. "Multiculturalism" has long been the official policy of the federal government here.
NEWS
June 13, 1992 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For decades, Canadians have prided themselves on the apparent colorblind nature of their society, on a level of tolerance that seemed to contrast sharply with the racism they heard about in the United States. Canada never had black slavery; it was a terminus of the old underground railroad out of the antebellum South. "Multiculturalism" has long been the official policy of the federal government here.
NEWS
November 23, 1991 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Throughout much of their history, French-speakers in the province of Quebec suffered economic discrimination at the hands of an English-speaking business elite. Francophones traditionally worked the shop floors and assembly lines; les anglais called the tune from the executive suite. That isn't so in Quebec today, but the painful memories linger.
NEWS
May 6, 1992 | From Associated Press
New disturbances and looting broke out Tuesday night in the area of downtown Toronto where a six-hour riot shook the provincial capital the night before. Youths tossed at least two fire bombs and looted a jewelry shop on Yonge Street. Police made 10 arrests, but no injuries were reported. The Eaton Centre, an upscale shopping complex, closed early as hundreds of black and white youths faced off with riot police, some on horseback, on the shopping strip along Toronto's main north-south artery.
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Claudette Blier-Houle, the trouble started with a simple attempt to get a better education for her children. "I never anticipated such a negative response," Blier-Houle said recently. "I certainly didn't expect to precipitate a revolt." Nevertheless, Blier-Houle, an accountant, is embroiled in a bitter dispute between French- and English-speakers that is spreading across Canada. One commentator has called it "a cancer that leaps from one part of a ravaged body to another."
NEWS
May 6, 1992 | From Associated Press
New disturbances and looting broke out Tuesday night in the area of downtown Toronto where a six-hour riot shook the provincial capital the night before. Youths tossed at least two fire bombs and looted a jewelry shop on Yonge Street. Police made 10 arrests, but no injuries were reported. The Eaton Centre, an upscale shopping complex, closed early as hundreds of black and white youths faced off with riot police, some on horseback, on the shopping strip along Toronto's main north-south artery.
NEWS
November 23, 1991 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Throughout much of their history, French-speakers in the province of Quebec suffered economic discrimination at the hands of an English-speaking business elite. Francophones traditionally worked the shop floors and assembly lines; les anglais called the tune from the executive suite. That isn't so in Quebec today, but the painful memories linger.
NEWS
August 30, 1990 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Canadian army troops and masked Mohawks jointly dismantled barricades at a key commuter bridge into Montreal on Wednesday, taking a major and unexpected step toward resolving an armed standoff that has preoccupied this country for seven weeks. The sudden army-Indian cooperation came just as the army was scheduled to demolish the barricades by itself, using armored personnel carriers fitted with bulldozer blades.
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Claudette Blier-Houle, the trouble started with a simple attempt to get a better education for her children. "I never anticipated such a negative response," Blier-Houle said recently. "I certainly didn't expect to precipitate a revolt." Nevertheless, Blier-Houle, an accountant, is embroiled in a bitter dispute between French- and English-speakers that is spreading across Canada. One commentator has called it "a cancer that leaps from one part of a ravaged body to another."
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