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NEWS
March 2, 1995 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Legend has it that Ernest Hemingway once derided his hometown as a place filled with broad lawns and narrow minds; Frank Lloyd Wright appalled his neighbors here when he ran off with a client's wife. More than a half-century later, however, this western suburb of Chicago has become a bastion of progressive liberalism--a sort of Berkeley-on-the-Prairie.
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NEWS
November 11, 1995 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was after 1 a.m. when the Ford Heights police impounded Richard Will's car and arrested the friend who'd been driving--he was wanted for failing to pay child support. They left Will, who had had a drink or two, stranded in the nation's poorest suburb, in a neighborhood frequented by drug dealers and gangs. Fifteen minutes later, police responding to a call about a prone person on fire saw Will again. He'd been beaten, doused with lighter fluid and set aflame.
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NEWS
April 2, 1989 | BOB SECTER and TRACY SHRYER, Times Staff Writers
To grasp the depth of racial polarization in their town, all Chicagoans need do is tune in Monday night to an unusual radio program. Only hours before polls open in Tuesday's mayoral election, two competing radio stations--one with a predominantly white audience and the other heavily black--will simulcast a call-in show to unite their listeners for the first time over the airwaves.
NEWS
March 2, 1995 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Legend has it that Ernest Hemingway once derided his hometown as a place filled with broad lawns and narrow minds; Frank Lloyd Wright appalled his neighbors here when he ran off with a client's wife. More than a half-century later, however, this western suburb of Chicago has become a bastion of progressive liberalism--a sort of Berkeley-on-the-Prairie.
NEWS
September 30, 1989 | ERIC HARRISON and TRACY SHRYER, Times Staff Writers
Two black youths, both 14, were waiting for a bus in a white working-class neighborhood after a White Sox game. Two white police officers picked them up, the teen-agers alleged, told them blacks did not belong in that community and slapped them before dropping them off in another white neighborhood. There, they were chased and beaten by a gang of whites. One of the youths required hospitalization.
NEWS
May 24, 1988 | LARRY GREEN and BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writers
A power and leadership vacuum in the wake of Mayor Harold Washington's death six months ago has led to a series of bizarre confrontations that have heightened tensions in this city and reopened racial wounds that the late mayor had struggled to heal.
NEWS
February 24, 1987 | BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writer
As voters head to the polls today to decide a racially heated Democratic mayoral primary, the fates of black incumbent Harold Washington and white challenger Jane M. Byrne could rise or fall with the balky elevators in rundown public housing projects. Lifts constantly break in the high-rise structures, and the 144,000 people who live in the projects, most of whom are black, are miffed at Washington about it.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1991 | SHARON COHEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It's a sweltering Sunday and the priest, draped in his African-style robe with a mural of a black Jesus in his shadow, is preaching the gospel of the ghetto: drugs, death and destruction. "We are living in a New Jack City," he says, his raw voice rising into the rafters. "It's a place where crime is catching. It's a place where murders are senseless. . . . It's a place where police can beat somebody up while 10 more stand around and watch!"
NEWS
May 2, 1988
Angry religious leaders said that an aide to Chicago Mayor Eugene Sawyer should be fired for making comments they viewed as racial and religious slurs against Jews and Christians. But Monroe Anderson, the mayor's press secretary, said there was only a "very, very remote" chance that Sawyer would fire Steve Cokely, who works as a liaison with black nationalist groups, the Chicago Tribune reported.
NEWS
March 28, 1990 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chicago's ambitious school reform process, which handed control of each school to a local elected council, became quickly mired in controversy last month when protests erupted at a number of schools over the dismissal of principals. Like nearly every aspect of social policy in Chicago, race was at the center of the conflict. United Neighborhood Organization (UNO), a politically ambitious Mexican-American group, was accused of engineering the firing of white principals at Latino schools.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1991 | SHARON COHEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It's a sweltering Sunday and the priest, draped in his African-style robe with a mural of a black Jesus in his shadow, is preaching the gospel of the ghetto: drugs, death and destruction. "We are living in a New Jack City," he says, his raw voice rising into the rafters. "It's a place where crime is catching. It's a place where murders are senseless. . . . It's a place where police can beat somebody up while 10 more stand around and watch!"
NEWS
May 7, 1991 | BOB SECTER, Times Chicago Bureau Chief
There's a strange new sound echoing through the halls and back rooms of government in Chicago, where politics has so often been measured in decibels. It's called silence. For much of the last decade, Carl Sandburg's City of Big Shoulders seemed more like the Center of Crass Loudmouths. Black and white politicians united mostly in their disdain for one another and weren't afraid to say it.
NEWS
October 20, 1990 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harold Washington died almost three years ago, but in the raucous world of Chicago politics his name--if not, perhaps, his spirit--lives on in the form of a now-you-see-it-now-you-don't political party that could cause major problems for Chicago Democrats. The all-black Harold Washington Party, named after the city's first black mayor, was formed last year by Alderman Timothy C. Evans, a Washington protege who waged an unsuccessful mayoral campaign as an independent.
NEWS
July 4, 1990 | BOB SECTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite finding no contamination, a Milwaukee sausage maker said Tuesday that it would destroy thousands of pounds of packaged meat recalled from groceries recently in a racially motivated product tampering scare. Fritz Usinger, president of the family-owned Usinger's sausage empire, said laboratory tests showed no evidence of the rat poison that a controversial black politician claimed might have been injected into the meat by a terrorist group.
NEWS
May 12, 1990 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chicago's highly touted plan to reform the school system that has been called the worst in the nation was thrown into turmoil Friday when Mayor Richard M. Daley rejected 38 of 45 school board nominees presented by a citizens' nominating committee. Amid charges of racial insensitivity and political gamesmanship, Daley and a coalition of mostly black activists are jousting over the makeup of the new board that is supposed to guide the school system during its new era of reform.
NEWS
March 28, 1990 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chicago's ambitious school reform process, which handed control of each school to a local elected council, became quickly mired in controversy last month when protests erupted at a number of schools over the dismissal of principals. Like nearly every aspect of social policy in Chicago, race was at the center of the conflict. United Neighborhood Organization (UNO), a politically ambitious Mexican-American group, was accused of engineering the firing of white principals at Latino schools.
NEWS
March 2, 1989 | ERIC HARRISON, Times Staff Writer
After winning Chicago's Democratic mayoral primary, Richard M. Daley Wednesday reached out to Acting Mayor Eugene Sawyer while his staff tried to downplay the significance of the pronounced racial split in the vote. Meanwhile, black political leaders sought to regroup in the face of a split that weakened Sawyer's candidacy and depleted turnout in black wards.
NEWS
May 7, 1991 | BOB SECTER, Times Chicago Bureau Chief
There's a strange new sound echoing through the halls and back rooms of government in Chicago, where politics has so often been measured in decibels. It's called silence. For much of the last decade, Carl Sandburg's City of Big Shoulders seemed more like the Center of Crass Loudmouths. Black and white politicians united mostly in their disdain for one another and weren't afraid to say it.
NEWS
October 22, 1989 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chanting "Fight the Power" and "Racism Must Go," 1,000 protesters marched Saturday through Mayor Richard M. Daley's neighborhood, Bridgeport, to dramatize alleged police brutality and racism. The march, organized in response to several recent incidents involving the police, snaked through two predominantly white communities, Bridgeport and Canaryville, before ending near Comiskey Park, the spot where two black 14-year-old boys were picked up by police last August.
NEWS
September 30, 1989 | ERIC HARRISON and TRACY SHRYER, Times Staff Writers
Two black youths, both 14, were waiting for a bus in a white working-class neighborhood after a White Sox game. Two white police officers picked them up, the teen-agers alleged, told them blacks did not belong in that community and slapped them before dropping them off in another white neighborhood. There, they were chased and beaten by a gang of whites. One of the youths required hospitalization.
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