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Racial Relations Colorado

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December 18, 1990 | PATT MORRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a circle on the autumn grass, the six of them sat, Japanese college freshmen singing to the chords of a $400 second-hand guitar. Their English was new and hesitant, and they apologized for it to the four young men who came at them suddenly, out of the dark, demanding money. The students may not have understood the insults the four began screaming at them. But they understood very well the baseball bats and the sticks.
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NEWS
March 24, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A town hall meeting on race relations in Denver turned into a shouting match when Native Americans protested the exclusion of a representative on President Clinton's race advisory board. Energy Secretary Federico Pena tried unsuccessfully to restore order when about 20 protesters, some wearing handkerchiefs and ski masks, refused to let board member John Hope Franklin speak, demanding to know why no American Indians are on the board.
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NEWS
May 1, 1987 | United Press International
Federal agents firing tear-gas canisters into a mobile home arrested the founder of the White Patriot Party and three other reputed white supremacists Thursday, authorities said. The pre-dawn raid came less than a week after 15 suspected white supremacists were arrested in Arkansas and Colorado on a federal indictment charging them with conspiracy to overthrow the government. Among the four arrested Thursday was Glenn Miller, 46, of Raleigh, N.C.
NEWS
January 22, 1997 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tucked between 14,000-foot peaks along the Great Divide, Colorado's fabled Roaring Fork Valley has hosted many cultures: Native American, European miner, rancher, celebrity vacationer, tycoon, ski bum. Lured by the promise of jobs in Aspen's ski resort, a tide of newcomers from Mexico, Central and South America has made the region a turbulent melting pot where Anglo and Latino cultures jostle. A decade ago, only a handful of Latinos lived in the 70-mile-long valley.
NEWS
March 24, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A town hall meeting on race relations in Denver turned into a shouting match when Native Americans protested the exclusion of a representative on President Clinton's race advisory board. Energy Secretary Federico Pena tried unsuccessfully to restore order when about 20 protesters, some wearing handkerchiefs and ski masks, refused to let board member John Hope Franklin speak, demanding to know why no American Indians are on the board.
NEWS
January 22, 1997 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tucked between 14,000-foot peaks along the Great Divide, Colorado's fabled Roaring Fork Valley has hosted many cultures: Native American, European miner, rancher, celebrity vacationer, tycoon, ski bum. Lured by the promise of jobs in Aspen's ski resort, a tide of newcomers from Mexico, Central and South America has made the region a turbulent melting pot where Anglo and Latino cultures jostle. A decade ago, only a handful of Latinos lived in the 70-mile-long valley.
NEWS
December 18, 1990 | PATT MORRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a circle on the autumn grass, the six of them sat, Japanese college freshmen singing to the chords of a $400 second-hand guitar. Their English was new and hesitant, and they apologized for it to the four young men who came at them suddenly, out of the dark, demanding money. The students may not have understood the insults the four began screaming at them. But they understood very well the baseball bats and the sticks.
NEWS
May 1, 1987 | United Press International
Federal agents firing tear-gas canisters into a mobile home arrested the founder of the White Patriot Party and three other reputed white supremacists Thursday, authorities said. The pre-dawn raid came less than a week after 15 suspected white supremacists were arrested in Arkansas and Colorado on a federal indictment charging them with conspiracy to overthrow the government. Among the four arrested Thursday was Glenn Miller, 46, of Raleigh, N.C.
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