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July 8, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Police fought to restore order in the northern British city of Bradford after hours of race riots that left 80 officers injured by a hail of bricks, bottles and gasoline bombs. Five civilians were hospitalized--two with stab wounds--after violence erupted between white and South Asian youths in Bradford, where a scheduled far-right parade had been banned by police.
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NEWS
July 8, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Police fought to restore order in the northern British city of Bradford after hours of race riots that left 80 officers injured by a hail of bricks, bottles and gasoline bombs. Five civilians were hospitalized--two with stab wounds--after violence erupted between white and South Asian youths in Bradford, where a scheduled far-right parade had been banned by police.
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NEWS
December 26, 1994 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While Queen Elizabeth II sent Christmas greetings paying tribute to those seeking peace in Northern Ireland, Jesse Jackson created a controversy here Sunday with his alternative holiday message in which he compared the Conservative government and party with racism and fascism. The speeches by the queen and by Jackson, a civil rights leader and onetime American presidential candidate, aired at the same time, on separate television channels.
NEWS
June 25, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Riot police restored calm to the town of Burnley in northwestern England early today after a flare-up of racial tensions between whites and Asians. Several cars and two buildings were set on fire. The police, backed by a helicopter, were deployed to keep groups of white and Asian youths apart in the town, 20 miles northwest of Oldham--scene last month of Britain's worst race riots in a decade.
NEWS
February 25, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Britain's government Wednesday promised to overhaul the country's race laws after releasing a scathing report on the 1993 slaying of a black teenager that blames police "racism and incompetence" for failing to bring his killers to justice. The murder case is Britain's Jasper, Texas, and Rodney G.
NEWS
June 25, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Riot police restored calm to the town of Burnley in northwestern England early today after a flare-up of racial tensions between whites and Asians. Several cars and two buildings were set on fire. The police, backed by a helicopter, were deployed to keep groups of white and Asian youths apart in the town, 20 miles northwest of Oldham--scene last month of Britain's worst race riots in a decade.
NEWS
July 10, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Business was booming the other day at Rocky's, a greasy street-corner sandwich shop in the heart of one of London's worst ghettos. But few customers were there for the chicken and fries that Abdul the proprietor offered at his caged luncheon counter. Most had come for the drugs. Marijuana and hashish, mostly, sold in small quantities by the dozen or so young men who spend their days in and around Rocky's.
NEWS
May 30, 1993 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Conservative Member of Parliament Winston Churchill, grandson and namesake of Britain's wartime prime minister, set off a public outcry Saturday by calling for an urgent halt to the "relentless flow" of immigrants into Britain. Addressing a Conservative Party gathering in northern England, Churchill said that the British way of life and liberal democracy are threatened by immigration, particularly from the Indian subcontinent.
NEWS
December 5, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
British Prime Minister John Major moved quickly Tuesday to quell an embarrassing racial outbreak among some Conservatives over the selection of a black candidate in their district in the next election. "Racism has no place in the Conservative Party," Major said during the prime minister's question time before the House of Commons.
NEWS
March 23, 1998 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Empire came home to Britain on a cold June morning in 1948. Docking in London, the S.S. Empire Windrush delivered 500 passengers from Jamaica, black men in suits carrying British passports and hungry for waiting jobs. For the first time, large numbers of people who weren't white had arrived to live and work among the British at home. Fast forward to 1998.
NEWS
February 25, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Britain's government Wednesday promised to overhaul the country's race laws after releasing a scathing report on the 1993 slaying of a black teenager that blames police "racism and incompetence" for failing to bring his killers to justice. The murder case is Britain's Jasper, Texas, and Rodney G.
NEWS
March 23, 1998 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Empire came home to Britain on a cold June morning in 1948. Docking in London, the S.S. Empire Windrush delivered 500 passengers from Jamaica, black men in suits carrying British passports and hungry for waiting jobs. For the first time, large numbers of people who weren't white had arrived to live and work among the British at home. Fast forward to 1998.
NEWS
December 26, 1994 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While Queen Elizabeth II sent Christmas greetings paying tribute to those seeking peace in Northern Ireland, Jesse Jackson created a controversy here Sunday with his alternative holiday message in which he compared the Conservative government and party with racism and fascism. The speeches by the queen and by Jackson, a civil rights leader and onetime American presidential candidate, aired at the same time, on separate television channels.
NEWS
May 30, 1993 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Conservative Member of Parliament Winston Churchill, grandson and namesake of Britain's wartime prime minister, set off a public outcry Saturday by calling for an urgent halt to the "relentless flow" of immigrants into Britain. Addressing a Conservative Party gathering in northern England, Churchill said that the British way of life and liberal democracy are threatened by immigration, particularly from the Indian subcontinent.
NEWS
December 5, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
British Prime Minister John Major moved quickly Tuesday to quell an embarrassing racial outbreak among some Conservatives over the selection of a black candidate in their district in the next election. "Racism has no place in the Conservative Party," Major said during the prime minister's question time before the House of Commons.
NEWS
November 23, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Love her or hate her, few Britons would deny that Margaret Thatcher, the grocer's daughter from central England, has been the most dominant British political personality since her idol, the late Winston Churchill. The second-longest-serving British prime minister ever and the most durable in more than 160 years (since Robert Banks Jenkinson Liverpool), she profoundly transformed her country by what sometimes seemed sheer force of will.
NEWS
November 23, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Love her or hate her, few Britons would deny that Margaret Thatcher, the grocer's daughter from central England, has been the most dominant British political personality since her idol, the late Winston Churchill. The second-longest-serving British prime minister ever and the most durable in more than 160 years (since Robert Banks Jenkinson Liverpool), she profoundly transformed her country by what sometimes seemed sheer force of will.
NEWS
March 1, 1989 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
The guiding principle behind Britain's minorities policy was defined in 1966 by then-Home Secretary Roy Jenkins as "not a flattening process of assimilation but as equal opportunity accompanied by cultural diversity, in an atmosphere of mutual tolerance." Those comments, the Independent newspaper recalled the other day, "marked the point at which the authorities formally embraced multiculturalism, to which all subsequent governments have also been committed.
NEWS
July 10, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Business was booming the other day at Rocky's, a greasy street-corner sandwich shop in the heart of one of London's worst ghettos. But few customers were there for the chicken and fries that Abdul the proprietor offered at his caged luncheon counter. Most had come for the drugs. Marijuana and hashish, mostly, sold in small quantities by the dozen or so young men who spend their days in and around Rocky's.
NEWS
March 1, 1989 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
The guiding principle behind Britain's minorities policy was defined in 1966 by then-Home Secretary Roy Jenkins as "not a flattening process of assimilation but as equal opportunity accompanied by cultural diversity, in an atmosphere of mutual tolerance." Those comments, the Independent newspaper recalled the other day, "marked the point at which the authorities formally embraced multiculturalism, to which all subsequent governments have also been committed.
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