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Racial Relations Georgia

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NEWS
January 23, 1987 | DAVID TREADWELL, Times Staff Writer
Seventy-five years ago, the brutal rape of a teen-aged white girl, allegedly at the hands of three black youths, led to a reign of Ku Klux Klan terror and bloodshed that drove blacks by the hundreds out of this hilly, pine-studded county in rural northern Georgia. "Nigger, don't let the sun set on you in Forsyth County!"
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NEWS
January 31, 2001 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the whack of a gavel, the Georgia Senate on Tuesday approved a new state flag that minimizes the Confederate battle emblem and brings 45 years of a racially charged controversy to an end. The vote was supposed to be tight. But after Democratic Gov. Roy Barnes won over reluctant conservative lawmakers with a round of promises that included hanging a portrait of Robert E. Lee in the Capitol, the Senate voted, 34 to 22, for the new design.
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NEWS
July 19, 1995 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Tyrone Brooks was a child growing up in rural Georgia, he learned from his elders that the freakish outcropping of granite east of Atlanta known as Stone Mountain was a frightful--even evil--place. The Ku Klux Klan marked its rebirth early this century by torching a cross upon its peak. And in olden times, his grandmother told him, black people had been lynched and thrown from the mountaintop. "I did not grow up with a good feeling about Stone Mountain," Brooks said.
NEWS
April 23, 2000 | Associated Press
The Gwinnett Chamber of Commerce has found a way to avoid the controversy over the Confederate flag and still stay true to its state: It's flying an old Georgia flag on its building, one that predates the addition of the Confederate battle emblem. The Confederate emblem was incorporated into the Georgia flag in 1956, only two years after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled segregated schools unconstitutional.
NEWS
January 18, 1987 | Associated Press
Hundreds of Ku Klux Klan members and their supporters hurled rocks, bottles and mud on Saturday to interrupt a smaller group's "anti-intimidation march" through a county that has been all white for decades. Several of the marchers, estimated to number about 75 blacks and whites, were struck or grazed by the debris, but no serious injuries were reported. Eight members of the rock-throwing group were arrested, police said.
NEWS
January 26, 1987 | Associated Press
A day after 25,000 marchers jammed this all-white community in a demand for racial tolerance, ministers complained Sunday that Cumming had been characterized unfairly. But a counterdemonstrator, one of 56 people arrested in the South's largest civil rights demonstration since the 1960s, said he would work to oust the officials who welcomed the marchers.
NEWS
July 19, 1996 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This afternoon, shortly before the Olympic torch begins the last leg of its journey to the city's new stadium to signal the start of the XXV Olympiad, another smaller, ragtag relay will begin at the crypt of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Away from the cheering masses, runners will carry the flame through an African American neighborhood that has seen better days and on to the steps of the state Capitol.
NEWS
February 2, 1987 | DAVID TREADWELL, Times Staff Writer
Eight days after leading a 25,000-strong civil rights demonstration in all-white Forsyth County, the Rev. Hosea Williams returned here Sunday with a band of mostly black followers from Atlanta--this time not to protest but to pray. Williams, trading his blue marching dungarees for a black Sunday suit, headed a group of 50 to 75 civil rights activists who arrived here in a 20-car entourage and then split up in teams to attend services at eight churches.
SPORTS
July 30, 1990 | From Staff and Wire Reports
In 1969, anti-apartheid demonstrators at the PGA Championship threw a drink in Gary Player's face. Now, Player is siding with protesters. The South African golfer said Sunday that he supports people who plan to demonstrate at the PGA Championship in Birmingham, Ala., to protest the host club's all-white status. "If I was in those peoples' shoes I would also demonstrate," said Player. "That's the advantage of a free society; people are entitled to demonstrate."
NEWS
December 9, 1995 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One soldier apparently has told police that he and his buddies set out with a semiautomatic weapon hunting for black people. No, said another, they merely wanted to harass drug dealers and prostitutes. Whatever their intention, when the hunt was over early Thursday, two black people were dead in Fayetteville, N.C., shot without provocation by white soldiers from Ft. Bragg, according to authorities. The two Army privates were charged Friday with first-degree murder.
NEWS
July 19, 1996 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This afternoon, shortly before the Olympic torch begins the last leg of its journey to the city's new stadium to signal the start of the XXV Olympiad, another smaller, ragtag relay will begin at the crypt of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Away from the cheering masses, runners will carry the flame through an African American neighborhood that has seen better days and on to the steps of the state Capitol.
NEWS
December 9, 1995 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One soldier apparently has told police that he and his buddies set out with a semiautomatic weapon hunting for black people. No, said another, they merely wanted to harass drug dealers and prostitutes. Whatever their intention, when the hunt was over early Thursday, two black people were dead in Fayetteville, N.C., shot without provocation by white soldiers from Ft. Bragg, according to authorities. The two Army privates were charged Friday with first-degree murder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1995 | Bill Boyarsky
For Richard Belcher, anchor-reporter of Atlanta's WSB-TV, covering the O.J. Simpson murder trial requires more than just getting the news. He also has to make sure the camera catches his "mike flag," the small box on the microphone identifying the station, as he asks a question. For Belcher's presence at the trial is part of the station's efforts to promote itself in the highly competitive Atlanta television market. But his assignment is more complex than flying his station's flag.
NEWS
August 16, 1995 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For almost 20 years, the man formerly known as H. Rap Brown has lived a quiet life in southeast Atlanta where he has operated a small grocery store and presided over a fast-growing Muslim community. But, with his arrest last week in connection with a shooting, his past as a fiery leader in the Black Panther Party who once called violence "as American as cherry pie," came flying back.
NEWS
July 19, 1995 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Tyrone Brooks was a child growing up in rural Georgia, he learned from his elders that the freakish outcropping of granite east of Atlanta known as Stone Mountain was a frightful--even evil--place. The Ku Klux Klan marked its rebirth early this century by torching a cross upon its peak. And in olden times, his grandmother told him, black people had been lynched and thrown from the mountaintop. "I did not grow up with a good feeling about Stone Mountain," Brooks said.
NEWS
May 29, 1992 | ERIC HARRISON and EDITH STANLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
More than a century after the end of the Civil War, the governor of Georgia thinks it is time to lower the Confederate battle flag for good. Bowing to pressure from civil rights groups and others who called the emblem offensive and an embarrassment to the state, Gov. Zell Miller said Thursday he will introduce a measure when the Legislature convenes in January to change the Georgia flag, which currently incorporates the striking red and blue design of the Confederacy.
NEWS
February 11, 1987 | Associated Press
Seven whites were indicted Tuesday for their roles in an attack on civil rights demonstrators who were pelted with rocks and debris when they marched last month through a county where no blacks live. The seven were among an estimated 400 Ku Klux Klan members and their supporters who demonstrated Jan. 17 against about 75 marchers being led through Forsyth County by civil rights activist the Rev. Hosea Williams.
NEWS
August 2, 1987 | Associated Press
A march of more than 100 Ku Klux Klan members and their supporters went off without incident Saturday in this Forsyth County town, which was the site of a major civil rights demonstration earlier this year. The marchers, more than half of whom wore the white robes of the segregationist organization, paraded 1 1/2 miles to the town square, where they were met by about 35 spectators and a number of law enforcement officers.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | Associated Press
For the first time since 1951, police on Saturday did not stop members of the Ku Klux Klan from donning face masks for a march. Several dozen klan members and members of other white supremacist groups gathered amid heavy security. The state's 1951 anti-mask law, which prevents concealment of identity in public places, was ruled unconstitutional in May by a state court judge in Gwinnet County. Georgia Atty. Gen.
SPORTS
July 30, 1990 | From Staff and Wire Reports
In 1969, anti-apartheid demonstrators at the PGA Championship threw a drink in Gary Player's face. Now, Player is siding with protesters. The South African golfer said Sunday that he supports people who plan to demonstrate at the PGA Championship in Birmingham, Ala., to protest the host club's all-white status. "If I was in those peoples' shoes I would also demonstrate," said Player. "That's the advantage of a free society; people are entitled to demonstrate."
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