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Racial Relations Japan

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NEWS
November 19, 1995 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his search for an apartment, every day was the same for Yoyok Ikhsan, an Indonesian exchange student in Japan. Before he could get his head through the door of a real estate office, the agent would rise and say the dreaded words: Gaijin wa dame . No foreigners here. Finally his school found a place that would take him--a bathless, cockroach-infested room little larger than a VW bus. Gratefully, he moved in.
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NEWS
November 19, 1995 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his search for an apartment, every day was the same for Yoyok Ikhsan, an Indonesian exchange student in Japan. Before he could get his head through the door of a real estate office, the agent would rise and say the dreaded words: Gaijin wa dame . No foreigners here. Finally his school found a place that would take him--a bathless, cockroach-infested room little larger than a VW bus. Gratefully, he moved in.
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NEWS
July 21, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"They steal the children's bicycles and hang around the telephone boxes," says Hachiro Nakano while slurping down a lunch of cold noodles. "They have dark skin," she adds sliding four fingers down her cheeks. "It gives me the creeps." Says a salesclerk at a 7-Eleven convenience store, "They are always in the park on weekends, so I walk around the side to avoid them."
SPORTS
April 24, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Japanese officials went to great lengths to deny a charge by an American Samoan from Hawaii that racism was blocking him from sumo wrestling's highest ranking. Koichi Kato, the government's chief spokesman, insisted that sumo promotions were based entirely on ability. "I hope officials concerned will see to it that the American people understand," Kato said. Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa was quoted by Japanese media as saying he didn't believe there was discrimination in the sumo world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1989 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
A 17-day American fact-finding trip by a Japanese family waging a do-it-yourself fight against anti-black racism in their country has had an unhappy ending in Los Angeles. Luggage containing journals and videotapes chronicling the family's visits with such prominent blacks as the Rev. Jesse Jackson, Atlanta Mayor Andrew Young, Coretta Scott King and Baltimore Orioles baseball manager Frank Robinson disappeared moments after their arrival at Los Angeles International Airport.
NEWS
May 31, 1988 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
Choi Sun-ae hopes to board a plane in Los Angeles today and go home to Japan. But she does not know whether she will be allowed to re-enter her country. She has no entry permit. Choi, a 28-year-old graduate student at Indiana University, was born in Japan. She is, in fact, a third-generation Japanese. But she has no Japanese passport because Japanese law does not recognize her as a citizen. In her native Japan, Choi is legally a Korean.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1988 | DAVID FREED, Times Staff Writer
Samud got a plastic gorilla pen, a bear-shaped eraser and an elephant coin holder for Christmas. Tritia got a necklace, some perfumed soap and fancy stationery. They don't have jolly old St. Nick to thank for their gifts. They have the Japanese. The two fifth-graders were among about 500 children, most of them black and Latino, who gathered Thursday at a Los Angeles elementary school to accept presents and, in essence, an apology from Sanrio Inc. of Japan.
NEWS
June 1, 1988 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
Choi Sun-Ae's attempt to challenge a Japanese law requiring the fingerprinting and registering of "foreigners" was rebuffed Tuesday when airline officials at Los Angeles International Airport refused to allow her to board a flight to Tokyo. Choi, 28, is one of an estimated 20,000 Japanese-Koreans who have refused to be fingerprinted in the 1980s since a protest movement began. Koreans, numbering about 700,000, are by far Japan's largest ethnic minority group.
NEWS
August 3, 1989 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, Times Staff Writer
A group of black players for the visiting Los Angeles Rams encountered what they called racial bias here when they were turned away from several downtown nightclubs and were refused taxi service in a driving rainstorm this week. "It felt almost like going back to slavery, with no blacks allowed," said an angry defensive back Doug Reed, who added that he encountered a much friendlier reception here in 1981, when he played in the Mirage Bowl while attending San Diego State University.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Ambassador Michael H. Armacost denied Thursday that American racism is creating a backlash against Japan's investments in the United States but warned the Japanese that they must improve their track record to combat anti-investment sentiment. The warning was delivered in a speech to a conference of business and political leaders from Texas and Japan. "There should be no question--the welcome mat is still out," Armacost assured the Japanese.
NEWS
July 21, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"They steal the children's bicycles and hang around the telephone boxes," says Hachiro Nakano while slurping down a lunch of cold noodles. "They have dark skin," she adds sliding four fingers down her cheeks. "It gives me the creeps." Says a salesclerk at a 7-Eleven convenience store, "They are always in the park on weekends, so I walk around the side to avoid them."
NEWS
December 13, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The NAACP last week quietly ended its "informational picket line" at the Japanese Embassy here after two months of demanding a halt to Japanese slurs against blacks, but the group intends to keep pressuring Japanese government and industry. The protest followed remarks by Japanese Justice Minister Seiroku Kajiyama comparing blacks to Tokyo prostitutes. Both "ruin the atmosphere (of neighborhoods) in the same way," he said.
NEWS
May 26, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean President Roh Tae Woo urged Japan on Friday to open its markets to Korean goods, and he also warned that it must eliminate discrimination against its 700,000 Korean residents. Speaking in Parliament, Roh asked Japan to try to correct its "chronic trade imbalance" with South Korea using "similar determination" that it has shown in its efforts to open Japanese markets to the United States and Europe.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean President Roh Tae Woo arrived here today for a controversial state visit that is arousing intense emotions in both Japan and South Korea over the bitter historical legacy shared by the Asian neighbors. Roh set the tone of his three-day visit on May 14 when he told Japanese reporters in Seoul that he hopes Emperor Akihito will make a clear-cut apology to South Koreans for Japan's 1910-1945 colonization of the Korean Peninsula.
NEWS
January 1, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A chance encounter on a suburban train one recent Sunday sheds some awkward light on the elusive problem of racism in Japan. It began when a little Japanese girl pointed with fascination at a black woman and asked, "Daddy, what's that?" The father squirmed with embarrassment. He tried to satisfy the innocent curiosity of his preschool daughter by reminding her of an old Chinese fable known in Japan as "Saiyuki."
BUSINESS
November 15, 1989 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Immediately after the news hit that a Japanese company was selling Little Black Sambo beachwear and toys in Japan last year, Ron Wakabayashi began getting furious calls from blacks. One caller to the Japanese American Citizens League national headquarters in San Francisco threatened to circulate racist caricatures of Japanese. Others cursed the JACL national director and hung up.
NEWS
May 26, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean President Roh Tae Woo urged Japan on Friday to open its markets to Korean goods, and he also warned that it must eliminate discrimination against its 700,000 Korean residents. Speaking in Parliament, Roh asked Japan to try to correct its "chronic trade imbalance" with South Korea using "similar determination" that it has shown in its efforts to open Japanese markets to the United States and Europe.
SPORTS
April 24, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Japanese officials went to great lengths to deny a charge by an American Samoan from Hawaii that racism was blocking him from sumo wrestling's highest ranking. Koichi Kato, the government's chief spokesman, insisted that sumo promotions were based entirely on ability. "I hope officials concerned will see to it that the American people understand," Kato said. Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa was quoted by Japanese media as saying he didn't believe there was discrimination in the sumo world.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Ambassador Michael H. Armacost denied Thursday that American racism is creating a backlash against Japan's investments in the United States but warned the Japanese that they must improve their track record to combat anti-investment sentiment. The warning was delivered in a speech to a conference of business and political leaders from Texas and Japan. "There should be no question--the welcome mat is still out," Armacost assured the Japanese.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1989
Missing luggage containing documents that chronicle a Japanese family's fight against black racism in their country has been recovered, Los Angeles officials said Friday. Bags containing journals and videotapes detailing the campaign led by the family of Toshiji Arita were found in a trash bin near Los Angeles International Airport, a spokeswoman for Mayor Tom Bradley said.
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