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Racial Relations Kuwait

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April 9, 1991 | TOM FURLONG and DAVID FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
He was born and raised in Kuwait. He married here, had two children and has toiled for more than 10 years at the same cake plant, where he worked his way up to marketing manager. But Ahmed, whose parents came from Palestine nearly a half-century ago, cannot vote and cannot own real estate in Kuwait. He is not a citizen by Kuwaiti law and has no chance of ever becoming one--nor do his children. And he is fed up. "This . . . place, these people. I give everything--everything!"
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NEWS
July 16, 1991 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In elegant, marble-tiled villas in this city built on oil and ease, the dinner talk is of reconstruction projects. The top priority, people say, is a new highway south to Saudi Arabia with six lanes--one way. It is only partly a joke. A striking number of Kuwait's brightest, best-educated citizens, deeply demoralized by the postwar political climate, say they plan to leave the country. Many who stay are hedging their bets, opening bank accounts in dollars and buying houses overseas.
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NEWS
July 26, 1987 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Last week, the father of a young man who was killed while trying to rig a car bomb in one of Kuwait's fashionable shopping areas apologized for his son's deed by buying space for a letter on the front page of a local newspaper. "I denounce all acts of terrorism, subversion and violence," wrote Suleiman Salah Attar, "and if what happened was intended to harm Kuwait and its people, then God has been just in his punishment."
NEWS
April 9, 1991 | TOM FURLONG and DAVID FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
He was born and raised in Kuwait. He married here, had two children and has toiled for more than 10 years at the same cake plant, where he worked his way up to marketing manager. But Ahmed, whose parents came from Palestine nearly a half-century ago, cannot vote and cannot own real estate in Kuwait. He is not a citizen by Kuwaiti law and has no chance of ever becoming one--nor do his children. And he is fed up. "This . . . place, these people. I give everything--everything!"
NEWS
July 16, 1991 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In elegant, marble-tiled villas in this city built on oil and ease, the dinner talk is of reconstruction projects. The top priority, people say, is a new highway south to Saudi Arabia with six lanes--one way. It is only partly a joke. A striking number of Kuwait's brightest, best-educated citizens, deeply demoralized by the postwar political climate, say they plan to leave the country. Many who stay are hedging their bets, opening bank accounts in dollars and buying houses overseas.
NEWS
July 26, 1987 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Last week, the father of a young man who was killed while trying to rig a car bomb in one of Kuwait's fashionable shopping areas apologized for his son's deed by buying space for a letter on the front page of a local newspaper. "I denounce all acts of terrorism, subversion and violence," wrote Suleiman Salah Attar, "and if what happened was intended to harm Kuwait and its people, then God has been just in his punishment."
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