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Racial Relations Louisiana

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NEWS
September 22, 1988 | Associated Press
Heavily armed policemen sealed off a 12-block area Wednesday night after hearing sporadic gunfire in a riot-scarred neighborhood where a white woman allegedly shot a black man to death 24 hours earlier. An emergency zone was expanded late Wednesday night in the Cedar Grove section soon after police rerouted traffic off a busy thoroughfare where blacks were throwing stones, bottles and bricks at passing cars.
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NEWS
February 15, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
In the latest symbol of slowly eroding social and racial barriers in New Orleans, a middle-aged white businessman in gaudy gold crown and page-boy wig intends to exchange formal greetings with a black Mardi Gras king on the waterfront. The formal meeting scheduled for tonight is believed to be the first for the two make-believe monarchs: Rex, King of Carnival, whose secretive, high-society organization dates back to 1872, and King Zulu of the Zulu Social Aid and Pleasure Club, founded in 1909.
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NEWS
December 7, 1992 | GARRY BOULARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A 20-foot-tall granite monument commemorating a historic battle has become the object of heat and controversy here. Erected in 1891, only to be hauled away to a suburban warehouse a century later, the Liberty Monument will almost certainly be returned to public view by early 1993, city officials say. But those same officials claim they'd be just as happy if somehow the monument just disappeared.
NEWS
June 15, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
In the third such incident reported in a week, a black man told authorities he was dragged alongside a car by three white men who taunted him with racial epithets. The incident comes after a black man was dragged to death behind a pickup in Jasper, Texas, and a black teenager in Belleville, Ill., reported he was dragged alongside a truck driven by three white youths yelling racial slurs.
NEWS
December 24, 1992 | From The Washington Post
Louisiana on Wednesday became the second Southern state ordered by a federal judge to overhaul its university system, where whites and blacks still largely attend separate colleges. "Simply put, the dubious ideal of 'separate but equal,' whether endorsed by whites or blacks, is an anachronism that our society no longer tolerates," U.S. District Judge Charles Schwartz said in his ruling.
NEWS
February 24, 1987
Officials in a predominantly white suburb of New Orleans dropped their vow to rebuild barricades erected last week on two streets leading to a mostly black New Orleans neighborhood, as the two cities agreed to work to reduce crime in the area. Robert Evans Jr., head of the Jefferson Parish Council, said the biggest reason for his decision was a state Transportation Department letter telling him he could not legally barricade a state highway.
NEWS
June 15, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
In the third such incident reported in a week, a black man told authorities he was dragged alongside a car by three white men who taunted him with racial epithets. The incident comes after a black man was dragged to death behind a pickup in Jasper, Texas, and a black teenager in Belleville, Ill., reported he was dragged alongside a truck driven by three white youths yelling racial slurs.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In an election seen across the nation as a test of race relations, Democratic Sen. J. Bennett Johnston narrowly won reelection Saturday, turning aside a surprisingly stubborn challenge from state Rep. David Duke, a former grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan. But Duke refused to concede defeat Saturday night, and his powerful showing immediately sparked predictions that he would bid for another high office as soon as next year.
NEWS
February 15, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
In the latest symbol of slowly eroding social and racial barriers in New Orleans, a middle-aged white businessman in gaudy gold crown and page-boy wig intends to exchange formal greetings with a black Mardi Gras king on the waterfront. The formal meeting scheduled for tonight is believed to be the first for the two make-believe monarchs: Rex, King of Carnival, whose secretive, high-society organization dates back to 1872, and King Zulu of the Zulu Social Aid and Pleasure Club, founded in 1909.
NEWS
June 9, 1993 | GARY BOULARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Richard Bell looks at the Liberty Monument these days, he thinks of former Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard David Duke and becomes angry. "Duke has used us and taken advantage of a delicate situation for his own political purposes," said Bell, president of the Louisiana Historical Society. "We completely disassociate ourselves from Mr. Duke and his agenda." Bell's problem is that he is trying to make an evenhanded case for keeping the Liberty Monument on public view in New Orleans.
NEWS
December 24, 1992 | From The Washington Post
Louisiana on Wednesday became the second Southern state ordered by a federal judge to overhaul its university system, where whites and blacks still largely attend separate colleges. "Simply put, the dubious ideal of 'separate but equal,' whether endorsed by whites or blacks, is an anachronism that our society no longer tolerates," U.S. District Judge Charles Schwartz said in his ruling.
NEWS
December 7, 1992 | GARRY BOULARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A 20-foot-tall granite monument commemorating a historic battle has become the object of heat and controversy here. Erected in 1891, only to be hauled away to a suburban warehouse a century later, the Liberty Monument will almost certainly be returned to public view by early 1993, city officials say. But those same officials claim they'd be just as happy if somehow the monument just disappeared.
NEWS
July 24, 1991 | GARRY BOULARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Behind the gray, forbidding walls of the Louisiana State Penitentiary here, Gary Tyler's 16-year-old dream lies undiminished: to be freed of a murder he says he never committed, a murder that put him on Death Row despite what many legal experts believe was a deeply flawed criminal investigation and trial. In a racially tinged case that has sharply divided public opinion, Tyler's fate depends on Gov. Buddy Roemer, a conservative Republican facing a bruising reelection fight this fall.
NEWS
November 17, 1990 | PATRICK THOMAS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pat Robertson, the television evangelist who sought the Republican presidential nomination in 1988, says he is urging his Louisiana supporters--a dominant force in the state GOP here--to investigate alleged racist activities of state Rep. David Duke, a former Ku Klux Klan leader. Duke, elected as a Republican to the Louisiana Legislature in 1989, ran a surprisingly strong second in the U.S. Senate race here last month, and he has indicated that he may run for governor next year.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In an election seen across the nation as a test of race relations, Democratic Sen. J. Bennett Johnston narrowly won reelection Saturday, turning aside a surprisingly stubborn challenge from state Rep. David Duke, a former grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan. But Duke refused to concede defeat Saturday night, and his powerful showing immediately sparked predictions that he would bid for another high office as soon as next year.
NEWS
February 20, 1989 | ROBERT SHOGAN, Times Political Writer
The election of David Duke, former Ku Klux Klan leader and recent convert to Republicanism, to the Louisiana Legislature on Saturday could hardly have come at a worse time for the GOP--just as its high command was launching a much heralded effort to broaden the party by reaching out to blacks and other minorities.
NEWS
February 22, 1987 | Associated Press
Mayor Sidney Barthelemy ordered city workers Saturday to remove two steel barricades that block automobile access from a mostly black section of the city to a mostly white suburb. "I can't stand for it," Barthelemy said after dispatching workers to remove the barricades, strips of steel railing affixed to wooden posts sunk in the ground.
NEWS
October 5, 1990 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Louisiana voters go to the polls Saturday in a turbulent Senate primary that both parties here view as a political watershed for the state, and perhaps the nation. At stake is far more than the reelection of Democratic Sen. J. Bennett Johnston. With Republican State Rep.
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