Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRacial Relations Massachusetts
IN THE NEWS

Racial Relations Massachusetts

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The donations to the Carol DiMaiti Stuart Foundation Inc. have come in small increments, often as little as $5. With the checks come prayers and letters that tear at the emotions of a family that has already seen its heart ripped to shreds. "I am 70 years old and living on a fixed income, otherwise my check would be for a larger amount," wrote a woman who enclosed $10. "I had a beautiful 26-year-old daughter who was murdered by her husband, and I believe I know the heartache of her family."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 26, 1992 | CHRISTOPHER J. DALY, WASHINGTON POST
Once again, the issue here is race. According to authorities, the latest episode began about 2 a.m. last Saturday, after the subway had closed, when a black man left an office Christmas party and entered a taxi near Quincy Market, even then a bright, busy shopping area. He asked the driver to take him about three miles to his home in Roxbury, a predominantly black neighborhood. The driver, a white woman, refused, telling him Roxbury was too dangerous and that he should get out of her cab.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 15, 1988
Black, Latino, American Indian and Asian students occupying a University of Massachusetts building in Amherst for the third day said a church had pledged money and restaurants had donated hot meals. "We haven't even had to leave the building to buy food," said Rio Gabriel, 21, a junior from Toronto.
NEWS
November 24, 1990 | From Associated Press
A judge denied bail Friday for one of five juveniles charged in the Halloween rape and murder of a 26-year-old woman, and a black leader called for the police commissioner's ouster. "At this point in time, I think that he should be tried as a juvenile," said the youth's attorney, Juliane Balliro, after a closed hearing in Suffolk Superior Court. "He is 15 years of age and he has no prior criminal involvement whatsoever."
NEWS
October 9, 1989
Vandals spray-painted a swath of swastikas and racial slurs across Wellesley, Mass., defacing a new downtown building, mailboxes, garages, homes and cars over a mile-long trail. Messages included racist, white supremacist, anti-Semitic and anti-police slogans as well as swastikas, said Wellesley Police dispatcher Michael Gerard.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writer
It is only an isolated case, but to those who remember the first few puzzling illnesses in the early 1980s that presaged the AIDS epidemic, it raises some familiar, troubling issues. As they were then, public health officials are dealing with the possibility of a deadly threat that respects no one's politics or privacy. But even the public discussion of this microscopic invader raises equally potent dangers of overreaction and of subjecting a vulnerable minority to crippling stereotypes.
NEWS
February 24, 1987 | Associated Press
The University of Massachusetts at Boston is investigating a rash of anti-Semitic incidents on campus, including the appearance of swastikas on doors and bulletin boards, and letters sent to two faculty members, officials said Monday. "We consider them to be a series of isolated incidents and not reflective at all of the general tone on the campus," said Robert A. Corrigan, the university's chancellor.
NEWS
January 12, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost from the start, journalists here had whispered among themselves that there were holes in Charles Stuart's bizarre tale of the mysterious black gunman who had murdered his pregnant wife and the son she was carrying. However, until Stuart's own brother brought forward startling new evidence implicating Stuart, and Stuart himself apparently committed suicide last week, none of those suspicions made it into their coverage.
NEWS
January 15, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A boycott of Boston's two major newspapers was called by a group of minorities to protest "racist attitudes" in the investigation of the slaying of a city furrier's pregnant wife. The Boston Boycott Committee, which calls itself a grass-roots group of blacks and other minorities, urged a boycott of the Boston Globe and the Boston Herald from today to Jan. 22.
NEWS
July 12, 1988
Boston took a step toward integrating its public housing as two black families moved into a project in South Boston, a mostly white neighborhood that was torn by rioting during school desegregation in the mid-1970s. The two single mothers and their children settled into the Mary Ellen McCormack development without incident, becoming the only blacks in South Boston public housing and the first to move into the 1,016-unit facility in a decade, officials said.
NEWS
June 24, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT and KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Old North Church bell tolled a welcome for Nelson Mandela in the birthplace of the American revolution Saturday as more than a quarter of a million whites and blacks turned out to cheer the black liberation leader whom Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.) hailed as "the statesman of our time." Mandela's limousine, in a thick sandwich of security, sped through racially troubled Boston--from a high school rally to a lunch with Sen.
NEWS
April 28, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In recent days, a two-year-old plan to desegregate South Boston's all-white housing projects has evoked the emotions and angry rhetoric that ignited bloody riots during this racially tense city's school desegregation crisis of the mid-1970s. "The problem is, our kids who got screwed in the busing are getting screwed in housing," Leo Keaney, chairman of the Old Colony housing project tenants group, complained Friday. "When the hell does it stop? They keep coming at this community.
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The donations to the Carol DiMaiti Stuart Foundation Inc. have come in small increments, often as little as $5. With the checks come prayers and letters that tear at the emotions of a family that has already seen its heart ripped to shreds. "I am 70 years old and living on a fixed income, otherwise my check would be for a larger amount," wrote a woman who enclosed $10. "I had a beautiful 26-year-old daughter who was murdered by her husband, and I believe I know the heartache of her family."
NEWS
January 15, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A boycott of Boston's two major newspapers was called by a group of minorities to protest "racist attitudes" in the investigation of the slaying of a city furrier's pregnant wife. The Boston Boycott Committee, which calls itself a grass-roots group of blacks and other minorities, urged a boycott of the Boston Globe and the Boston Herald from today to Jan. 22.
NEWS
January 12, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost from the start, journalists here had whispered among themselves that there were holes in Charles Stuart's bizarre tale of the mysterious black gunman who had murdered his pregnant wife and the son she was carrying. However, until Stuart's own brother brought forward startling new evidence implicating Stuart, and Stuart himself apparently committed suicide last week, none of those suspicions made it into their coverage.
NEWS
January 10, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The full story of the murder of Carol Stuart and the son she was carrying may never be known, because Charles Stuart Jr. is dead now too, apparently having jumped from a bridge last Thursday upon learning that he had become the chief suspect. But even as Boston police untangle the latest bizarre twists in a crime that has riveted the nation, this city is grappling with its anger and confusion. "Boston got hoodwinked. There's no question about it," Mayor Raymond L. Flynn says.
NEWS
January 5, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY and DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A man who was considered the tragic victim of a brutal, racially tinged crime in which his wife and unborn baby were fatally wounded apparently hurled himself off a bridge to his death Thursday after learning that he had become the chief suspect in the October shooting. The drowned body of Charles Stuart was recovered from Boston Harbor on Thursday afternoon shortly after Suffolk County Dist. Atty.
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | From Associated Press
The family of Charles Stuart Jr. came out of seclusion Saturday to bury the man whose younger brother linked him to one of Boston's most baffling and still unraveling crime cases. "Forgive whatever wrongs he may have done," Father Richard Messina said during services for Stuart. "We cannot explain why the events of the past took place and certainly we can never understand them."
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | From Associated Press
The family of Charles Stuart Jr. came out of seclusion Saturday to bury the man whose younger brother linked him to one of Boston's most baffling and still unraveling crime cases. "Forgive whatever wrongs he may have done," Father Richard Messina said during services for Stuart. "We cannot explain why the events of the past took place and certainly we can never understand them."
NEWS
January 5, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY and DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A man who was considered the tragic victim of a brutal, racially tinged crime in which his wife and unborn baby were fatally wounded apparently hurled himself off a bridge to his death Thursday after learning that he had become the chief suspect in the October shooting. The drowned body of Charles Stuart was recovered from Boston Harbor on Thursday afternoon shortly after Suffolk County Dist. Atty.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|