Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRacial Relations Mississippi
IN THE NEWS

Racial Relations Mississippi

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
Black parents agreed to send their children to class Tuesday for the first time in two weeks after reaching a compromise over the school board's renaming of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Elementary. Under the agreement, the school will be known officially as West Lowndes Elementary, but the building itself will be named for the slain civil rights leader. The compromise was approved Monday by the Lowndes County School Board, the parents association and the county's NAACP.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 5, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The federal government accused a white Mississippi man of threatening to set his dogs on a black couple and to incite a white neighbor who owns a gun shop because the couple wanted to move into the neighborhood. "Racism is alive and well in America today," Andrew Cuomo, secretary of Housing and Urban Development, said as he announced the action. Chris Hope of Brandon, Miss.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 18, 1998 | From Newsday
The state of Mississippi on Tuesday made public the files, secret for four decades, of the now-defunct State Sovereignty Commission, an agency formed to oppose desegregation and long accused of spying on and harassing civil-rights activists in Mississippi from 1956 to 1977. The files showed that the commission had, indeed, spied on such figures as civil-rights leaders Medgar Evers and Martin Luther King Jr.
NEWS
July 30, 2000 | From Associated Press
Sheriff's deputies investigating the hanging death of a young black man have seized his computer, hoping to find evidence on its hard drive that will indicate whether the death was a suicide or murder. Raynard Johnson, 17, was found dead June 16. Two autopsies--one commissioned by the family--showed Johnson's injuries were consistent with suicide. Johnson's family, joined by the Rev.
NEWS
March 17, 1987
Black students returned to classes in Senatobia, Miss., ending a 14-day boycott, and a black leader says the heat now will be on white firms. The boycott began Feb. 17 after the school board hired a white assistant superintendent. Blacks said the board--three whites and two blacks--reneged on a pledge to hire a black. White school board members said they only promised to hire a black if a qualified candidate could be found.
NEWS
December 5, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The federal government accused a white Mississippi man of threatening to set his dogs on a black couple and to incite a white neighbor who owns a gun shop because the couple wanted to move into the neighborhood. "Racism is alive and well in America today," Andrew Cuomo, secretary of Housing and Urban Development, said as he announced the action. Chris Hope of Brandon, Miss.
NEWS
July 30, 2000 | From Associated Press
Sheriff's deputies investigating the hanging death of a young black man have seized his computer, hoping to find evidence on its hard drive that will indicate whether the death was a suicide or murder. Raynard Johnson, 17, was found dead June 16. Two autopsies--one commissioned by the family--showed Johnson's injuries were consistent with suicide. Johnson's family, joined by the Rev.
NEWS
November 1, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Authorities declared a state of emergency in the Mississippi Delta town of Leland after hundreds of angry residents rioted over the mysterious death of a black motorist. After surveying a trail of damaged police cars and businesses, Mayor Sam Thomas imposed a 6 p.m.-to-6 a.m. curfew through the weekend. Leland is a town of about 6,300 people on the western cusp of the state's impoverished Delta region.
SPORTS
August 18, 1990 | BILL GLAUBER, BALTIMORE SUN
This is the story of a Rebel heart and a Southern miracle. On Oct. 28, 1989, Chucky Mullins took the last three steps of his life on a football field for the University of Mississippi. He crashed helmet-first into a Vanderbilt receiver and dropped to the field like a rag doll, his neck broken, his body paralyzed. In that one moment, a man's tragedy became Mississippi's tragedy. A man's hardship became a state's responsibility. It didn't matter that Mullins was poor and black.
MAGAZINE
January 10, 1993 | JACK NELSON, Jack Nelson is The Times' Washington bureau chief. This article was adapted from "Terror in the Night: The Klan's Campaign Against the Jews," published this month by Simon and Schuster
A LITTLE PAST 10 P.M., THE SHOCK OF AN ENORmous explosion shook Al Binder's antebellum home in a fashionable section of Jackson, literally lifting him out of bed. Instantly the young lawyer was wide awake. His synagogue, Temple Beth Israel, was only half a mile away and because of all the Klan threats against the Jewish community he immediately figured it had been bombed. He worried about Rabbi Perry Nussbaum, who often worked late.
NEWS
March 18, 1998 | From Newsday
The state of Mississippi on Tuesday made public the files, secret for four decades, of the now-defunct State Sovereignty Commission, an agency formed to oppose desegregation and long accused of spying on and harassing civil-rights activists in Mississippi from 1956 to 1977. The files showed that the commission had, indeed, spied on such figures as civil-rights leaders Medgar Evers and Martin Luther King Jr.
NEWS
November 1, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Authorities declared a state of emergency in the Mississippi Delta town of Leland after hundreds of angry residents rioted over the mysterious death of a black motorist. After surveying a trail of damaged police cars and businesses, Mayor Sam Thomas imposed a 6 p.m.-to-6 a.m. curfew through the weekend. Leland is a town of about 6,300 people on the western cusp of the state's impoverished Delta region.
MAGAZINE
January 10, 1993 | JACK NELSON, Jack Nelson is The Times' Washington bureau chief. This article was adapted from "Terror in the Night: The Klan's Campaign Against the Jews," published this month by Simon and Schuster
A LITTLE PAST 10 P.M., THE SHOCK OF AN ENORmous explosion shook Al Binder's antebellum home in a fashionable section of Jackson, literally lifting him out of bed. Instantly the young lawyer was wide awake. His synagogue, Temple Beth Israel, was only half a mile away and because of all the Klan threats against the Jewish community he immediately figured it had been bombed. He worried about Rabbi Perry Nussbaum, who often worked late.
NEWS
October 22, 1992 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a time of night riders, lynchings, threatening phone calls in the night, colored entrances, drinking fountains and "You want to register to do what , boy?" Medgar Evers bought a car with a V-8 engine so he could outrun anything on the road. The 37-year-old NAACP official expected to die, was prepared to die, his wife and friends insist. But if he could help it, he was not going to be an easy mark. They got him one June night in 1963, the night President John F.
SPORTS
August 18, 1990 | BILL GLAUBER, BALTIMORE SUN
This is the story of a Rebel heart and a Southern miracle. On Oct. 28, 1989, Chucky Mullins took the last three steps of his life on a football field for the University of Mississippi. He crashed helmet-first into a Vanderbilt receiver and dropped to the field like a rag doll, his neck broken, his body paralyzed. In that one moment, a man's tragedy became Mississippi's tragedy. A man's hardship became a state's responsibility. It didn't matter that Mullins was poor and black.
SPORTS
October 17, 1989 | PETE THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charged with trying to forfeit a football game against another team that has a black player on its roster, East Holmes Academy, an all-white private high school of about 450 students just outside West, Miss., has become the center of a racial controversy and must either play the game or lose its membership in the Mississippi Private School Assn.
SPORTS
October 17, 1989 | PETE THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charged with trying to forfeit a football game against another team that has a black player on its roster, East Holmes Academy, an all-white private high school of about 450 students just outside West, Miss., has become the center of a racial controversy and must either play the game or lose its membership in the Mississippi Private School Assn.
NEWS
October 22, 1992 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a time of night riders, lynchings, threatening phone calls in the night, colored entrances, drinking fountains and "You want to register to do what , boy?" Medgar Evers bought a car with a V-8 engine so he could outrun anything on the road. The 37-year-old NAACP official expected to die, was prepared to die, his wife and friends insist. But if he could help it, he was not going to be an easy mark. They got him one June night in 1963, the night President John F.
NEWS
September 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
Black parents agreed to send their children to class Tuesday for the first time in two weeks after reaching a compromise over the school board's renaming of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Elementary. Under the agreement, the school will be known officially as West Lowndes Elementary, but the building itself will be named for the slain civil rights leader. The compromise was approved Monday by the Lowndes County School Board, the parents association and the county's NAACP.
NEWS
March 17, 1987
Black students returned to classes in Senatobia, Miss., ending a 14-day boycott, and a black leader says the heat now will be on white firms. The boycott began Feb. 17 after the school board hired a white assistant superintendent. Blacks said the board--three whites and two blacks--reneged on a pledge to hire a black. White school board members said they only promised to hire a black if a qualified candidate could be found.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|