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NEWS
August 30, 1989 | From United Press International
Community leaders worked the streets Tuesday to defuse racial tensions that led to the arrest of 30 black and Latino youths in a rock-throwing protest over a white police officer's killing of a black suspected drug dealer. The dead man's mother appealed for calm. "I don't want nobody else's child to get hurt. I just want the kids to stay in their houses," Lucille Williams said outside her home. "I know my son is not an angel but I still think he should have had a chance just like everybody else."
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NEWS
February 20, 1995 | HELAINE OLEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was one sentence out of thousands spoken in a 35-year career on college campuses, but the firestorm it provoked at Rutgers University shows little sign of abating. Less than a day before the beginning of Black History Month, a local newspaper reported that university President Francis Lawrence had told an assembly of academics that African American students performed poorly on standardized tests because of their "genetic, hereditary background."
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NEWS
April 13, 1990 | From Associated Press
Street violence over the fatal shooting of a black teen-ager by a white policeman strained racial relations Thursday in this tightly knit suburb, which has prided itself on racial harmony for decades. Teen-agers, mostly blacks, roamed city streets after a night of smashing windows and overturning cars. The Wednesday night violence broke out after a peaceful candlelight protest over Tuesday's death of 15-year-old Phillip Pannell of River Edge.
NEWS
June 26, 1993 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The angry white man marched up and down the sidewalk in front of Sheik Omar Abdul Rahman's apartment, his fist clinched, his white T-shirt stained in sweat. "They ought to send the whole bunch of them back," he yelled. A short walk away, outside the storefront Al-Salam mosque here, a crowd of 50 Jersey City shoppers was massed in equal anger, demanding that the sheik and his followers abandon their Friday afternoon prayers and leave this old working-class community.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | DAVID TREADWELL, Times Staff Writer
A 24-year-old black man, wanted by authorities on armed assault and parole violation charges, was shot to death by a white policeman during an attempted arrest. The next afternoon, the police chief was quoted as calling the incident a "justifiable shooting" and adding that it's "business as usual." That night, hundreds of angry young blacks rampaged through downtown, smashing store windows with rocks and bottles, wrecking cars and besieging a city fire station.
NEWS
June 26, 1993 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The angry white man marched up and down the sidewalk in front of Sheik Omar Abdul Rahman's apartment, his fist clinched, his white T-shirt stained in sweat. "They ought to send the whole bunch of them back," he yelled. A short walk away, outside the storefront Al-Salam mosque here, a crowd of 50 Jersey City shoppers was massed in equal anger, demanding that the sheik and his followers abandon their Friday afternoon prayers and leave this old working-class community.
NEWS
April 16, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Hundreds of friends and family members jammed a church in Englewood, N.J., for the Easter Sunday wake of a black teen-ager whose slaying last week by a white policeman sparked a night of unrest in neighboring Teaneck. The mother of Phillip Pannell, 16, collapsed and had to be helped outside the Community Baptist Church. Attending the wake were Nation of Islam minister Louis Farrakhan, the Rev. Al Sharpton and civil rights lawyer Alton H. Maddox Jr.
NEWS
February 20, 1995 | HELAINE OLEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was one sentence out of thousands spoken in a 35-year career on college campuses, but the firestorm it provoked at Rutgers University shows little sign of abating. Less than a day before the beginning of Black History Month, a local newspaper reported that university President Francis Lawrence had told an assembly of academics that African American students performed poorly on standardized tests because of their "genetic, hereditary background."
NEWS
February 12, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Bergen County jury acquitted a white police officer of reckless manslaughter in the shooting death of a black youth that touched off a riot in the affluent New York City suburb of Teaneck, N.J. The officer, Gary Spath, 31, wept after the verdict was read. He shot Phillip Pannell, 16, in the back after a foot chase on April 10, 1990. Prosecutors said Pannell had his hands raised; the defense said the youth was reaching for a gun.
NEWS
May 7, 1992 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If this gritty city in northern New Jersey is any example, South Los Angeles faces a long, painful recovery from the devastation of last week's riots. Twenty-five years after the violent race riots that rocked Newark's predominantly black Central Ward, leaving 26 people dead and more than $10 million in property damage, the wounds left by the death and destruction are still visible in the community and among its residents. "We've earned a Ph.D in rioting," said Mayor Sharpe James.
NEWS
May 7, 1992 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If this gritty city in northern New Jersey is any example, South Los Angeles faces a long, painful recovery from the devastation of last week's riots. Twenty-five years after the violent race riots that rocked Newark's predominantly black Central Ward, leaving 26 people dead and more than $10 million in property damage, the wounds left by the death and destruction are still visible in the community and among its residents. "We've earned a Ph.D in rioting," said Mayor Sharpe James.
NEWS
February 12, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Bergen County jury acquitted a white police officer of reckless manslaughter in the shooting death of a black youth that touched off a riot in the affluent New York City suburb of Teaneck, N.J. The officer, Gary Spath, 31, wept after the verdict was read. He shot Phillip Pannell, 16, in the back after a foot chase on April 10, 1990. Prosecutors said Pannell had his hands raised; the defense said the youth was reaching for a gun.
NEWS
April 16, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Hundreds of friends and family members jammed a church in Englewood, N.J., for the Easter Sunday wake of a black teen-ager whose slaying last week by a white policeman sparked a night of unrest in neighboring Teaneck. The mother of Phillip Pannell, 16, collapsed and had to be helped outside the Community Baptist Church. Attending the wake were Nation of Islam minister Louis Farrakhan, the Rev. Al Sharpton and civil rights lawyer Alton H. Maddox Jr.
NEWS
April 13, 1990 | From Associated Press
Street violence over the fatal shooting of a black teen-ager by a white policeman strained racial relations Thursday in this tightly knit suburb, which has prided itself on racial harmony for decades. Teen-agers, mostly blacks, roamed city streets after a night of smashing windows and overturning cars. The Wednesday night violence broke out after a peaceful candlelight protest over Tuesday's death of 15-year-old Phillip Pannell of River Edge.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | DAVID TREADWELL, Times Staff Writer
A 24-year-old black man, wanted by authorities on armed assault and parole violation charges, was shot to death by a white policeman during an attempted arrest. The next afternoon, the police chief was quoted as calling the incident a "justifiable shooting" and adding that it's "business as usual." That night, hundreds of angry young blacks rampaged through downtown, smashing store windows with rocks and bottles, wrecking cars and besieging a city fire station.
NEWS
August 30, 1989 | From United Press International
Community leaders worked the streets Tuesday to defuse racial tensions that led to the arrest of 30 black and Latino youths in a rock-throwing protest over a white police officer's killing of a black suspected drug dealer. The dead man's mother appealed for calm. "I don't want nobody else's child to get hurt. I just want the kids to stay in their houses," Lucille Williams said outside her home. "I know my son is not an angel but I still think he should have had a chance just like everybody else."
NEWS
August 7, 1989 | BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writer
After 38 years watching the boardwalk from a worn Persian carpet in "Madame Edith's Temple of Knowledge," Edith Stevens says she doesn't need her crystal ball or Tarot cards to read this city's future. "There has to be changes here," she said, gold bracelets jangling on each arm. "This town can't get any worse." With the dramatic arrests last month of Mayor James L.
NEWS
August 7, 1989 | BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writer
After 38 years watching the boardwalk from a worn Persian carpet in "Madame Edith's Temple of Knowledge," Edith Stevens says she doesn't need her crystal ball or Tarot cards to read this city's future. "There has to be changes here," she said, gold bracelets jangling on each arm. "This town can't get any worse." With the dramatic arrests last month of Mayor James L.
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