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NEWS
March 27, 1988
A Lumbee Indian activist running for Superior Court judge in North Carolina's racially troubled Robeson County was found shot to death at his home. Julian T. Pierce, who had complained to a friend of death threats, was shot three times at point-blank range with a shotgun, Sheriff Hubert Stone said. "It just looks like he was actually assassinated," Stone said. Gov. James G.
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NEWS
November 6, 1999 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Among the first schoolchildren bused to integrate the Charlotte-Mecklenburg School District in 1970 was a 14-year-old black boy with thick glasses and no idea what awaited him in a white classroom on the other side of town.
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NEWS
February 2, 1988
Two heavily armed Tuscarora Indians who had taken over the office of the Robesonian newspaper in Lumberton, N.C., to protest the death of a black jail inmate released their last seven hostages after a 10-hour standoff. Seventeen people were in the office when Eddie Hatcher and Timothy Jacobs barged in with sawed-off shotguns and hand grenades, officials said. More than half of them were released within the first few hours of the crisis. Hatcher and Jacobs had said they wanted to speak with Gov.
NEWS
June 8, 1996 | From Associated Press
Fire investigators used dogs Friday to try to sniff out clues to an arson that destroyed a 93-year-old wooden sanctuary, the 30th fire at a Southern black church in the past year and half. Federal investigators on the scene stopped short of saying whether the fire Thursday night was related to the previous burnings. The building, which dated to 1903, was used only to store old pews and other things on the grounds of the Matthews-Murkland Presbyterian Church.
NEWS
November 1, 1990 | From The Washington Post
Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.), struggling to turn back the bid of Democrat Harvey Gantt to become the South's first post-Reconstruction black senator, Wednesday bluntly and directly injected the subject of race into the bitter Senate contest here in a television commercial attacking Gantt on the issue of racial job quotas.
NEWS
June 8, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
Carrying Confederate battle flags and chanting "KKK," about 150 white supremacists marched through downtown Greensboro on Sunday in the first Ku Klux Klan appearance here since a bloody shoot-out left five anti-klan activists dead in 1979. The klan parade, one of a series of recent recruitment marches by the Christian Knights of the Ku Klux Klan in North Carolina, was unmarked by any serious incident.
NEWS
August 11, 1990 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his battle to make history in North Carolina, Harvey Gantt draws upon events a continent away, rallying a group of supporters with the power of positive speaking. "You know, when you look at the people in Poland and in Czechoslovakia and you see what they threw off in the course of less than a year, I know that in North Carolina we can throw Jesse Helms off," he tells an enthusiastic crowd of about 200 in the nearby town of Bolivia.
NEWS
November 6, 1990 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the end of a bitter struggle that has become a barometer on the role of race in Southern politics, white incumbent GOP Sen. Jesse Helms and black challenger Harvey Gantt Monday pushed for big voter turnouts in the nation's most-watched Senate contest. Campaigning across the state and blitzing the airwaves with commercials, the two men wound up a race many consider too close to call.
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | From Associated Press
The dramatic lunch counter sit-in 30 years ago that helped ignite the 1960s civil rights movement surprised everyone, even the four black participants who re-enacted it Thursday at Woolworth. "We were scared," recalled Franklin McCain, one of the four college students who staged the first lunch counter sit-in on Feb. 1, 1960. "All I wanted was a Coke and a doughnut."
NEWS
June 8, 1996 | From Associated Press
Fire investigators used dogs Friday to try to sniff out clues to an arson that destroyed a 93-year-old wooden sanctuary, the 30th fire at a Southern black church in the past year and half. Federal investigators on the scene stopped short of saying whether the fire Thursday night was related to the previous burnings. The building, which dated to 1903, was used only to store old pews and other things on the grounds of the Matthews-Murkland Presbyterian Church.
NEWS
July 3, 1992 | Associated Press
Black leaders are angry over President Bush's decision to celebrate the Fourth of July in Faith, N.C., a town with no blacks and a history of poor race relations, including a Ku Klux Klan march last July. "Faith has an unspoken rule that no blacks are welcome there," said Christina Davis-McCoy, executive director of North Carolinians Against Racist and Religious Violence.
NEWS
November 6, 1990 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the end of a bitter struggle that has become a barometer on the role of race in Southern politics, white incumbent GOP Sen. Jesse Helms and black challenger Harvey Gantt Monday pushed for big voter turnouts in the nation's most-watched Senate contest. Campaigning across the state and blitzing the airwaves with commercials, the two men wound up a race many consider too close to call.
NEWS
November 1, 1990 | From The Washington Post
Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.), struggling to turn back the bid of Democrat Harvey Gantt to become the South's first post-Reconstruction black senator, Wednesday bluntly and directly injected the subject of race into the bitter Senate contest here in a television commercial attacking Gantt on the issue of racial job quotas.
NEWS
August 11, 1990 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his battle to make history in North Carolina, Harvey Gantt draws upon events a continent away, rallying a group of supporters with the power of positive speaking. "You know, when you look at the people in Poland and in Czechoslovakia and you see what they threw off in the course of less than a year, I know that in North Carolina we can throw Jesse Helms off," he tells an enthusiastic crowd of about 200 in the nearby town of Bolivia.
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | From Associated Press
The dramatic lunch counter sit-in 30 years ago that helped ignite the 1960s civil rights movement surprised everyone, even the four black participants who re-enacted it Thursday at Woolworth. "We were scared," recalled Franklin McCain, one of the four college students who staged the first lunch counter sit-in on Feb. 1, 1960. "All I wanted was a Coke and a doughnut."
NEWS
October 1, 1989
North Carolina has refused the Ku Klux Klan permission to join an Adopt-a-Highway cleanup program that would have allowed the group to post its name on signs along a stretch of road running through a black neighborhood. Under the program, the state puts up eye-catching, green-and-white road signs naming the group or business that has pledged to clean the adopted stretch of road four times a year. The klan asked for a 3.4-mile stretch of road on U.S.
NEWS
April 14, 1988 | KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writer
Among the Lumbee Indians here, Julian Pierce was described as "the best hope we had." Pierce's candidacy for a Superior Court judgeship marked what many believed would be a turning point for the Indians and blacks who form a two-thirds majority in Robeson County, N. C.
NEWS
March 31, 1988 | Associated Press
A special prosecutor was named Wednesday to investigate the killing of Julian Pierce, an American Indian activist who was running for a judgeship and was eulogized as Robeson County's "best hope for change." The state attorney general's office made the appointment at the request of county Dist. Atty. Joe Freeman Britt, Pierce's opponent for the Superior Court bench.
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