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NEWS
November 1, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Four white ninth-graders accused of planning a rampage at their predominantly black high school in Cleveland pleaded not guilty and were sent back to a juvenile lockup. The boys, one 14 and the others 15, were arraigned separately in closed hearings. They are alleged to have planned to set off bombs and open fire on classmates. An attorney representing one of them emerged from the arraignments upset that their names and photos have appeared in print and on television.
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NEWS
April 21, 2001 | Associated Press
Sixty-three people were indicted in the rioting over the fatal police shooting of an unarmed black man earlier this month, a prosecutor said Friday. Charges ranged from resisting arrest, a misdemeanor, to felonies including aggravated rioting and breaking and entering, Hamilton County prosecutor Michael Allen said. Three days of violent protests and rioting followed the April 7 shooting of Timothy Thomas, 19. Dozens of people were injured and more than 800 were arrested.
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NEWS
April 16, 2001 | From Associated Press
The mayor rolled back the city's dusk-to-dawn curfew Sunday in response to a calm night after the funeral of a young black man whose shooting triggered a week of unrest. Mayor Charlie Luken said the curfew would start at 11 p.m. instead of 8 p.m. to allow families time to celebrate Easter together. The April 7 death of Timothy Thomas, 19, led to three days of rioting in mostly black areas that stopped when the mayor instituted the curfew Thursday.
NEWS
April 17, 2001 | From Times wire reports
Promising to make police more accountable, the mayor lifted a citywide curfew that helped end days of rioting over the police shooting of an unarmed black man. "Now that the disturbances have subsided, they must never occur again," Mayor Charles Luken said. "We have an opportunity for a new Cincinnati." However, the mayor did not lift a state of emergency, which allows him to impose curfews and other restrictions.
NEWS
October 30, 1999 | From Associated Press
Four white students were arrested and seven others questioned in what was described as a racially motivated plot to carry out a Columbine-style massacre at their predominantly black high school Friday. Mayor Michael R. White closed South High for the day after the parents of a student tipped off authorities. White said that police seized two guns from one student's house and that the group planned to get weapons from a gang. No guns or explosives were found at the school.
NEWS
April 14, 2001 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rioting that blistered Cincinnati this week was a long time coming, local residents confess. Because from its earliest years, this has been a city divided--by race, by class, by fear. Along the Ohio River, the downtown sizzles: There's a new football stadium, a new baseball park is in the works, and a multimillion-dollar chic urban center of condos, restaurants and shops is planned.
NEWS
May 1, 1993 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is a weekday night at the Western Bowl & Cheyenne Social Club, where this west side neighborhood lets out its breath. Bowling balls thunder down 68 lanes, chubby glasses clink together, sporadic cheers and laughter erupt from men crowded around poker games behind ball-return machines. The feeling here, as in many such gatherings around these wooded hills, is one of a warm family reunion. The people glance at each other with tiny smiles that say there are certain things only they understand.
NEWS
April 12, 1994 | Associated Press
A suspended white policeman was convicted Monday of a misdemeanor for shooting a 6-year-old black child in the knee. Williams Beals Jr., 48, pleaded no contest to negligent assault, and the judge then found him guilty. Beals claimed that his gun discharged accidentally as he scolded two boys who were throwing rocks into his pool. The shooting July 17 stirred racial tensions, and two weeks later someone burned down Beals' home. Police have made no arrests.
NEWS
April 17, 2001 | From Times wire reports
Promising to make police more accountable, the mayor lifted a citywide curfew that helped end days of rioting over the police shooting of an unarmed black man. "Now that the disturbances have subsided, they must never occur again," Mayor Charles Luken said. "We have an opportunity for a new Cincinnati." However, the mayor did not lift a state of emergency, which allows him to impose curfews and other restrictions.
NEWS
April 15, 2001 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He has been so much a symbol that he's almost seemed anonymous: the young black man killed by a white police officer, the spark for three nights of rioting that tore this city apart. On Saturday, though, Timothy Thomas was eulogized. And hundreds upon hundreds saw his face. For nearly two hours, mourners filed past his open coffin, some pausing to make the sign of the cross, others reaching in to caress his face, in repose on a white satin pillow. His mother's sobs ripped the air.
NEWS
April 16, 2001 | From Associated Press
The mayor rolled back the city's dusk-to-dawn curfew Sunday in response to a calm night after the funeral of a young black man whose shooting triggered a week of unrest. Mayor Charlie Luken said the curfew would start at 11 p.m. instead of 8 p.m. to allow families time to celebrate Easter together. The April 7 death of Timothy Thomas, 19, led to three days of rioting in mostly black areas that stopped when the mayor instituted the curfew Thursday.
NEWS
April 15, 2001 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He has been so much a symbol that he's almost seemed anonymous: the young black man killed by a white police officer, the spark for three nights of rioting that tore this city apart. On Saturday, though, Timothy Thomas was eulogized. And hundreds upon hundreds saw his face. For nearly two hours, mourners filed past his open coffin, some pausing to make the sign of the cross, others reaching in to caress his face, in repose on a white satin pillow. His mother's sobs ripped the air.
NEWS
April 14, 2001 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rioting that blistered Cincinnati this week was a long time coming, local residents confess. Because from its earliest years, this has been a city divided--by race, by class, by fear. Along the Ohio River, the downtown sizzles: There's a new football stadium, a new baseball park is in the works, and a multimillion-dollar chic urban center of condos, restaurants and shops is planned.
NEWS
November 1, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Four white ninth-graders accused of planning a rampage at their predominantly black high school in Cleveland pleaded not guilty and were sent back to a juvenile lockup. The boys, one 14 and the others 15, were arraigned separately in closed hearings. They are alleged to have planned to set off bombs and open fire on classmates. An attorney representing one of them emerged from the arraignments upset that their names and photos have appeared in print and on television.
NEWS
October 30, 1999 | From Associated Press
Four white students were arrested and seven others questioned in what was described as a racially motivated plot to carry out a Columbine-style massacre at their predominantly black high school Friday. Mayor Michael R. White closed South High for the day after the parents of a student tipped off authorities. White said that police seized two guns from one student's house and that the group planned to get weapons from a gang. No guns or explosives were found at the school.
NEWS
April 12, 1994 | Associated Press
A suspended white policeman was convicted Monday of a misdemeanor for shooting a 6-year-old black child in the knee. Williams Beals Jr., 48, pleaded no contest to negligent assault, and the judge then found him guilty. Beals claimed that his gun discharged accidentally as he scolded two boys who were throwing rocks into his pool. The shooting July 17 stirred racial tensions, and two weeks later someone burned down Beals' home. Police have made no arrests.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
A white-supremacist network of up to 800 inmates also includes guards and controls prostitution, drugs and gambling at Ohio's maximum-security prison, a legislative committee alleges. Gov. Richard F. Celeste ordered an immediate and comprehensive investigation of gang activity at the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility at Lucasville after the House-Senate Correctional Institutional Inspection Committee linked the group to the stabbings of four black inmates.
NEWS
August 17, 1990 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sauntering out of the Ohio Bell Telephone Co. headquarters at lunchtime, a middle-aged man was greeted the other day by a familiar sight: 25 or so chanting demonstrators marching in a circle in front of the building. "This is becoming a Friday ritual," he said, stopping for a while to watch with a friend before moving on. The well-behaved demonstrators, who also have regularly targeted other downtown sites since their protest began June 29, are mostly Cleveland State University students.
NEWS
May 1, 1993 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is a weekday night at the Western Bowl & Cheyenne Social Club, where this west side neighborhood lets out its breath. Bowling balls thunder down 68 lanes, chubby glasses clink together, sporadic cheers and laughter erupt from men crowded around poker games behind ball-return machines. The feeling here, as in many such gatherings around these wooded hills, is one of a warm family reunion. The people glance at each other with tiny smiles that say there are certain things only they understand.
NEWS
December 23, 1990 | From Associated Press
About 1,500 people jeered and threw objects at six robed Ku Klux Klan members who staged a rally downtown Saturday, resulting in one injury and seven arrests. Hecklers at Fountain Square shouted obscenities, waved "Smash the Klan" signs and hurled bottles that shattered on the square's stage as helmeted police formed a barrier to hold back the crowd. "It's a damn shame the city's protecting them," one protester said.
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