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Racial Relations Orange County

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1995 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
School officials suspended nine more students from Aliso Niguel High School on Friday in connection with a racially charged incident that led to a brawl in the school lunchroom, authorities said. Meanwhile, the Orange County Sheriff's Department interviewed more than 25 students on campus Friday, investigating the incident as a possible hate crime involving gangs, according to Lt. Tom McCarthy.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1995 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ten students were suspended from Aliso Niguel High School on Thursday after a racially charged incident that culminated in a brawl involving at least 20 students, most from white supremacist and African American gangs, authorities said. School officials said late Thursday that they expect another 10 students to be suspended today and plan to recommend expulsions for at least three from the entire group, pending school board approval.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1995 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
E.J. Liao moved from Taiwan to Huntington Beach four years ago and thought the place was great--people were warm and welcoming and he saw no sign of ethnic tension. But that was before the high school junior was fluent in English. "Everyone was smiling at me, so I thought they were really nice," he said. "But as my English got better I began to really understand what people were saying and to realize there were problems."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1995 | BERT ELJERA
City leaders are co-sponsoring a "living room dialogue" Wednesday to promote better understanding among the city's various ethnic groups. The 7 p.m. meeting at the Community Meeting Center is intended to bring together Korean and white business owners and residents to discuss ways to promote cultural understanding. Korean Americans own about 1,300 businesses in the city, and some residents have complained that the Korean-language signs have given the city a "foreign" feel.
NEWS
December 31, 1994 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fierce election battle over Proposition 187 is done. And even though the measure's fate is now up to the courts, it has left racial bitterness and widespread confusion in Orange County. The upcoming year is likely to bring further protests and economic boycotts by Latinos who are angry and offended by the anti-illegal immigration measure. Some Latino leaders fear a rise in hate crimes and heightened suspicion of brown-skinned people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1994 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Workers at four charities that operate "adopt-a-family" programs in Orange County say some potential donors in the last few weeks have been specifying that their holiday gifts go to legal residents or non-Latinos only. "The problem this year has been there are very strong anti-immigrant feelings as a result of Prop. 187," said Shirley Bebereia, a teacher who runs the holiday food distribution program at Century High School in Santa Ana.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1994 | MIMI KO
Cities, agencies and organizations throughout the county are approving proclamations and making promises to remember the original Thanksgiving Day at the request of Los Amigos of Orange County. The community activist group passed out more than 100 pledge sheets urging organizations to remember the holiday so people will realize that everyone in the United States, with the exception of Native Americans, comes from immigrant backgrounds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1994 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Orange County becomes more ethnically diverse, many residents see conflicts along racial lines and fear that the local economy and quality of life will suffer without improved communications among different elements of the community, according to poll results released Wednesday.
NEWS
September 12, 1994 | SUSAN CHRISTIAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As Orange County's demographics have changed, so have its dating practices. Interracial dating has become a fact of life, according to a Times Orange County Poll of 500 unmarried people conducted in late June. Nearly 60% of respondents 18 to 34 years old say they have dated someone from another racial or ethnic group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1994 | TAMMY HYUNJOO KRESTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Each Monday night this summer, a tiny classroom has been packed with Korean American doctors, merchants and other professionals eagerly scribbling down their teacher's every word. * In Korean, the instructor asks his students to repeat after him. "Cuanto cuesta," he says. The 70 pupils chant in unison.
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