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Racial Relations Orange County

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1993 | RENE LYNCH and DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sheriff's Deputy Darryn Leroy Robins, who died at the hand of a fellow officer, cannot "rest in peace" until questions about the bizarre Christmas Day shooting are answered, the president of the Orange County chapter of the Urban League declared Thursday.
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NEWS
December 29, 1993 | THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You see it in the faces of people on the streets, hear about it at government meeting halls and read about it in newspapers. Orange County is changing rapidly in its ethnic makeup. One in four residents is Latino and about 10% are of Asian descent. The change has resulted in some cultural misunderstandings, and several incidents lately caused some concern over the state of ethnic relations.
NEWS
December 29, 1993 | THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dolly Shimizu Kaplan was teaching Sunday school at the University United Methodist Church about a decade ago when she noticed that the textbooks her class was using were "racially biased." "The books were telling stories about how children should play fairly, and they had pictures of only black children behaving inappropriately," said Kaplan, 54. "I told the minister about it, and our church changed the school material to different ones."
NEWS
December 29, 1993 | DOREEN CARVAJAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deep in a side pocket of a shopping mall, near the remains of Santa's village, is a storefront focusing on multiculture instead of mega-sales. The clerks here don't indulge in "have a nice day" pleasantries. And among the more popular displays are a portrait of an elegantly dressed mariachi and a backlighted signboard emblazoned with season's greetings: "Remember some white people are very nice people too."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1993 | RICHARD CORE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At the grand opening for Aliso Viejo Middle School in October, parents and teachers rolled out a red carpet, cheered and applauded as students stepped off arriving buses like the proverbial conquering heroes. This would be the school of the future. Resting in a peaceful South County canyon along meandering Aliso Creek, the new school, with its cutting-edge technology, felt far removed from the problems confronting its urban counterparts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1993 | SUSAN BYRNES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After an ugly confrontation at a monthly noontime dance, many at John F. Kennedy High School feared that clashes over music had become part of a growing problem of racial divisiveness. On Tuesday, music became part of the solution. About 300 students danced and waved their hands in a crowded auditorium where an assembly designed to ease racial tension turned into a showcase of black and Latino rappers and comedians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1993 | FRANK MESSINA
Upset by a series of racial incidents, Saddleback College officials have organized discussions and seminars to combat the problem on campus. A forum open to students and the community will be held Tuesday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the McKinney Theatre at Saddleback College, 28000 Marguerite Parkway. Officials also have scheduled three hours of discussions about racial tolerance.
NEWS
October 27, 1993 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ponytailed little girl with dark brown eyes was quietly fascinated with the paper clip she had twisted beyond recognition. A few desks away, another student rested her chin on her hands, her eyes slightly glazed. In the back of the classroom, a 10-year-old boy fidgeted restlessly in his chair while noisily folding and unfolding several sheets of paper.
NEWS
October 26, 1993 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barbara Carothers waxed nostalgic about the days three decades back when she and her husband first moved to what she called the "little country town" of Orange. It was a quiet, safe place, she said, where neighbors were not strangers, and the sweet scent from nearby orange groves filled the air. A lot has changed since then. The town has grown into a city, and Carothers has seen many of her fellow Anglos move away, often to be replaced by Latinos.
NEWS
October 25, 1993 | ALICIA DI RADO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whatever the differences among Orange County's ethnic groups, frustration over crime and fear of its effect on the county's neighborhoods is a uniting force. More than half the residents of Orange County--with scant differences by ethnicity or political leanings--mention crime or gangs or both when asked to name the most important problem facing their community.
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