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Racial Relations Riverside County

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2000 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost two years after four white Riverside police officers shot and killed a black woman passed out in a car, the city has finalized a $3-million legal settlement with the woman's survivors, family representatives and attorneys involved in the case said Wednesday. Tyisha Miller's family will receive $500,000 immediately and is planning to accept the rest in installments over the next 15 years, said the Rev. Bernell Butler, Miller's cousin and a family spokesman.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2000 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost two years after four white Riverside police officers shot and killed a black woman passed out in a car, the city has finalized a $3-million legal settlement with the woman's survivors, family representatives and attorneys involved in the case said Wednesday. Tyisha Miller's family will receive $500,000 immediately and is planning to accept the rest in installments over the next 15 years, said the Rev. Bernell Butler, Miller's cousin and a family spokesman.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1999 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a rousing service Sunday, the Rev. DeWayne Butler implored his congregation to march for justice today, saying the district attorney's findings in the killing of Tyisha Miller underscore that "police cannot police police." "It's time to say enough is enough," said Butler, whose cousin, the 19-year-old Miller, was shot a dozen times after police were called because she was apparently asleep with the gun in a locked car Dec. 28. Riverside County Dist. Atty.
NEWS
July 27, 2000 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorneys representing survivors of Tyisha Miller, a black woman killed by white police officers in Riverside, have reached a tentative multimillion-dollar settlement with the city, according to lawyers and court documents filed Wednesday. The documents say an agreement has been reached but do not specify how much the city would pay. But a source close to the case, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the city has agreed to pay $3 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1999 | TOM GORMAN and JULIE HA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
National civil rights activists joined about 1,000 people Monday in a mostly peaceful rally protesting the decision by county prosecutors not to file criminal charges against four police officers who shot and killed Tyisha Miller in December. Riverside police said 46 people, including activists Dick Gregory, the Rev. Al Sharpton and Martin Luther King III, were arrested in a carefully orchestrated demonstration that blocked the entrance to police headquarters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1999
Critics of the Riverside police shooting of Tyisha Miller conducted another of their weekly protest marches Monday, attracting about 75 demonstrators but this time not prompting any arrests for civil disobedience. One speaker, NAACP Western Regional Director Frank Berry, admonished the group to demonstrate its anger by registering to vote. He contended that Riverside County Dist. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1999 | JOSEPH TREVINO and JOSH MEYER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Protesters still angry over the fatal shooting of a Riverside teenager escalated their calls for justice Tuesday to include the case of a mentally ill homeless woman who was shot to death by a Los Angeles police officer last week during a dispute over her shopping cart. More than 350 demonstrators carried signs and chanted "No justice, no peace, no racist police!" in front of the U.S. attorney's office in downtown Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1999 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nineteen-year-old Tyisha Miller was laid to rest at sunset Saturday on a wind-swept cemetery knoll after a stirring, three-hour church service that was part funeral and part civil protest, imploring God to dispense justice for her death from police bullets. Calling her killing more brutal than the slaughter of a farm animal, one of her cousins, the Rev. Dewayne Butler, shouted passionately to about 800 mourners, "Oh, yes, I'm outraged! I'm upset! I'm angry!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2000 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The black woman was passed out in a Nissan Sentra, radio blasting, doors locked, a pistol on her lap. When four white police officers tried to wake her, they saw a sudden movement. "It scared the hell out of me," one officer recalled later. They fired 24 times at Tyisha Miller. Twelve bullets found their mark.
NEWS
April 4, 1996 | ROBERT J. LOPEZ and RICH CONNELL and MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Nose-to-nose with a car hood, or a dirt lot, or a snarling face--it's not a view that inspires respect for law enforcement. Maybe that's why 18-year-old Armando Marcello doesn't trust the Riverside County sheriff's deputies sworn to protect him. Like many Latinos, he tells of uneasy encounters with deputies. And he could do so long before two of them were videotaped beating two suspected illegal immigrants. But these days, "I told you so" is said with more sorrow than swagger.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2000 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The black woman was passed out in a Nissan Sentra, radio blasting, doors locked, a pistol on her lap. When four white police officers tried to wake her, they saw a sudden movement. "It scared the hell out of me," one officer recalled later. They fired 24 times at Tyisha Miller. Twelve bullets found their mark.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1999
Critics of the Riverside police shooting of Tyisha Miller conducted another of their weekly protest marches Monday, attracting about 75 demonstrators but this time not prompting any arrests for civil disobedience. One speaker, NAACP Western Regional Director Frank Berry, admonished the group to demonstrate its anger by registering to vote. He contended that Riverside County Dist. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1999 | JOSEPH TREVINO and JOSH MEYER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Protesters still angry over the fatal shooting of a Riverside teenager escalated their calls for justice Tuesday to include the case of a mentally ill homeless woman who was shot to death by a Los Angeles police officer last week during a dispute over her shopping cart. More than 350 demonstrators carried signs and chanted "No justice, no peace, no racist police!" in front of the U.S. attorney's office in downtown Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1999 | TOM GORMAN and JULIE HA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
National civil rights activists joined about 1,000 people Monday in a mostly peaceful rally protesting the decision by county prosecutors not to file criminal charges against four police officers who shot and killed Tyisha Miller in December. Riverside police said 46 people, including activists Dick Gregory, the Rev. Al Sharpton and Martin Luther King III, were arrested in a carefully orchestrated demonstration that blocked the entrance to police headquarters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1999 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a rousing service Sunday, the Rev. DeWayne Butler implored his congregation to march for justice today, saying the district attorney's findings in the killing of Tyisha Miller underscore that "police cannot police police." "It's time to say enough is enough," said Butler, whose cousin, the 19-year-old Miller, was shot a dozen times after police were called because she was apparently asleep with the gun in a locked car Dec. 28. Riverside County Dist. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1999 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nineteen-year-old Tyisha Miller was laid to rest at sunset Saturday on a wind-swept cemetery knoll after a stirring, three-hour church service that was part funeral and part civil protest, imploring God to dispense justice for her death from police bullets. Calling her killing more brutal than the slaughter of a farm animal, one of her cousins, the Rev. Dewayne Butler, shouted passionately to about 800 mourners, "Oh, yes, I'm outraged! I'm upset! I'm angry!
NEWS
July 27, 2000 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorneys representing survivors of Tyisha Miller, a black woman killed by white police officers in Riverside, have reached a tentative multimillion-dollar settlement with the city, according to lawyers and court documents filed Wednesday. The documents say an agreement has been reached but do not specify how much the city would pay. But a source close to the case, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the city has agreed to pay $3 million.
NEWS
April 4, 1996 | ROBERT J. LOPEZ and RICH CONNELL and MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Nose-to-nose with a car hood, or a dirt lot, or a snarling face--it's not a view that inspires respect for law enforcement. Maybe that's why 18-year-old Armando Marcello doesn't trust the Riverside County sheriff's deputies sworn to protect him. Like many Latinos, he tells of uneasy encounters with deputies. And he could do so long before two of them were videotaped beating two suspected illegal immigrants. But these days, "I told you so" is said with more sorrow than swagger.
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