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Racial Relations South Africa

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1990 | JEFF SILVERMAN
Athol Fugard's choice of the La Jolla Playhouse for the first West Coast presentation of his latest play, "My Children! My Africa!," may come as something of a surprise to the theater community. Given both his and the Market Theatre's many previous associations with Los Angeles' Mark Taper Forum and its artistic director, Gordon Davidson, La Jolla's announcement last week that it had wooed the play to its stage in July is a testament to tenacity and the powers of direct contact.
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NEWS
December 4, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Facing questions about dozens of alleged civilian deaths, Pentagon officials said Monday that they would investigate the bombing in eastern Afghanistan of a complex of caves and tunnels where terrorist leaders are believed to be hiding. Afghan villagers and local officials have alleged that U.S. forces flattened hamlets near Jalalabad while systematically bombing the suspected hide-outs of leaders of the Al Qaeda terrorism network. Pentagon officials insisted that they had no evidence to support the allegations, and they suggested that the accusers may be secret supporters of Al Qaeda or that the deaths may have been caused by Taliban forces.
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NEWS
July 10, 1991 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty-one years after it was expelled from Olympic competition for its racially discriminatory policy of apartheid, South Africa won readmission from the International Olympic Committee here Tuesday, opening the door for South African athletes to participate in the 1992 Olympic Games. The historic decision, based largely on the South African Parliament's repeal of key apartheid statutes in June, is expected to give a big boost to the reform movement of South African President Frederik W.
NEWS
May 13, 2001 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A black teenager in northern South Africa is beaten to death by nine white men while trespassing on private land. A white drama professor is shot and wounded by a black student demanding the staging of African rather than European productions. White farmers vow to defend themselves in the wake of a spate of slayings allegedly committed by blacks.
NEWS
July 28, 1991 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South African anti-apartheid leader Nelson Mandela ended a three-day visit here Saturday after an unhesitant embrace of Cuban President Fidel Castro's Communist revolution, which he called "a source of inspiration to all freedom-loving people." "We admire the sacrifices of the Cuban people in maintaining their independence and sovereignty in the face of a vicious, imperialist-orchestrated campaign," Mandela told a rally at which he was Castro's honored guest.
NEWS
June 22, 1990 | DON SHANNON and SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Nelson Mandela stoutly defended his ties with Palestine Liberation Organization Chairman Yasser Arafat on Thursday, chiding those who he said had tried to misconstrue his position on Israel and saying that "we have no time to look into the internal affairs of other countries." Mandela was questioned on the matter extensively during a "town meeting" segment of ABC-TV's "Nightline" aired Thursday night.
NEWS
July 1, 1990 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first it seemed quixotic. But today, billions of dollars in California pension funds have been pulled out of South Africa. And as Nelson Mandela concluded his U.S. tour, people who set out to force California to pull its money out of South Africa were basking in the belief that they played a part in freeing the anti-apartheid leader. "It's an affirmation of our work," Pedro Noguera said of Mandela's visit.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Frederik W. de Klerk announced Saturday that 71-year-old Nelson R. Mandela, who personifies nearly a century of black struggle to end white minority rule, will walk free today after more than 27 years in prison, putting South Africa on a dramatic new course toward ending one of the bloodiest racial conflicts in history. "This will bring us to the end of a long chapter," De Klerk told a news conference.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The orange and white South African Airways jetliner, door open and engines idling at Jan Smuts International Airport, was chockablock full, except for one front-row seat, when the loudspeaker crackled to life. The captain announced a half-hour delay in departing for Cape Town. Passengers grimaced and looked at their watches. Thirty minutes passed and the captain was back at the mike, announcing another half-hour delay. By now, most of the 260 passengers were in a thoroughly bad mood.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1992 | ELAINE DUTKA, Elaine Dutka is a Times staff writer
The world has changed radically in the five years since the South African musical "Sarafina!" first hit the Broadway stage. The Soviet Union has collapsed. The Berlin Wall is gone. And, in the wake of the release of jailed African National Congress leader Nelson Mandela, the Parliament of South Africa abolished the laws mandating separation of the races. As history has evolved, so did the film version of "Sarafina!"
NEWS
March 21, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
South Africa withdrew the first post-apartheid order to force the sale of a white farmer's land for black resettlement, saying it wanted to give negotiations over the property's value another chance. Transvaal Agriculture Union spokesman Theo Wassenaar said the Agriculture and Land Affairs Ministry had withdrawn the order to expropriate Willem Pretorius' land after the farmer applied to have the order annulled.
NEWS
December 17, 2000 | From Reuters
Reconciliation Day on Saturday showed deep divisions among this nation's white population: rising racial tension galvanized some to publish a declaration of collective guilt while others paid homage to apartheid. A group of prominent white South Africans formally declared collective guilt for apartheid and launched a fund at Cape Town's St. George's Cathedral to help poor blacks and to try to narrow a widening racial gap just six years after the country's first all-race election.
SPORTS
July 3, 2000 | DOUG CRESS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
We carried blacks, all South African blacks, on our shoulders that night. You can't imagine how heavy that was. --Patrick Ntsoelengoe, Black XI soccer player * Back then, Jomo Sono was not allowed into the posh Johannesburg suburb of Turffontein. Certainly not to play soccer, and certainly not after dark. After all, South Africa's policy of apartheid was about keeping the races as separate and unequal as possible, even for the best black athletes of a generation.
NEWS
September 11, 1999 | From Associated Press
It's unusual to make a sitting president testify in court. Rarer still to force testimony from one with the stature of Nelson Mandela. And downright unheard of for the judge to accuse that president of insolence. But Mandela's courtroom ordeal paid off Friday when the nation's highest court ruled in his favor in the lengthy legal battle over racism in white South Africa's national pastime: rugby.
NEWS
June 4, 1999 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The pharmacy manager who interrupted Shamiela Isaacs' job interview for a cashier's position didn't mince words. The post was open only to black people, he advised, so the interviewer might as well quit wasting Isaacs' time. The discussion came to a halt and Isaacs, 20, a woman of mixed race and an experienced cashier, was bluntly informed by the white interviewer that she would not get the job. She was not suitable.
NEWS
May 26, 1999 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Albert Gamakulu has moved up in the world. Since his uncle, Nelson Mandela, was elected this country's first black president five years ago, Gamakulu and his family have taken up residence in a one-room house with windows of flattened cardboard boxes and torn flour sacks. Going to the toilet still means a trip through the cornfield to his parents' outhouse. Running water is the tip-of-the-bucket variety collected from a roadside tap.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1990 | RICK GLADSTONE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A record 300 shareholder resolutions on social concerns ranging from South African divestment to teen-age smoking were filed this year for votes at annual meetings, 40% more than last year. But the fastest growth came in resolutions urging more corporate sensitivity to the environment.
NEWS
September 18, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Andrew Manson, a white South African, and his mixed-race Danish wife moved here a decade ago, they found an oasis of racial tolerance and tranquillity. While apartheid gripped South Africa a few miles away, this tiny nation--created by apartheid's social engineers--had a black ruler, multiracial schools, mixed neighborhoods and equal opportunities for all races. But, oh, how the tables have turned.
NEWS
October 30, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a public damnation of the evils perpetrated under apartheid, South Africa's truth commission Thursday released its final report after the ruling African National Congress lost an eleventh-hour court battle to keep it under wraps. The milestone document lays blame for killings, beatings and torture on the former, white-minority regime, which it identifies as the No. 1 villain of the country's racist past.
NEWS
July 31, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a frantic race against the clock, South Africa's truth commission will square off today for the last time against one of the most sinister figures of the apartheid era, who is believed to know many of the former white regime's darkest secrets. Dr.
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