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Racial Relations South Africa

NEWS
April 5, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From morning until night Monday, scores of callers to the popular talk shows on AM "Radio 702" were in agreement: Armageddon is coming in three weeks. "I think there's going to be bombings," warned Penny. "People who are stockpiling petrol and food are very wise," opined Phyllis. "I'm getting my family out," promised Keith.
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NEWS
March 15, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The land of Bop is no more. The so-called Republic of Bophuthatswana, a fictional country that was granted independence by South Africa's apartheid-era rulers in 1977 and recognized by no one else, has been effectively reclaimed by Pretoria after last week's violent mass protests and an abortive invasion by a ragtag army of white vigilantes.
NEWS
March 13, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of heavily armed South African army commandos patrolled this riot-torn homeland capital on foot and in huge armored vehicles Saturday, welcomed for the first time as liberators against a repressive regime that had tried to keep blacks from voting in next month's democratic elections. Sent to restore order after a popular uprising here, the army's role is likely to grow following an unprecedented decision in Pretoria to oust Bophuthatswana's despotic leader, Lucas Mangope.
NEWS
March 6, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the latest dip of this country's political roller coaster, militant leaders of the far right Saturday overwhelmingly rejected a last-ditch plan to participate in next month's elections and warned again of civil war if they are not granted an independent white homeland. As a result, retired Gen.
NEWS
February 28, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their living room furniture was still parked in the driveway, but Chris and Ina Smit stopped unpacking one sunny day last week to cheerfully explain just why they had decided to become the newest residents of one of this country's strangest towns. God had appeared to him in a vision, Smit said. "I only saw his backside. He spoke to me in a telepathic way. . . . And he told us to come here."
NEWS
February 8, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under pressure to stem a mounting terror campaign, police arrested five white members of far-right militant groups Monday in connection with a wave of at least 32 bombings in the last two months. The most recent attack, late Sunday night, destroyed a day-care center for black children in Warmbad, a right-wing stronghold north of Pretoria. A powerful bomb blew the roof off, destroyed windows and furniture and damaged surrounding buildings and homes, police said.
NEWS
February 6, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The late-night bomb exploded without warning, shattering windows in five shops and offices and scattering shrapnel that cratered concrete, pierced metal frames and splintered wood furniture. Amid the broken glass and debris, the target was obvious: The bomb--one of at least 30 tallied by police since late December--had been placed on the doormat of the recently opened office of the African National Congress.
NEWS
February 1, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nelson Mandela went on the political offensive here in the heart of right-wing country Monday, administering a kind of shock therapy to a roomful of stunned white Afrikaners. For nearly two hours, Mandela alternately mocked and scolded about 350 mostly white business and academic leaders invited by the town's business forum to a question-and-answer session with the man expected to become South Africa's first black president after democratic elections in April.
NEWS
January 31, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As security chief of this nation's first renegade radio station, Pieter le Roux is clearly proud of his handiwork. Atop a treeless hill, past the roadblocks and armed guards, is a newly dug moat. Razor wire bristles on a fence, and gun ports dot a concrete wall beside the gate. Inside are two lines of trenches topped with sandbags. Then chest-high barricades of sandbags, and a wall of tires filled with dirt, protect the broadcast tower and tiny studio. But the rebel redoubt isn't quite complete.
NEWS
January 17, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Pan-Africanist Congress, a militant black party suspected by police of carrying out several high-profile terrorist attacks on whites in the last year, announced that it is suspending its armed struggle. The decision clears the way for the party to take part in South Africa's first universal suffrage election on April 27, and for its armed wing, the Azanian People's Liberation Army, to join a 10,000-member, multi-party national peacekeeping force scheduled to begin training later this month.
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