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Racial Relations South Africa

NEWS
April 19, 1994 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Manu, 54, owner of a small print shop Minnie, 44, partner in the shop Leila and Pravina, both 19, students Sarita, 6, student * Home: Suburban Cape Town * Politics: Favor the African National Congress * Background: Manu's parents came to Durban from India in 1935. Minnie was classified by apartheid as "Cape Colored," the product of centuries of intermarriage between Europeans and indigenous peoples. * Manu Desai: "Under apartheid, there were no two kinds of black.
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NEWS
April 19, 1994 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nothing sums up apartheid more precisely, nor more painfully, than a black mother crying for her child killed in the dusty streets of a South African township in a protest against a system that was denying him a future.
NEWS
April 18, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Black, yellow and green balloons filled the crisp blue sky. Uncaged pigeons took flight over a sea of waving flags and fists. About 20,000 people cheered and chanted in wild adulation, surging forward with such force that three people were trampled to death and 21 were injured.
NEWS
April 17, 1994 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The death toll from pre-election violence in South Africa had reached into the hundreds early this month, and an accord between Zulu nationalists and the African National Congress seemed more elusive than ever. From his vantage point in Phoenix, where he lives in retirement, the Rev. Leon H. Sullivan was viewing the turmoil with dismay. "I keep remembering that our main objective was to end the apartheid system and get South African blacks the opportunity to vote," he said one day recently.
NEWS
April 5, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From morning until night Monday, scores of callers to the popular talk shows on AM "Radio 702" were in agreement: Armageddon is coming in three weeks. "I think there's going to be bombings," warned Penny. "People who are stockpiling petrol and food are very wise," opined Phyllis. "I'm getting my family out," promised Keith.
NEWS
March 15, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The land of Bop is no more. The so-called Republic of Bophuthatswana, a fictional country that was granted independence by South Africa's apartheid-era rulers in 1977 and recognized by no one else, has been effectively reclaimed by Pretoria after last week's violent mass protests and an abortive invasion by a ragtag army of white vigilantes.
NEWS
March 13, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of heavily armed South African army commandos patrolled this riot-torn homeland capital on foot and in huge armored vehicles Saturday, welcomed for the first time as liberators against a repressive regime that had tried to keep blacks from voting in next month's democratic elections. Sent to restore order after a popular uprising here, the army's role is likely to grow following an unprecedented decision in Pretoria to oust Bophuthatswana's despotic leader, Lucas Mangope.
NEWS
March 6, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the latest dip of this country's political roller coaster, militant leaders of the far right Saturday overwhelmingly rejected a last-ditch plan to participate in next month's elections and warned again of civil war if they are not granted an independent white homeland. As a result, retired Gen.
NEWS
February 28, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their living room furniture was still parked in the driveway, but Chris and Ina Smit stopped unpacking one sunny day last week to cheerfully explain just why they had decided to become the newest residents of one of this country's strangest towns. God had appeared to him in a vision, Smit said. "I only saw his backside. He spoke to me in a telepathic way. . . . And he told us to come here."
NEWS
February 8, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under pressure to stem a mounting terror campaign, police arrested five white members of far-right militant groups Monday in connection with a wave of at least 32 bombings in the last two months. The most recent attack, late Sunday night, destroyed a day-care center for black children in Warmbad, a right-wing stronghold north of Pretoria. A powerful bomb blew the roof off, destroyed windows and furniture and damaged surrounding buildings and homes, police said.
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