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Racial Relations South Carolina

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NEWS
July 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
After decades of debate and mounting pressure from an NAACP boycott, South Carolina finally removed the Confederate flag from atop its Statehouse on Saturday in a somber ceremony that paid tribute to its Civil War roots. The flag, seen as a reminder of slavery for some and a tribute to Southern heritage for others, flew atop the Statehouse dome for 38 years.
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NEWS
July 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
After decades of debate and mounting pressure from an NAACP boycott, South Carolina finally removed the Confederate flag from atop its Statehouse on Saturday in a somber ceremony that paid tribute to its Civil War roots. The flag, seen as a reminder of slavery for some and a tribute to Southern heritage for others, flew atop the Statehouse dome for 38 years.
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NEWS
May 17, 2000 | From Reuters
The NAACP, fighting a compromise to move the Confederate battle flag from atop South Carolina's Statehouse to a nearby monument, threatened on Tuesday to step up an economic boycott of the state if its Senate did not reject the plan.
NEWS
May 17, 2000 | From Reuters
The NAACP, fighting a compromise to move the Confederate battle flag from atop South Carolina's Statehouse to a nearby monument, threatened on Tuesday to step up an economic boycott of the state if its Senate did not reject the plan.
NEWS
February 19, 1987
The Citadel in Charleston, S.C., where a black cadet was hazed by whites last fall, has achieved much in race relations but insensitivity remains a problem, according to results of an internal investigation. The report concluded that almost all black cadets object to the playing of "Dixie" and the waving of the Confederate flag at football games, while white cadets are split on the issue.
NEWS
July 30, 1997 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the Rev. David Kennedy hesitated, if he felt a twinge of doubt when the tattooed homeless man asked for his help, a single glance at the children baking in the back of the pickup truck in the midday sun was enough to make up his mind. Whippet-thin, with Confederate flags stenciled on his arms, the stranger looked like a rough character--the kind of white man who ordinarily would have little to do with an activist black preacher.
NEWS
November 28, 1996 | From Associated Press
Gov. David Beasley persuaded most of South Carolina's leading politicians Wednesday to join his effort to move the Confederate battle flag off the Statehouse dome. Beasley, a Republican, gathered the bipartisan support in hopes of resolving a bitter feud over the flag, which many blacks say symbolizes slavery and racism. The compromise would move it to a Confederate monument on the Statehouse grounds. U.S. Sen.
NEWS
March 8, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Students in Greenville, S.C., who want to take advantage of Bob Jones University's decision to drop its ban on interracial dating will need a note from their parents. Bob Jones III, the school's president, announced an end to the ban last week. On Monday, he told nearly 4,000 students at a daily chapel service on the campus that they must tell their parents if they become involved in an interracial relationship. "We will carry out the will of your parents," he said.
NEWS
March 5, 2000 | From Associated Press
Bob Jones University's decision to lift its half-century-old ban on interracial dating has stunned students and the fundamentalist Christian school's supporters who learned about it Friday night in a nationally televised interview with President Bob Jones III. "I don't think even his own secretary knew what he was going to do," school spokesman Jonathan Pait said. Thousands of students and supporters gathered at the university's auditorium to watch Jones' interview on CNN's "Larry King Live."
NEWS
November 27, 1996 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Troubled by church burnings, drive-by shootings and other signs of growing racial divisiveness, Gov. David Beasley called Tuesday night for hauling down the Confederate battle flag from atop the state Capitol, the last statehouse from which it still flies. But the gesture, which he has planned for days and had hoped would help unite the races, turned instead into an extraordinary and contentious debate--not just about the flag but about the meaning and morality of Southern history.
NEWS
March 8, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Students in Greenville, S.C., who want to take advantage of Bob Jones University's decision to drop its ban on interracial dating will need a note from their parents. Bob Jones III, the school's president, announced an end to the ban last week. On Monday, he told nearly 4,000 students at a daily chapel service on the campus that they must tell their parents if they become involved in an interracial relationship. "We will carry out the will of your parents," he said.
NEWS
March 5, 2000 | From Associated Press
Bob Jones University's decision to lift its half-century-old ban on interracial dating has stunned students and the fundamentalist Christian school's supporters who learned about it Friday night in a nationally televised interview with President Bob Jones III. "I don't think even his own secretary knew what he was going to do," school spokesman Jonathan Pait said. Thousands of students and supporters gathered at the university's auditorium to watch Jones' interview on CNN's "Larry King Live."
NEWS
October 17, 1999 | From Associated Press
The NAACP's national board on Saturday unanimously approved a tourism boycott of South Carolina until the state stops flying the Confederate flag from its Capitol. The National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People also asked the U.S. Justice Department to investigate whether official display of the symbol infringed on the civil rights of blacks.
NEWS
July 11, 1998 | RICHARD E. MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ammie Murray noticed the car out of the corner of her eye. There was something odd about it. The car was an aging maroon Pontiac. It was parked on a narrow side road that led off into a swamp along the Congaree River. People used those rutty old roads to go fishing. The odd thing was that the car was full, at a dead stop and facing out. That made her uneasy, but she drove on, at 30 mph or so, over the sand and the washouts that covered Old State Road.
NEWS
July 30, 1997 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the Rev. David Kennedy hesitated, if he felt a twinge of doubt when the tattooed homeless man asked for his help, a single glance at the children baking in the back of the pickup truck in the midday sun was enough to make up his mind. Whippet-thin, with Confederate flags stenciled on his arms, the stranger looked like a rough character--the kind of white man who ordinarily would have little to do with an activist black preacher.
NEWS
November 28, 1996 | From Associated Press
Gov. David Beasley persuaded most of South Carolina's leading politicians Wednesday to join his effort to move the Confederate battle flag off the Statehouse dome. Beasley, a Republican, gathered the bipartisan support in hopes of resolving a bitter feud over the flag, which many blacks say symbolizes slavery and racism. The compromise would move it to a Confederate monument on the Statehouse grounds. U.S. Sen.
NEWS
January 11, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The father of a woman raped and murdered--possibly because she was white--has called for racial calm after the arrests of seven black suspects in Charleston, S.C. "Revenge is no way to solve a problem," Clair McLauchlin said. "We don't want anything else horrible to happen." Missy McLauchlin, 25, was crossing the street to a grocery store when she was picked up by several men.
NEWS
November 27, 1996 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Troubled by church burnings, drive-by shootings and other signs of growing racial divisiveness, Gov. David Beasley called Tuesday night for hauling down the Confederate battle flag from atop the state Capitol, the last statehouse from which it still flies. But the gesture, which he has planned for days and had hoped would help unite the races, turned instead into an extraordinary and contentious debate--not just about the flag but about the meaning and morality of Southern history.
NEWS
January 11, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The father of a woman raped and murdered--possibly because she was white--has called for racial calm after the arrests of seven black suspects in Charleston, S.C. "Revenge is no way to solve a problem," Clair McLauchlin said. "We don't want anything else horrible to happen." Missy McLauchlin, 25, was crossing the street to a grocery store when she was picked up by several men.
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