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NEWS
June 18, 1992 | MAIA DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In one of the more unusual community service projects spawned by the Los Angeles riots, a Simi Valley woman is organizing a softball game that will pit Simi Valley police officers against residents of South Los Angeles. Susan Davenport, 43, said she hopes the game, set for Aug. 1 in a Simi Valley park, will draw 1,000 spectators and help improve relations between the communities. "There's a lot of misconceptions about people from Simi Valley and about people from South-Central," Davenport said.
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NEWS
July 18, 1993 | SANDRA HERNANDEZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Debbie Siler of Compton doesn't fear getting lost in Simi Valley anymore. "Last week I was driving toward Simi Valley with a friend and I told her, 'Don't worry. If we get lost, I know a police officer out here,' " Siler said. Siler met the police officer, Detective Gene Hostetler, last year at a softball game between South Los Angeles area and Simi Valley residents as a way to unite the two communities. The game was congenial and successful, and a second will be played Saturday at 12:30 p.m.
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NEWS
June 14, 1992 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
White supremacist Richard Barrett, whose recent Simi Valley parade was aborted by police after a violent counterdemonstration erupted, says he wants to return for a second try, this time under the protection of the National Guard. "We will be in touch with the city and the county and governor's office," Barrett said by telephone from his Mississippi office last week.
NEWS
June 18, 1992 | MAIA DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In one of the more unusual community service projects spawned by the Los Angeles riots, a Simi Valley woman is organizing a softball game that will pit Simi Valley police officers against residents of South Los Angeles. Susan Davenport, 43, said she hopes the game, set for Aug. 1 in a Simi Valley park, will draw 1,000 spectators and help improve relations between the communities. "There's a lot of misconceptions about people from Simi Valley and about people from South-Central," Davenport said.
NEWS
May 26, 1990 | PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As dusk fell on the U.S.-Mexico border Thursday, hundreds of motorists gathered along a roadway here and shined their headlights toward groups of uninterested migrants waiting patiently for nightfall at the boundary line. Facing directly into the harsh beams of light, counter-protesters chanting No mas racismo! (No more racism!) held up mirrors and sheets of dark plastic in an attempt to reflect the lights back to the north.
NEWS
January 22, 1991 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Across the social and cultural experiment known as Southern California--where scores of nationalities from around the world have created a sprawling patchwork of coexistence--an immediate challenge of the Persian Gulf conflict is keeping peace at home. Among the region's millions are 700,000 Jews and 300,000 Arab-Americans--Iraqis, Kuwaitis, Palestinians, Jordanians and others.
NEWS
February 13, 1989 | PAULA POINDEXTER-WILSON and MARY ELLEN HOUSE
According to research, children first learn prejudice from their parents. This happens around age 5. By age 7, children begin to mimic their parents' racial attitudes and behavior. And by age 9, most of their racial attitudes and behavior are fully developed. How children feel and act toward racial, ethnic and religious minority groups is a direct result of what they learn from their parents, child-care providers, teachers, grandparents, aunts and uncles, peers and the media.
NEWS
February 13, 1989 | TERRY SCHWADRON, Times Staff Writer
I know the feelings undoubtedly are well-intentioned, but here's a modest proposal for Christmas celebrations that start earlier and earlier each year, that appear in more of our institutions each year: Keep them to those who want to celebrate the holiday. From a Jewish point of view (probably a Buddhist or Muslim point of view, too), America has no faster, more effective way of telling some of us that we are different, that we are supposed to belong where we do not.
NEWS
February 13, 1989 | CAROL BRADLEY SHIRLEY, Times Staff Writer
In December, 1987, I bought a house in South-Central Los Angeles and moved there from the Fairfax District. I expected my life to change. I was a new homeowner in a neighborhood with not the best of reputations. With the newspaper stories about gang and drug problems in mind, I was braced for problems with the people who would be my neighbors. Instead, I found that my real problems were with the city. Services I took for granted in the Fairfax District were nonexistent in my new neighborhood.
NEWS
February 13, 1989 | ROBERT A. JONES, Times Staff Writer and There has been ethnic humor as long as there have been ethnic groups. Sometimes funny, sometimes vicious, ethnic comedy has grown more widespread and more controversial. Paul Rodriguez talked to Times staff writer Robert A. Jones about his feelings toward the comedy he uses
I've been on a couple of talk shows where the host asks me why I do jokes about low-riders, gangs, stuff like that. And you know what? That host always wants to hear me making excuses, like how I think that ethnic humor is really aimed at improving race relations. Like how it's a safety valve or something like that. I won't say those things because it's a cop-out. What purpose, pray tell, does it serve when you make jokes that do nothing but reinforce stereotypes?
NEWS
June 14, 1992 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
White supremacist Richard Barrett, whose recent Simi Valley parade was aborted by police after a violent counterdemonstration erupted, says he wants to return for a second try, this time under the protection of the National Guard. "We will be in touch with the city and the county and governor's office," Barrett said by telephone from his Mississippi office last week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1992 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Something stirred inside James A. White that Wednesday night, that infamous evening after the verdicts in the Rodney G. King beating case were read and riots erupted in Los Angeles. White, a Riverside tire dealer who is black, ran to his telephone and began calling everyone he knew in the community--friends, businessmen, school trustees--inviting them all to his house.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1992 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Something stirred inside James A. White that Wednesday night, that infamous evening after the verdicts in the Rodney G. King beating case were read and riots erupted in Los Angeles. White, a Riverside tire dealer who is black, ran to his telephone and began calling everyone he knew in the community--friends, businessmen, school trustees--inviting them all to his house.
NEWS
March 12, 1992 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California may be half a world away from bloody ethnic clashes in Armenia and bitter racial conflicts in South Africa, but the region shares many of the problems of race and ethnicity dividing countries around the globe. That was the consensus of young government and business leaders from Southern California and a dozen foreign countries who met Wednesday for a round-table discussion in downtown Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1991 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A family has sued the Santa Monica Police Department for $10 million, saying they were victimized by a racially motivated police rampage outside their home six months ago. Two brothers, Jose and Octavio Franco, allege in the lawsuit that they were enjoying a peaceful Valentine's Day at their Pico Corridor-area home when officers "came crashing" into their yard and beat them with batons, flashlights and closed fists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1991 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Justice Department on Monday announced that it will convene a closed-door two-day meeting with 20 Los Angeles County police chiefs and 60 minority community representatives to discuss easing tensions over police use of force--but the LAPD said Chief Daryl F. Gates will not attend. "It's most likely we will be represented, but it will not be by Chief Gates," said Lt. Fred Nixon, an LAPD spokesman.
NEWS
June 14, 1991 | ELAINE WOO and KIM KOWSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It started as a teen-age prank: Dennis had hidden Albert's notebook. One boy started pushing, the other shoved back. Soon, the two high school students were pounding each other with their fists. The scuffle, as Dennis sees it, went deeper than it seemed. Dennis is black and Albert is Latino. In junior high, they had been friends.
NEWS
November 12, 1989 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three miles offshore from Newport Beach, Ha Tan Bang stood on the rolling deck of the Saint Ann as a few purple, foot-long sea creatures known as slime eels slithered past. The Vietnam-born fisherman has been scouring the ocean muck for the last nine months in search of this hideous-looking eel--a creature most fishermen disdain. Even Ha was shocked the first time he saw one and thought: "Do I really want to do this?"
NEWS
June 14, 1991 | ELAINE WOO and KIM KOWSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It started as a teen-age prank: Dennis had hidden Albert's notebook. One boy started pushing, the other shoved back. Soon, the two high school students were pounding each other with their fists. The scuffle, as Dennis sees it, went deeper than it seemed. Dennis is black and Albert is Latino. In junior high, they had been friends.
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