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December 20, 1990 | KARL FLEMING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Karl Fleming covered the civil rights movement as a correspondent for Newsweek magazine. He now is a communications consultant based in Los Angeles. and
Like 1988's "Mississippi Burning," this year's "The Long Walk Home" is another case of Hollywood's telling it like it wasn't about the struggle by blacks to throw off the cruel shackles of the Southern segregation system. "Mississippi Burning" was a grievously distorted version of the 1964 assassination of three civil-rights workers in Philadelphia, Miss. "The Long Walk Home" is a grossly misleading and sentimentalized sugar-coated version of the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott.
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NEWS
June 19, 1996 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arming federal law enforcement agents with new weapons as they attempt to snuff out a rash of arson attacks on black churches across the South, the House voted Tuesday to make it easier to prosecute such crimes as federal offenses. The legislation, which passed on a voice vote, would eliminate the $10,000 minimum damage threshold currently required to trigger federal involvement in the prosecution of property crimes against churches, synagogues or other places of worship.
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NEWS
July 19, 1995 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Tyrone Brooks was a child growing up in rural Georgia, he learned from his elders that the freakish outcropping of granite east of Atlanta known as Stone Mountain was a frightful--even evil--place. The Ku Klux Klan marked its rebirth early this century by torching a cross upon its peak. And in olden times, his grandmother told him, black people had been lynched and thrown from the mountaintop. "I did not grow up with a good feeling about Stone Mountain," Brooks said.
NEWS
June 19, 1996 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a professed spirit of "repentance" for the past sins of white Southern Christianity, Christian Coalition Executive Director Ralph Reed called Tuesday for a day of national racial reconciliation and pledged that his organization would raise at least $1 million to help rebuild African American churches that have been burned.
NEWS
December 18, 1988 | TAYLOR BRANCH
Shortly after Robert Kennedy took over the Justice Department, he found himself at loggerheads with FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover. An unwitting Martin Luther King Jr. would soon find himself a pawn in the attorney general's continuing battle to protect his brother, John F . Kennedy, the President, from the FBI chief. The running battle between Robert Kennedy and J. Edgar Hoover began in the early days of J. F. K. 's Administration.
NEWS
March 9, 1987 | DAVID TREADWELL, Times Staff Writer
Whenever seven-term state Rep. Alvin Holmes looks up at the dome of the historic Alabama Statehouse here, his blood begins to boil. The Confederate flag flying there may be a symbol of pride to others in Montgomery, the state capital and self-styled "Cradle of the Confederacy." But to Holmes, who is black, the Rebel banner stands for something radically different. "I see the flag of a defunct and disgraced nation, one that wanted to hold my forebears in slavery," he said.
NEWS
October 30, 1990 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A week before Election Day, the Deep South is caught in a struggle between its racist past and its present quest to be truly "new." In Alabama, for example, the issue of race is so pungent that the incumbent white Republican governor only needed to run pictures of his white Democratic challenger sitting in a car with a black man to bring charges of racism.
NEWS
June 19, 1996 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arming federal law enforcement agents with new weapons as they attempt to snuff out a rash of arson attacks on black churches across the South, the House voted Tuesday to make it easier to prosecute such crimes as federal offenses. The legislation, which passed on a voice vote, would eliminate the $10,000 minimum damage threshold currently required to trigger federal involvement in the prosecution of property crimes against churches, synagogues or other places of worship.
NEWS
December 14, 1988 | TAYLOR BRANCH
In 1955, Martin Luther King was a relative unknown, the novice pastor of Dexter Baptist Church in Montgomery, Ala. But by year's end, his name was a household word. His rise from obscurity to national prominence began in December, when Rosa Parks defied segregation laws in her home town, Montgomery, Ala. Her action and King's response would help forever change the nation . On Dec.
NEWS
February 26, 1990 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inside the tiny log building--a museum made from three slave cabins--dusty pieces of history testify mutely but powerfully. On the hearth sit iron pots and skillets that were used to cook white folks' meals, to make their tea. Hanging on the wall are a wooden rake and a "brush broom" that neated up their dirt yards. Look to the left, and a huge stone fireplace recalls long nights of bitter talk about hard times.
NEWS
June 15, 1996 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Lee Johnson's days on Earth have not been marked by high achievement, but the 34-year-old construction worker can hold a grudge with the best of them. He was drinking on Super Bowl Sunday last year when he got to talking about how gamblers at the Sweetie Pettie Dewdrop Inn had done him wrong. "They suckered me out of my money" is how Johnson phrased it later. He used to shoot dice at the tavern, perched on a country road about an hour south of Nashville.
NEWS
July 19, 1995 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Tyrone Brooks was a child growing up in rural Georgia, he learned from his elders that the freakish outcropping of granite east of Atlanta known as Stone Mountain was a frightful--even evil--place. The Ku Klux Klan marked its rebirth early this century by torching a cross upon its peak. And in olden times, his grandmother told him, black people had been lynched and thrown from the mountaintop. "I did not grow up with a good feeling about Stone Mountain," Brooks said.
NEWS
May 30, 1993 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even Dicky Sistrunk finds it peculiar, the way the lights went out almost as soon as Scott Campbell landed in jail. A whole side of this Mississippi town went black for more than an hour for reasons nobody could fathom. When the lights came back on, Campbell was dead. Sistrunk, a police officer for only eight months, found the young black man strung up by his pants leg from a bar of his cell.
NEWS
June 9, 1992 | GARRY BOULARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
More than 1,700 miles separate the stately campus of Tulane University from the center of Los Angeles, but to George Strickler, the places have almost become one. "There's an unfortunate parallel between this university and Los Angeles," said Strickler, an associate professor of law at Tulane. "We both have had a racial problem to deal with, and we've both, in my opinion, failed in that effort. In Los Angeles, there's been rioting in the streets, an agitation for change.
NEWS
May 29, 1992 | ERIC HARRISON and EDITH STANLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
More than a century after the end of the Civil War, the governor of Georgia thinks it is time to lower the Confederate battle flag for good. Bowing to pressure from civil rights groups and others who called the emblem offensive and an embarrassment to the state, Gov. Zell Miller said Thursday he will introduce a measure when the Legislature convenes in January to change the Georgia flag, which currently incorporates the striking red and blue design of the Confederacy.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1991 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Ralph Ellison's influential novel "The Invisible Man" traces a black man's search for identity amid a white culture that sees "only my surroundings, themselves or figments of their imagination--indeed, everything and anything except me." That comes to mind while watching Lilly Harper, the inspirational black housekeeper in NBC's new series "I'll Fly Away," admonish the smug teen-age son of her white employer. "You don't think I'm here," she tells him, sternly. "I'm here!"
NEWS
January 16, 1990 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With fresh racial incidents as a backdrop, millions of people across the nation celebrated Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday on Monday with a mixture of joy over his legacy and anger that racism and poverty still weigh so heavily on American life.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1988 | SHEILA BENSON
With "Mississippi Burning," director Alan Parker raises more than a few solid questions for reviewers: How much tampering with the facts can be accepted in the name of a good cause? Granted that Parker has insisted that his film is fiction. However, it's fiction set solidly in the facts of the day: The disappearance of three civil rights workers in the first days of the Mississippi Summer Project in 1964.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1990 | KARL FLEMING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Karl Fleming covered the civil rights movement as a correspondent for Newsweek magazine. He now is a communications consultant based in Los Angeles. and
Like 1988's "Mississippi Burning," this year's "The Long Walk Home" is another case of Hollywood's telling it like it wasn't about the struggle by blacks to throw off the cruel shackles of the Southern segregation system. "Mississippi Burning" was a grievously distorted version of the 1964 assassination of three civil-rights workers in Philadelphia, Miss. "The Long Walk Home" is a grossly misleading and sentimentalized sugar-coated version of the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott.
NEWS
October 30, 1990 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A week before Election Day, the Deep South is caught in a struggle between its racist past and its present quest to be truly "new." In Alabama, for example, the issue of race is so pungent that the incumbent white Republican governor only needed to run pictures of his white Democratic challenger sitting in a car with a black man to bring charges of racism.
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