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Racial Relations Texas

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March 30, 1987 | BOB BAKER, Times Staff Writer
Growing up in rural east Texas in the 1930s, Jeanette Adkins often heard her father describe how unknown white men had swindled the family out of most of the huge swath of land that her great-grandfather, a former slave, had settled here after the Civil War. It was a tale told with resignation. A black in Texas, one relative philosophized, was "like a man with a shotgun and no shells--he can't shoot."
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NEWS
April 27, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A state lawmaker asked for an investigation into the death of Clarence Otis Cole, a black man whose body was found hanging from a tree in northeast Texas this month. Cole's family believes he was killed because he was dating a white woman, Rep. Ron Wilson said. Cass County authorities contend Cole, 43, committed suicide. A suicide note read: "I'm sorry. I love you all, but I hate myself. Don't know no other way to fix this. I'm sorry, Love u all."
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NEWS
December 2, 1990 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Wiley Price pumps iron. He drives a Lotus. He is a Dallas County commissioner. He is black. He is angry. And he is the man who has brought the simmering racial tension in this city to near-boiling. Say what you will about John Wiley Price, there is no halfway about him. He has a radical's mind and a showman's disposition, a flare for just the right quote to get him on the evening news and in the morning papers.
NEWS
November 9, 1999 | Associated Press
Testimony in the dragging-death trial of Shawn Allen Berry was delayed one day until Wednesday while the judge reviews a last-minute request to move the trial out of Jasper. Berry's attorney argued Monday that pretrial news coverage and a biased juror pool make getting a fair trial impossible. "It's clear to me that he can't get a fair trial here," said the attorney, Joseph C. Hawthorn.
NEWS
February 9, 1993 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here's how bad things used to be in Vidor: There was a persistent rumor 30-odd years ago that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was going to lead a march on the town because it was one of the meanest, toughest, most bigoted places known to man. Blacks dared not live here. The Ku Klux Klan embraced this place, which was once known as "Bloody Vidor." In these parts, Vidor (founded, incidentally, by the father of famed movie director King Vidor) became the symbol of everything a town shouldn't be.
SPORTS
April 20, 1993 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Walking through a darkened tunnel at the Forum, Don Chaney wears a starched white shirt, a patterned silk tie and a gray suit somber enough to match the mood of the Detroit Pistons. This is a team going nowhere fast and Chaney, an assistant coach, is along for the ride. Not far away, John Tracy is at work on a brightly lighted sound stage at Lorimar Studios.
NEWS
May 4, 1990 | From Tines Staff and Wire Reports
Three white former lawmen were found guilty of murder in the 1987 beating death of a black jail inmate. The all-white jury deliberated for about four hours before finding former Hemphill, Tex., Police Chief Thomas Ladner and former Sabine County sheriff's deputies Billy Ray Horton and James M. Hyden guilty in the death of Loyal Garner Jr. The 34-year-old Florien, La., resident died of head injuries two days after being arrested on drunk driving charges.
NEWS
February 28, 1988
A Ku Klux Klan protest of the Dallas Police Department's new affirmative action hiring plan turned into a melee when an anti-klan group charged the demonstrators. Police clubbed members of the crowd, estimated at about 200, and some protesters suffered minor injuries in the one-hour confrontation, authorities said. Eight people were arrested on minor charges.
NEWS
February 28, 1999 | CLAUDIA KOLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
East Texas police do things differently than when 45-year-old Sgt. James Carter of the Jasper County Sheriff's Office came of age, poor, in the black part of town. Very differently. Thirty years ago, Carter said, local police saw minorities as a kind of outlet for ceaseless, free-floating cruelty. More than once, Carter recalled, he saw a squad car nearing a black man as he walked down the street and the officers ordering the man to duck his head inside the window.
NEWS
February 24, 1999 | CLAUDIA KOLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A jury of 11 whites and one black found white supremacist John William King guilty of capital murder Tuesday for chaining a black man by his ankles and dragging him behind a truck until his head was ripped off on a deserted road outside this east Texas town. The crime, a throwback to racial crimes earlier this century in the South, sparked international repulsion and soul-searching in Jasper, a town of 8,000.
NEWS
February 20, 1999 | From Associated Press
John William King, a white supremacist on trial in the dragging death of a black man, had a shirt in his apartment with the victim's blood, a DNA analyst for the FBI testified Friday. Another witness testified that the denim shirt, along with jeans that had four bloodstains, was worn by Shawn Berry the night James Byrd Jr. was killed. Berry, who is to be tried later, shared an apartment with King.
NEWS
February 19, 1999 | Associated Press
Dragging-death defendant John William King once talked about committing murder as a way to get into a white supremacist gang, a former fellow inmate testified Thursday. "To help new recruits get initiated, take somebody out and kill them. You have to spill blood to get in and give blood to get out, I guess," convicted robber William Hoover testified, recounting what he says King told him while they were both in prison a few years ago.
NEWS
January 28, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A white ex-convict on trial in the dragging death of a black man claimed in a letter to a local newspaper that he was being judged unfairly, but still has "law and order in my heart." As lawyers tried for a third day to pare a 122-member jury pool, the Jasper (Texas) NewsBoy, a twice-weekly paper, published John William King's letter. "I don't know why you are so eager to condemn me for this man's murder when no testimony has yet been heard, and I don't care about that, either," King, 24, wrote.
NEWS
June 28, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
The Ku Klux Klan rallied Saturday, saying it condemned the slaying of a black man who was dragged to his death behind a pickup truck, allegedly by three white men. Black counterdemonstrators carrying guns showed up and police kept the two sides apart. Two men, one black and one white, were arrested for disorderly conduct as the 90-minute klan rally ended. "If nothing else, we've taught Jasper County freedom of speech," klansman Darrell Flinn said. "And we've gotten to denounce the murder."
NEWS
June 27, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The small town of Jasper, where a black man was dragged to his death behind a pickup earlier this month, is bracing for rallies by white supremacists and black activists. Ku Klux Klan groups have permission for a two-hour gathering at which they plan to distance themselves from the killing of 49-year-old James Byrd while promoting "white pride." Members of black Muslim groups and the New Black Panther Party also plan to be in Jasper, saying they want to protect the local black population.
NEWS
June 14, 1998 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sweat and tears bled together in James Byrd Jr.'s hometown Saturday as hundreds of mourners gathered around his steel coffin to honor America's latest symbol of racial hurt and, possibly, healing.
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