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Racial Relations United States

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NEWS
September 28, 1989 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
Rep. Augustus Hawkins, 81, vividly remembers riding a bus in his home town of Los Angeles many years ago when a white woman sat down beside him. "She kept moving over to be next to me," he recalled, "and then she said, 'You know, we sure are getting a lot of blacks in this neighborhood. I don't like sitting next to them because they smell.' " Hawkins, both curious and offended, asked the woman if he smelled.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2001 | HOWARD REICH, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
To people around the world, he was the perpetually grinning black jazzman who brought comic relief to films such as "Hello, Dolly" and "High Society." To many jazz musicians who admired his art but loathed his public persona, he was at best a "clown," as trumpeter Miles Davis once called him, and at worst a promoter of a "plantation image," in the words of Dizzy Gillespie. But as the world celebrates the centennial of Louis Armstrong's birth (the actual date was Aug.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1991 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The associate dean of the Simon Wiesenthal Center, a largely Jewish human rights organization based in Los Angeles, called Friday on four national record chains to stop selling copies of rapper Ice Cube's new album, "Death Certificate."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2001 | STANLEY ALLISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft used an appearance Sunday at the Crystal Cathedral in Garden Grove to issue a national call for personal reconciliation, forgiveness and healing. "We need to treat each other with respect and not operate with prejudice or disdain for one another," the nation's highest-ranking law enforcement official told the Rev. Robert H. Schuller and several thousand people at one of two morning services at which he spoke.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1991 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Do we Americans really dislike the Japanese? What cause do we have for malice? Who among us has been truly threatened, wronged or otherwise hurt as a consequence of Japan's formidable economic power? These questions have been haunting the rarefied debate over U.S.-Japan relations for years, and now a congressional panel is offering a new high-resolution focus for the quandary: racial bias in the workplace.
NEWS
June 22, 1990 | DON SHANNON and SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Nelson Mandela stoutly defended his ties with Palestine Liberation Organization Chairman Yasser Arafat on Thursday, chiding those who he said had tried to misconstrue his position on Israel and saying that "we have no time to look into the internal affairs of other countries." Mandela was questioned on the matter extensively during a "town meeting" segment of ABC-TV's "Nightline" aired Thursday night.
NEWS
December 6, 1990 | GORDON PARKS
In the late 1960s, Gordon Parks achieved yet another milestone when Warner Bros. gave him the opportunity to direct, write the screenplay and compose the music for the film of his first novel, "The Learning Tree." Here is Part V of a five-part excerpt from his autobiography, "Voices in the Mirror." For years I, with everyone else, had justifiably believed that Hollywood would never accept a black director.
NEWS
December 13, 1992 | CHARISSE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mannequins stand poised in a Westside store window, their hats bearing an "X," symbol of a fallen black hero. The red, black and green colors of black nationalism shine on a teen-ager's medallion--the boy with Filipino roots wears Africa on his chest. And in white suburbia, homes pulsate with a slang and rhythm first given voice by African-American youth on urban streets.
NEWS
May 9, 1990 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They run in different social circles, to put it mildly, and have never shared a stage together. But on this night author Tom Wolfe and filmmaker Spike Lee are sitting down to discuss racism in the '90s, and several thousand VIPs have packed a banquet room to watch the show. In New York, where ugly racial incidents are becoming a way of life, the topic is guaranteed to draw a crowd.
NEWS
February 21, 2001 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO and GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the small neighborhoods of aging brick houses on this city's east side, the streets stretching into the suburbs are intersected by roads marking the distance from the downtown core. Eight Mile Road is the city limits, followed by Nine Mile Road and so on. Everybody here knows that, like rungs on the social ladder, you go up to get out. But it was here on the lower rungs a decade ago that a young white kid named Marshall Bruce Mathers III found a different escape from urban poverty.
NEWS
June 24, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 10 years of waiting for new census data and three months of analyzing it, the nation's demographics experts are sharply divided on whether segregation of blacks eased in the 1990s. Three main factions have emerged, offering up the same numbers as proof that (1) integration reached historic levels, (2) integration stalled or (3) what looks like new integration is a temporary mirage. On their debate turns a fundamental notion of American progress.
NEWS
February 21, 2001 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO and GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the small neighborhoods of aging brick houses on this city's east side, the streets stretching into the suburbs are intersected by roads marking the distance from the downtown core. Eight Mile Road is the city limits, followed by Nine Mile Road and so on. Everybody here knows that, like rungs on the social ladder, you go up to get out. But it was here on the lower rungs a decade ago that a young white kid named Marshall Bruce Mathers III found a different escape from urban poverty.
NEWS
February 11, 2001 | From Associated Press
Brother Howshua is certain. The burly black man in the black suit, black leather hat, black boots and spirit to match knows he has the prescription for his people's psychic and financial ills on the piece of paper suffocating in his weathered hands. Now to get the rest of the world on board.
NEWS
February 8, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
White House officials said Wednesday that President Bush would leave largely intact the AIDS and race-relations offices he inherited from the Clinton administration--a seeming reversal after Bush's chief of staff earlier said they would be closed. White House spokesman Ari Fleischer and other senior officials, moving to quell a public relations squall, portrayed Chief of Staff Andrew H. Card Jr. as having made a mistake when he said the two task forces would be abolished.
NEWS
January 15, 2001 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton, a man shaped by the turmoil of segregation that scarred the South, will make one final appeal to the nation today "to continue the work of healing the racial wounds of the past." "Race has been our constant struggle," the president will say in a message to Congress.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
People are not born with a predisposition for prejudice. Hatred and racial injustice are learned as one matures. "It's social," offers Dean Cain. "It's acquired." Prejudice is the central theme of actor Cain's latest project, the "Hallmark Hall of Fame" presentation "The Runaway," premiering Sunday on CBS.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1989 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
A 17-day American fact-finding trip by a Japanese family waging a do-it-yourself fight against anti-black racism in their country has had an unhappy ending in Los Angeles. Luggage containing journals and videotapes chronicling the family's visits with such prominent blacks as the Rev. Jesse Jackson, Atlanta Mayor Andrew Young, Coretta Scott King and Baltimore Orioles baseball manager Frank Robinson disappeared moments after their arrival at Los Angeles International Airport.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1991 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Judith Michaelson is a Times staff writer
In the opening scene of "Teech," a comedy series that debuted on CBS on Wednesday, a music teacher reports for an expected job at a preppy, all-white boys' school. But because he is black, the headmaster's secretary assumes he is a workman and tells him to go "around to the back, use the service entrance, don't walk on the grass, pick the fruit, talk to the students or eat lunch in plain view of anyone." His response: "Can I plant watermelon seeds on the back forty?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2000 | ERIN TEXEIRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Where you going?" the cops asked the teenager lugging his schoolbooks along Vermont Avenue one afternoon last week. "What are you doing?" They pointed to his UC Berkeley cap and clothes, all blue--a color often favored by local gang members. And they said: "You look suspicious." They let him go with a warning, but later that day Wylie Jason Tidwell III, 17, became livid while telling the story to friends. "Suspicious? Me? Why, because I'm black?"
NEWS
March 12, 2000 | From Associated Press
Black leaders must remember the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. and "get into the trenches" to fight racial profiling and attacks on affirmative action, the Rev. Al Sharpton said Saturday at the finale of a voting rights commemoration. "We're here today to reconnect with the giants that brought us this far," he told about 500 people in the same downtown Montgomery church where King preached in the 1950s.
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