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NEWS
June 7, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ethnic unrest sparked by a quarrel over 79 acres of land spread throughout the mountain-laced republic of Kirghizia on the Sino-Soviet border, with thousands of youths massing in the capital Wednesday to call for the blood of more Uzbeks. Anatoly A. Lukyanov, chairman of the Supreme Soviet (national legislature), told lawmakers in Moscow that 40 people had been killed as the violence entered its third day.
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NEWS
September 4, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the right-wing junta took power in Moscow, many of the Russian workers at the Poogelmann Factory here greeted each other with the phrase, S prazdnikom-- Happy holiday! But just two weeks later, their Russian director has been sacked and is facing criminal charges for supporting the coup. The factory, which was Soviet-owned, has been taken over by an almost-free Estonia.
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NEWS
November 1, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moldovan militants by the thousands besieged checkpoints on the Soviet-Romanian frontier Wednesday and threatened to massacre KGB border guards as an ethnic quarrel in the southwestern Soviet Union ballooned into revolt against Communist rule, reports from state-run media said.
NEWS
May 5, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tens of thousands of Armenians flowed through the streets of their capital on Saturday, mourning victims of violence against their countrymen in neighboring Azerbaijan that their president called a premeditated pogrom against peaceful civilians by Kremlin troops. "They died for their homeland, and thus they will live forever," Galstyan Ambartsyum, the mayor of Yerevan, told a crowd gathered in Freedom Square, according to the Armenpress news service.
NEWS
June 24, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Faced with renewed communal violence, the Soviet government has deployed troops to keep the peace between Armenians and Azerbaijanis in the disputed region of Nagorno-Karabakh, the Communist Party newspaper Pravda reported Thursday.
NEWS
December 4, 1988 | Associated Press
Kremlin officials beefed up security at airports and power plants in the republics of Azerbaijan and Armenia on Saturday and scrambled to aid an estimated 150,000 refugees who have fled their homes in fear of ethnic violence, Soviet media reported. The Moscow leadership also ripped into the Communist Party and government leaders of the rival republics for failing to halt the wave of communal rioting that has killed at least 28 people.
NEWS
March 2, 1988 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Soviet troops enforced a strict curfew Tuesday to prevent further ethnic rioting in Sumgait, an industrial city about 20 miles north of Baku in the Soviet republic of Azerbaijan. The outburst caused deep concern in Moscow. Kremlin leaders conferred on what steps they might take to restore normalcy in the republic.
NEWS
November 28, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, facing resurgent nationalism from many of the Soviet Union's ethnic minorities and communal violence in two of the country's republics, declared Sunday that, however liberal his policies, he is determined to uphold the unity of the country.
NEWS
October 3, 1988
Worsening ethnic tensions have forced about 1,000 Azerbaijanis to flee the disputed Armenian enclave of Nagorno-Karabakh, and Armenians in the Azerbaijani city of Agdam are under special military protection to prevent violence, the Soviet Communist Party newspaper Pravda said.
NEWS
August 18, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet leadership Thursday proposed "radical transformations" in the Kremlin's dealings with that nation's 15 republics and suggested that ethnic minorities who oppose Soviet laws be permitted to "question" them before a high court. But at the same time, the country's leaders, in a sweeping policy statement, sought to put general limits on how far activists can go in pressing for minority rights.
NEWS
May 3, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armenian officials accused the Kremlin on Thursday of throwing its armed might behind their Azerbaijani foes in the worst flare-up of the ethnic enmity between the two peoples in months--attacks on two villages this week that left 36 Armenians reported dead. "This is a new stage, the stage of war," Seda Vermisheva, an Armenian writer and member of the Armenian Parliament, told a news conference at the Armenian mission in Moscow.
NEWS
November 1, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moldovan militants by the thousands besieged checkpoints on the Soviet-Romanian frontier Wednesday and threatened to massacre KGB border guards as an ethnic quarrel in the southwestern Soviet Union ballooned into revolt against Communist rule, reports from state-run media said.
NEWS
October 13, 1990 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a court case without precedent in the Soviet Union, an ultra-nationalist Russian was sentenced Friday to two years at hard labor for stirring up ethnic hatred at a time of increasing anti-Semitism here. Konstantin Smirnov-Ostashvili, 54, a leader of the right-wing Pamyat Society, was convicted of leading an attack on Jewish writers. He was prosecuted under a Soviet law intended to ensure harmony among the country's 100 or more ethnic groups.
NEWS
August 5, 1990 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of Russians have fled their homes in Soviet Central Asia over the last six months, afraid of becoming the next victims of growing anti-Russian violence and giving still more proof of the ethnic tensions that threaten to tear this country apart.
NEWS
July 25, 1990 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rowdy supporters of a man charged with inciting hostility against Jews forced a Soviet judge Tuesday to adjourn the man's trial almost before it began in a case that has become the symbol of blatant and growing anti-Semitism among Russian nationalists.
NEWS
July 23, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anti-Semitism is growing rapidly in the Soviet Union, the Communist Party newspaper Pravda acknowledged Sunday, and it now threatens to undermine the country's political and economic reforms. Pravda denounced not only the open anti-Semitism of groups on the far right, such as the nationalistic Pamyat, which blame Jews for all the country's problems past and present, but also that of Russian nationalists who use anti-Semitism in their efforts to revive Russian culture.
NEWS
January 17, 1989 | From Reuters
More than 2,500 Communist Party members and government officials have been disciplined over ethnic conflict in Soviet Azerbaijan, the official Tass news agency reported Monday. Many were fired from their jobs and expelled from the party and the Komsomol, the party's youth organization, as part of a major reshuffle in the republic, Tass said. Those affected were either actively involved in demonstrations, assisted them or failed to take measures to stop them, the report said.
NEWS
June 7, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ethnic unrest sparked by a quarrel over 79 acres of land spread throughout the mountain-laced republic of Kirghizia on the Sino-Soviet border, with thousands of youths massing in the capital Wednesday to call for the blood of more Uzbeks. Anatoly A. Lukyanov, chairman of the Supreme Soviet (national legislature), told lawmakers in Moscow that 40 people had been killed as the violence entered its third day.
NEWS
April 6, 1990 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Preliminary survey results released Thursday indicate that anti-Semitism is on the rise in the Soviet Union, and Jewish leaders who commissioned the ambitious study said it confirms their worst fears. Nearly half of the respondents in the survey conducted for the American Jewish Committee said anti-Semitism is growing, and only 18% of the respondents indicated a liking for Jews. Sholom D.
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