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Racial Relations Virgin Islands Of The United States

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NEWS
September 28, 1989 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
Police Capt. Jerry Swan, standing on the docks of Gallows Bay on the formerly beautiful island of St. Croix, gazed toward Recovery Hill, once lush and green, now browned by Hurricane Hugo, dotted with homes missing walls and roofs. "See that house up there?" he said, pointing to a huge, once-opulent structure on the summit. "Now it's on the same level as that guy's down there," pointing to a far more modest home down the slope. Both had suffered extensive damage, both were uninhabitable.
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NEWS
September 28, 1989 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
Police Capt. Jerry Swan, standing on the docks of Gallows Bay on the formerly beautiful island of St. Croix, gazed toward Recovery Hill, once lush and green, now browned by Hurricane Hugo, dotted with homes missing walls and roofs. "See that house up there?" he said, pointing to a huge, once-opulent structure on the summit. "Now it's on the same level as that guy's down there," pointing to a far more modest home down the slope. Both had suffered extensive damage, both were uninhabitable.
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NEWS
September 21, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
For years, St. Croix has worked hard to perfect its image as the perfect resort, a Caribbean paradise with a touch of Danish heritage, bathed by hibiscus-flavored trade winds and encircled by white, sandy beaches and warm, sparkling seas. The effort has been largely successful, with more than 1 million tourists visiting St. Croix and its two neighboring islands, which together--along with dozens of smaller islands--make up the Virgin Islands of the United States.
NEWS
September 21, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
For years, St. Croix has worked hard to perfect its image as the perfect resort, a Caribbean paradise with a touch of Danish heritage, bathed by hibiscus-flavored trade winds and encircled by white, sandy beaches and warm, sparkling seas. The effort has been largely successful, with more than 1 million tourists visiting St. Croix and its two neighboring islands, which together--along with dozens of smaller islands--make up the Virgin Islands of the United States.
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