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NEWS
January 28, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
A special city commission reviewing the racially tinged violence that gripped Virginia Beach, Va., last Labor Day weekend has concluded that city leaders failed to plan properly for the event or to communicate adequately with black leaders, panel members say.
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NEWS
January 28, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
A special city commission reviewing the racially tinged violence that gripped Virginia Beach, Va., last Labor Day weekend has concluded that city leaders failed to plan properly for the event or to communicate adequately with black leaders, panel members say.
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NEWS
April 12, 1987
Colonial Heights, Va., was the scene of a white protest march to counter black allegations of housing and hiring discrimination there. Police Chief John Wolford said that the demonstration, in which about 100 people paraded for a mile and shouted, "White Power!" drew few black spectators, and added: "We couldn't identify anyone from Colonial Heights." The protest was organized by the Southern National Front, which promotes the idea of separate nations for the races.
NEWS
December 27, 1989 | From Times staff and Wire reports
The Virginia Army National Guard performed "in a highly professional manner" during Sept. 1-5 disturbances in Virginia Beach, Va., according to findings of an independent review announced by the National Guard Bureau in Washington. Lt. Gen. Herbert R. Temple Jr., bureau chief, said reviewers found no evidence that delays in deployment of the Guard on Sept. 3 contributed to looting and vandalism. Temple said no instance of physical abuse by a Guard member had been verified.
NEWS
December 27, 1989 | From Times staff and Wire reports
The Virginia Army National Guard performed "in a highly professional manner" during Sept. 1-5 disturbances in Virginia Beach, Va., according to findings of an independent review announced by the National Guard Bureau in Washington. Lt. Gen. Herbert R. Temple Jr., bureau chief, said reviewers found no evidence that delays in deployment of the Guard on Sept. 3 contributed to looting and vandalism. Temple said no instance of physical abuse by a Guard member had been verified.
NEWS
September 6, 1989
The U.S. Justice Department said it may investigate whether authorities used excessive force to quell weekend riots in Virginia Beach, Va., but local officials defended the actions of police and National Guard troops. "It's incredible that (the officers) were able to restore law and order without firing a single shot or using fatal force," City Manager Aubrey V. Watts Jr. said.
NEWS
November 8, 1989 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Looking out over a cheering crowd of black and white supporters, L. Douglas Wilder declared Tuesday night that he had become the nation's first elected black governor, even though nearly complete returns showed he held only a slender lead. He made no reference to the historic nature of his strong showing, saying only that the message sent was that "negative campaigns work everywhere but in Virginia."
NEWS
November 16, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Howard University student charged with violating a riot control ordinance during Labor Day weekend unrest was acquitted as about 100 students protested Virginia Beach's handling of the Greekfest. A judge dismissed the charge against Quinton Stovell, 23, after hearing conflicting testimony. Stovell was one of more than 1,000 people who were cited or arrested during the holiday weekend bash, which left more than 100 businesses damaged or looted.
NEWS
November 8, 1989 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Democrat David N. Dinkins became New York City's first black mayor by defeating Republican Rudolph W. Giuliani on Tuesday, while Democrat L. Douglas Wilder, a grandson of slaves, claimed the Virginia governorship in a close contest with Republican J. Marshall Coleman. The apparent victory for Wilder, now Virginia's lieutenant governor, would make him the first black to win election as a governor in U.S. history.
NEWS
November 16, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Howard University student charged with violating a riot control ordinance during Labor Day weekend unrest was acquitted as about 100 students protested Virginia Beach's handling of the Greekfest. A judge dismissed the charge against Quinton Stovell, 23, after hearing conflicting testimony. Stovell was one of more than 1,000 people who were cited or arrested during the holiday weekend bash, which left more than 100 businesses damaged or looted.
NEWS
November 8, 1989 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Looking out over a cheering crowd of black and white supporters, L. Douglas Wilder declared Tuesday night that he had become the nation's first elected black governor, even though nearly complete returns showed he held only a slender lead. He made no reference to the historic nature of his strong showing, saying only that the message sent was that "negative campaigns work everywhere but in Virginia."
NEWS
November 8, 1989 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Democrat David N. Dinkins became New York City's first black mayor by defeating Republican Rudolph W. Giuliani on Tuesday, while Democrat L. Douglas Wilder, a grandson of slaves, claimed the Virginia governorship in a close contest with Republican J. Marshall Coleman. The apparent victory for Wilder, now Virginia's lieutenant governor, would make him the first black to win election as a governor in U.S. history.
NEWS
September 6, 1989
The U.S. Justice Department said it may investigate whether authorities used excessive force to quell weekend riots in Virginia Beach, Va., but local officials defended the actions of police and National Guard troops. "It's incredible that (the officers) were able to restore law and order without firing a single shot or using fatal force," City Manager Aubrey V. Watts Jr. said.
NEWS
April 12, 1987
Colonial Heights, Va., was the scene of a white protest march to counter black allegations of housing and hiring discrimination there. Police Chief John Wolford said that the demonstration, in which about 100 people paraded for a mile and shouted, "White Power!" drew few black spectators, and added: "We couldn't identify anyone from Colonial Heights." The protest was organized by the Southern National Front, which promotes the idea of separate nations for the races.
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