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NEWS
January 17, 1989 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
When this city recently celebrated the lavish renovation of its Union Station, limousines lined up at the curbs outside the elegant old train terminal and richly dressed men and women partied into the night. Although the vast majority of Washingtonians are black, the huge main waiting room was a sea of white faces--with only occasional flecks of black here and there. Last fall, about 200 people attended a stately reception at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History.
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NEWS
February 18, 1997 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Schoolhouse scuffles break out every day, but they don't lead to grand jury investigations, result in front-page newspaper stories, expose raw racial tensions or rock the very foundations of local government. Usually, they are over as quickly as they begin, with the offending parties hauled off to see the principal.
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NEWS
August 11, 1990 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a black thing. You wouldn't understand. --Slogan often displayed by African-Americans Emily Feistritzer, a 49-year-old white Washingtonian, just can't make any sense of it. She is trying hard, struggling with the best of intentions to understand the incomprehensible: Why do so many black residents turn out at rallies and church meetings to cheer and praise Washington Mayor Marion Barry?
NEWS
May 10, 1991 | From United Press International
Mayor Sharon Pratt Dixon lifted a curfew in the capital's riot-torn neighborhoods on Thursday but said she would reinstate it if more signs of unrest surface. Although police said they had arrested 60 more people for violating the curfew Wednesday, the streets were mostly calm for a second consecutive night in the Mt. Pleasant and Adams-Morgan areas. Rioting broke out Sunday in the racially mixed neighborhoods after a black policewoman shot and wounded a Salvadoran man.
NEWS
May 10, 1991 | From United Press International
Mayor Sharon Pratt Dixon lifted a curfew in the capital's riot-torn neighborhoods on Thursday but said she would reinstate it if more signs of unrest surface. Although police said they had arrested 60 more people for violating the curfew Wednesday, the streets were mostly calm for a second consecutive night in the Mt. Pleasant and Adams-Morgan areas. Rioting broke out Sunday in the racially mixed neighborhoods after a black policewoman shot and wounded a Salvadoran man.
NEWS
July 4, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's capital sits transfixed as its embattled mayor listens to courtroom accusations that he tied contracts to sexual favors and as he watches a videotape showing him smoking crack cocaine. In a parallel drama taking shape on street corners and talk shows and in public rallies, discussion has assumed a new and angry dimension. As the charges have piled up in court against Mayor Marion Barry, his supporters have grown proportionately restless.
NEWS
July 6, 1987 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
At a time when Congress is once again considering legislation to make most of the District of Columbia into New Columbia, the 51st state, the district's government is staggering under a barrage of scandals involving everything from fraud, bribery and extortion to cocaine use, philandering and faulty snow removal. The resulting turmoil has sullied the image of the nation's capital, enmeshed its nationally known black leader--Mayor Marion S. Barry Jr.
NEWS
August 16, 1987 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
The District of Columbia has always suffered from an identity crisis--and with good reason. Carved from Maryland and Virginia in 1790, it has undergone a series of design plans and styles of government. It is more than a city but not quite the state it yearns to be. It cannot decide whether it is Southern or Northern. It is two cities in one: a federal city with modern office buildings and granite monuments; and a local city, with stately homes but also rotting shells from 1968 riots.
NEWS
February 18, 1997 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Schoolhouse scuffles break out every day, but they don't lead to grand jury investigations, result in front-page newspaper stories, expose raw racial tensions or rock the very foundations of local government. Usually, they are over as quickly as they begin, with the offending parties hauled off to see the principal.
NEWS
January 19, 1990 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
District of Columbia Mayor Marion Barry, who has been dogged by accusations of drug use for the past five years, was arrested Thursday night by FBI agents and local police on charges of purchasing crack cocaine from undercover operatives. Jay P. Stephens, U.S. attorney for Washington, and Thomas E. DuHadway, special agent in charge of the FBI's office here, said Barry was arrested shortly after 8 p.m.
NEWS
August 11, 1990 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a black thing. You wouldn't understand. --Slogan often displayed by African-Americans Emily Feistritzer, a 49-year-old white Washingtonian, just can't make any sense of it. She is trying hard, struggling with the best of intentions to understand the incomprehensible: Why do so many black residents turn out at rallies and church meetings to cheer and praise Washington Mayor Marion Barry?
NEWS
July 4, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's capital sits transfixed as its embattled mayor listens to courtroom accusations that he tied contracts to sexual favors and as he watches a videotape showing him smoking crack cocaine. In a parallel drama taking shape on street corners and talk shows and in public rallies, discussion has assumed a new and angry dimension. As the charges have piled up in court against Mayor Marion Barry, his supporters have grown proportionately restless.
NEWS
January 19, 1990 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
District of Columbia Mayor Marion Barry, who has been dogged by accusations of drug use for the past five years, was arrested Thursday night by FBI agents and local police on charges of purchasing crack cocaine from undercover operatives. Jay P. Stephens, U.S. attorney for Washington, and Thomas E. DuHadway, special agent in charge of the FBI's office here, said Barry was arrested shortly after 8 p.m.
NEWS
January 17, 1989 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
When this city recently celebrated the lavish renovation of its Union Station, limousines lined up at the curbs outside the elegant old train terminal and richly dressed men and women partied into the night. Although the vast majority of Washingtonians are black, the huge main waiting room was a sea of white faces--with only occasional flecks of black here and there. Last fall, about 200 people attended a stately reception at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History.
NEWS
August 16, 1987 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
The District of Columbia has always suffered from an identity crisis--and with good reason. Carved from Maryland and Virginia in 1790, it has undergone a series of design plans and styles of government. It is more than a city but not quite the state it yearns to be. It cannot decide whether it is Southern or Northern. It is two cities in one: a federal city with modern office buildings and granite monuments; and a local city, with stately homes but also rotting shells from 1968 riots.
NEWS
July 6, 1987 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
At a time when Congress is once again considering legislation to make most of the District of Columbia into New Columbia, the 51st state, the district's government is staggering under a barrage of scandals involving everything from fraud, bribery and extortion to cocaine use, philandering and faulty snow removal. The resulting turmoil has sullied the image of the nation's capital, enmeshed its nationally known black leader--Mayor Marion S. Barry Jr.
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