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Racial Relations Zimbabwe

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July 29, 1989 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
It was while watching a street battle in South Africa that Bruce Moore-King felt the first stirrings of disgust at his role years earlier as a white soldier in Rhodesia. "I saw the police fire on some black children from an armored car," he recalled from the porch of his isolated bungalow outside Harare, the Zimbabwean capital. "My first reaction as an ex-soldier was that it was shameful to fire from an armored car. It shocked me, and I began to see what it was to have been a Rhodesian."
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NEWS
August 2, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Zimbabwe has confirmed plans to take more than half the white-owned farmland in the country without paying for it and redistribute it to 500,000 poor black families. The government previously said it would confiscate 804 farms, but in a statement late Monday, it announced the sharp increase, saying more than 3,000 farms will be resettled.
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NEWS
August 1, 1987 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Not long after Ian D. Smith relinquished control of his resilient little anti-Communist, white-ruled country to the black majority, a newcomer moved in next door to his suburban Harare home--the Cuban Embassy. Smith now uses the embassy sign out by the main road to give directions to his house. "At least they're good for something," he said recently. "We didn't have embassies all over the globe when I was prime minister," he added.
NEWS
July 1, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The black squatters who occupied the land of white commercial farmer Neil Conradie two months ago were belligerent at first. They stuck abusive notes on his gate. They called him a "white pig" and taunted him to go back to his "own country," though Conradie's family has lived in Zimbabwe for generations. Gradually, the squatters calmed down and most left, returning to their home regions for last weekend's parliamentary election.
NEWS
August 2, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Zimbabwe has confirmed plans to take more than half the white-owned farmland in the country without paying for it and redistribute it to 500,000 poor black families. The government previously said it would confiscate 804 farms, but in a statement late Monday, it announced the sharp increase, saying more than 3,000 farms will be resettled.
NEWS
April 21, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A day after leaders of armed squatters who have violently occupied white-owned farms in Zimbabwe pledged to halt the bloodshed, two more homesteads were reportedly torched Thursday and several black farm workers, apparently regarded as white sympathizers, were assaulted. Although Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe prepared to host talks on the issue today with regional leaders, political observers were only cautiously optimistic that an end to the turmoil is anywhere in sight.
NEWS
April 15, 2000 | From Associated Press
White farmers said black squatters invaded at least five more white-owned farms Friday, despite a court ruling against them and a government plea for an end to the occupations of hundreds of farms. Though Zimbabwe's High Court ruled Thursday that the government must remove the squatters, there was no apparent police action against the occupiers. However, much of the violence that has plagued the white-owned farms in recent days has dissipated, and squatters left several farms Friday.
NEWS
April 23, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Police monitored some occupied farms in Zimbabwe today as white landowners watched for signs of a break in violence after President Robert Mugabe met with leaders from neighboring nations. The first day of relative calm was marred Saturday by a small bomb apparently aimed at the offices of Zimbabwe's only independent newspaper. No one was injured in the blast, which destroyed the facade of a gallery next to the offices of the Daily News, a fierce critic of Mugabe.
NEWS
April 20, 2000 | From Associated Press
After a week of heightened violence on white-owned farms across Zimbabwe, a leader of squatters occupying the properties pledged Wednesday to end hostilities--but not to leave the land. Squatters would remain in place while their leaders work peaceably toward a negotiated end to the 2-month-old occupations, said Chenjerai Hunzvi, leader of a group of veterans of Zimbabwe's independence war that initially led the farm invasions.
NEWS
April 25, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Mobs assaulted and threatened black workers on white-owned farms and set fire to a tobacco operation, a farmers group said, a continuation of the political violence that has plagued Zimbabwe in recent months. An unspecified number of workers were being treated at a hospital in the provincial center of Marondera, 45 miles southeast of Harare, the capital, according to the Commercial Farmers Union. The extent of their injuries was unclear.
NEWS
May 15, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Squatters have occupied former Prime Minister Ian D. Smith's farm, Smith's son said--a new development in the months-long takeover of more than 1,000 white-owned Zimbabwe farms by armed squatters who say the land is rightfully theirs. About 50 people moved onto Smith's 4,000-acre cattle ranch Saturday, said his son, Alec Smith. The elder Smith, 81, led the nation from 1965 to 1979, when it was known as Rhodesia and was ruled by a white minority government.
NEWS
April 28, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The warning came to Neville Tapson and his son one recent night that squatters were on their way to their tobacco and livestock farm. The Tapsons were expecting them. Two weeks earlier, invaders had planted pegs marking off sections of the 7,400-acre ranch. Terrified, the elderly white farmer, his wife and their son abandoned most of their belongings and fled to a neighbor's house.
NEWS
April 25, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Mobs assaulted and threatened black workers on white-owned farms and set fire to a tobacco operation, a farmers group said, a continuation of the political violence that has plagued Zimbabwe in recent months. An unspecified number of workers were being treated at a hospital in the provincial center of Marondera, 45 miles southeast of Harare, the capital, according to the Commercial Farmers Union. The extent of their injuries was unclear.
NEWS
April 24, 2000 | From Associated Press
About 200 armed black squatters occupied another white-owned farm and police let them stay Sunday, warning them not to use violence. Squatters and ruling party supporters have seized about 1,000 white-owned farms in what they say is a protest against unequal land distribution; critics call the actions a bid by Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe to rally supporters and intimidate opponents.
NEWS
April 23, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Police monitored some occupied farms in Zimbabwe today as white landowners watched for signs of a break in violence after President Robert Mugabe met with leaders from neighboring nations. The first day of relative calm was marred Saturday by a small bomb apparently aimed at the offices of Zimbabwe's only independent newspaper. No one was injured in the blast, which destroyed the facade of a gallery next to the offices of the Daily News, a fierce critic of Mugabe.
NEWS
April 21, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A day after leaders of armed squatters who have violently occupied white-owned farms in Zimbabwe pledged to halt the bloodshed, two more homesteads were reportedly torched Thursday and several black farm workers, apparently regarded as white sympathizers, were assaulted. Although Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe prepared to host talks on the issue today with regional leaders, political observers were only cautiously optimistic that an end to the turmoil is anywhere in sight.
NEWS
April 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
Zimbabwe's leader vilified white farmers as "enemies of our people" Tuesday, hours after dozens of gunmen besieged a farm and killed a white rancher during the worst spasm of violence in two months of land occupations. On the 20th anniversary of the nation's independence from white rule, President Robert Mugabe accused the farmers of "mobilizing, actually coercing" their workers against his rule and wanting to turn the clock back to the colonial era.
NEWS
May 15, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Squatters have occupied former Prime Minister Ian D. Smith's farm, Smith's son said--a new development in the months-long takeover of more than 1,000 white-owned Zimbabwe farms by armed squatters who say the land is rightfully theirs. About 50 people moved onto Smith's 4,000-acre cattle ranch Saturday, said his son, Alec Smith. The elder Smith, 81, led the nation from 1965 to 1979, when it was known as Rhodesia and was ruled by a white minority government.
NEWS
April 20, 2000 | From Associated Press
After a week of heightened violence on white-owned farms across Zimbabwe, a leader of squatters occupying the properties pledged Wednesday to end hostilities--but not to leave the land. Squatters would remain in place while their leaders work peaceably toward a negotiated end to the 2-month-old occupations, said Chenjerai Hunzvi, leader of a group of veterans of Zimbabwe's independence war that initially led the farm invasions.
NEWS
April 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
Zimbabwe's leader vilified white farmers as "enemies of our people" Tuesday, hours after dozens of gunmen besieged a farm and killed a white rancher during the worst spasm of violence in two months of land occupations. On the 20th anniversary of the nation's independence from white rule, President Robert Mugabe accused the farmers of "mobilizing, actually coercing" their workers against his rule and wanting to turn the clock back to the colonial era.
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