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Racial Unrest

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1992
If George Bush can find troops, marshals, etc., to patrol the streets of Los Angeles, why can't he stop illegal immigrants and deport those already here? That would open up a million jobs for unemployed U.S. citizens in Southern California. But those jobs wouldn't lift people out of poverty unless Bush also allows--and enforces--a minimum wage that is a living wage. Yes, that would raise the price on lettuce and frocks and many other things--a price we should all be very willing to pay. CHARLES T. NEWTON, Del Mar
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WORLD
May 23, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa — A 29-year-old farmworker was convicted Tuesday of the murder of South African white supremacist leader Eugene TerreBlanche, but his teenage companion was acquitted in the killing, which had sparked fears of racial violence. Chris Mahlangu was found guilty of killing TerreBlanche, his employer and longtime advocate of a separate state for white Afrikaners. Patrick Ndlovu, 18, who was 15 and present at the slaying, was found guilty of housebreaking with intent to steal.
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NEWS
January 14, 1986 | United Press International
The uprising at the Indiana Reformatory in which one inmate died and two dozen people were injured was triggered by racial unrest, a corrections department official said Monday. Security will be tightened, the official said, and commissary, recreation, visitation and telephone privileges will be suspended indefinitely at the maximum-security prison because of the disturbance Saturday night.
NATIONAL
September 15, 2007 | Miguel Bustillo, Times Staff Writer
In December, six black boys jumped a white boy at the high school here and beat him while he lay unconscious. The victim was taken to the hospital, but he was not gravely hurt. He attended a class ring ceremony later that evening. The black boys were charged with attempted murder, which threatened to put them in prison for most of their lives. The district attorney alleged they'd used a deadly weapon: their sneakers.
OPINION
November 8, 1992
A rash of violence has broken out in our local high schools. Why not have the movie studios, the television production companies, and the corporate sponsors of television programs that both glorify violence and desensitize our young people to its use foot the bill for needed rigorous security staffing and metal detectors? They profit by it; let them pay for the results of it. MARGO SORENSON, Irvine
NEWS
March 27, 1987 | United Press International
Police today freed the general secretary of the Presbyterian Church of South Africa, a Swiss citizen held without charge for nine months under Pretoria's state of emergency. The Rev. Jean Francois Bill was released under undisclosed restrictions. Bill, who holds a South African passport, was detained without charge a week after President Pieter W. Botha imposed a nationwide state of emergency last June 12 to curb racial unrest.
OPINION
April 13, 2007
Re "His popular novels blended social criticism, dark humor," obituary, April 12 Kurt Vonnegut was our generation's conscience, writing about the horrors of war and assassinations, racial unrest, destruction of the environment and the tribulations of everyday life in his own truly unique way. Whether writing about other worlds or life on Earth, he evoked wisdom and a moralistic message with the help of cynical humor, becoming a modern-day Mark...
NEWS
February 20, 1986 | United Press International
Nobel laureate Bishop Desmond Tutu led a group of church leaders to President Pieter W. Botha's office today for what they thought would be a meeting about racial unrest--but Botha snubbed them. Christian Beyers Naude, leader of the South African Council of Churches, said Tutu and the other clergymen waited at Botha's Cape Town residence for two hours before they were told "the president is not available."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1993
The Sunday issue of Oct. 24 carried two separate but related articles; one covered the rise in racial and ethnic tension in Orange County and the other pointed out the frustrations in addressing gang problems. There is a connection here. Racial intolerance and gang behavior are increasing as one feeds the other. Several Orange County schools are dealing successfully with the very real problems of gangs, racial unrest and student violence. We are finding that the solution is threefold: 1. All of us must support legislators who are working on laws to suppress violent, antisocial behavior by our youth.
OPINION
April 13, 2007
Re "His popular novels blended social criticism, dark humor," obituary, April 12 Kurt Vonnegut was our generation's conscience, writing about the horrors of war and assassinations, racial unrest, destruction of the environment and the tribulations of everyday life in his own truly unique way. Whether writing about other worlds or life on Earth, he evoked wisdom and a moralistic message with the help of cynical humor, becoming a modern-day Mark...
NEWS
July 15, 2001 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After riots convulsed this city three months ago, there was much earnest talk about healing. But instead, violent crime has surged and arrests have plummeted as some police officers openly admit to slacking off on their jobs for fear that aggressive patrol work will set this tense city aflame once more. Police, who were widely blamed for triggering the riots, say they still answer every radio call, still help every citizen in need.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2000 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Salapa's ninth-graders have learned a few things in the two months they have been at Grant High School. They know Armenian American students hang out on the north side of the quad under the big trees, and the Latinos hang out on the south. They know Armenian Americans dress sort of conservative and Latinos dress sort of baggy--or at least that's what people expect. And they know what October means: fights between Armenian Americans and Latinos, who are primarily Mexican Americans at Grant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2000 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harold "the Prince" Pleasant started getting into trouble when he was 13 years old. He stole a car and served time at a county camp. By 15, he was a burglar and a drug addict. He also sold drugs to an undercover officer and was arrested twice for assaulting police. But on Thursday, Pleasant was among 25 inmates who graduated from Amer-I-can, a pilot program to quell tensions at the East Facility of Pitchess Detention Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2000 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN and BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sheriff's Department officials at the county's Pitchess Detention Center took the unusual step Thursday of segregating inmates after three days of brawling between Latino and African American inmates. Chaplains moved cell to cell, squads of jail guards patrolled the halls and many black inmates were removed from group dormitories and put in their own facility--something deputies have historically resisted doing, said Sheriff's Cmdr. Steve Day.
NEWS
January 28, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rising racial tensions and bitter labor unrest in South Africa's white-dominated police force led to police officers killing a fellow officer and wounding three others in Soweto on Friday. Heavily armed members of the Internal Security Unit used dogs and stun grenades as they stormed a barricaded police complex occupied by scores of striking black officers. Gunfire broke out moments later. A 35-year-old striking warrant officer, Jabulani Xaba, was killed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1993
The Sunday issue of Oct. 24 carried two separate but related articles; one covered the rise in racial and ethnic tension in Orange County and the other pointed out the frustrations in addressing gang problems. There is a connection here. Racial intolerance and gang behavior are increasing as one feeds the other. Several Orange County schools are dealing successfully with the very real problems of gangs, racial unrest and student violence. We are finding that the solution is threefold: 1. All of us must support legislators who are working on laws to suppress violent, antisocial behavior by our youth.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1993 | T.H. McCULLOH, T.H. McCulloh writes regularly about theater for The Times
With big cities on edge because of the latest Rodney King beating trial, maybe it's the right time to reconsider what playwright James Baldwin was saying when he wrote his play "Blues for Mr. Charlie" in the 1960s. That's what director Kenneth Beider thought when he took another look at Baldwin's drama, which was based on the 1955 Emmett Till case, in which the 14-year-old Till was slain by a white man for whistling at a white woman. The white man was acquitted.
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