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Racketeer Influenced And Corrupt Organizations Act

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1991
A federal judge on Monday dismissed part of comedienne Roseanne Barr's $35-million lawsuit against the National Enquirer for allegedly publishing her stolen love letters. U. S. District Judge Ronald Lew in Los Angeles dismissed two racketeering counts against the tabloid but left in place a conspiracy charge under the federal Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2006 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Thirty-six alleged members or associates of the Mexican Mafia were indicted Friday in a case that federal officials predicted would be the beginning of the end for the violent gang's stranglehold on some of San Diego County's Latino neighborhoods. "Any organization built on violence and drugs has to be dismantled, and today we begin that process," U.S. Atty. Carol Lam said. The charges include racketeering, drug trafficking, murder, robbery, extortion and money laundering.
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NEWS
March 5, 1998 | Associated Press
Using a class-action suit filed under the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act, the National Organization for Women asked a federal court jury Wednesday to force militant antiabortion leaders to pay for damages caused in clinic attacks. The lawsuit names as defendants two of the most militant antiabortion groups, Operation Rescue and the Pro-Life Action League, as well as three of the league's top leaders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2001 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A Los Angeles federal judge has issued more than a dozen rulings in recent days casting serious doubt on whether plaintiffs in Rampart scandal-related civil cases will be able to recover any damages against the Los Angeles Police Department under federal racketeering laws. U.S. District Judge Gary A.
NEWS
April 29, 1998 | From Reuters
A mammoth government effort to prove tourist muggers in Miami were running an organized crime syndicate ended in failure Tuesday when a federal jury failed to convict 12 defendants on any conspiracy charge. Prosecutors flew in dozens of people from Europe and South America to testify about crimes allegedly committed against them by members of the group, nicknamed "the dirty dozen," during visits to Miami in the early 1990s.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1989 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
Federal prosecutors filed a new racketeering indictment in the Princeton/Newport Partners securities fraud case, increasing the number of felony counts to 68 from 35 and adding charges that the firm's top executives engaged in illegal trading through the U.S. unit of a British investment house. The five officials of Princeton/Newport, a small securities firm with offices in Princeton, N.J., and Newport Beach, were first indicted in August.
BUSINESS
January 5, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its first use of the federal Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act, or RICO, California's recycling agency announced Friday that it has filed a $4-million civil suit against Long Beach-based State Salvage Co. The suit is "by far the largest" enforcement effort so far in the state's 3-year-old recycling program, according to Marcia J. Steinberg, chief counsel for the state Department of Conservation.
NEWS
June 15, 1993 | From Associated Press
The Supreme Court will decide whether a federal law aimed primarily at battling the Mafia may be used to sue protesters who block women's access to abortion clinics. The court said Monday that it will review a ruling that spared Operation Rescue and other anti-abortion groups from being sued by abortion clinic operators under the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act. A decision is expected sometime in 1994.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1989 | CHARISSE JONES, Times Staff Writer
A & B Loan Co., accused of racketeering in connection with financing some of Los Angeles' worst slum buildings, filed a motion Wednesday to have the lawsuit against it and more than 130 other defendants moved from Superior Court to federal court. Max Greenberg, an attorney for the Inglewood-based lending institution, and its co-owner, Alexander Spitzer, said a notice of removal was filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government, charging that organized crime has virtual control over air-freight operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, filed a civil racketeering suit Wednesday aimed at ousting the leadership of two Teamsters Union locals. "This is a problem that has been festering for years and years," U.S. Atty. Andrew J. Maloney said in announcing the suit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2001 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In a ruling that could markedly increase the city's financial exposure in the Rampart police scandal, the federal judge presiding over all Rampart-related civil suits has ruled that the Los Angeles Police Department can be sued as a racketeering enterprise.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2000 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorney Stephen Yagman offered Tuesday to drop a claim for triple damages in a federal racketeering lawsuit against Rampart police officers. In exchange, he said, the city must quit relying on a one-year statute of limitations to block lawsuits by victims in the police abuse scandal. He also demanded that the city reverse its position that only defendants whose convictions have been overturned can sue for false arrest. Yagman made his proposal in a blistering letter to City Atty. James K.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2000 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city attorney's office asked a federal judge Wednesday for permission to appeal his unprecedented ruling allowing the Los Angeles Police Department to be sued under an anti-racketeering law. A lawyer for the city told U.S. District Judge William J. Rea that his ruling "is without legal support and is contrary to the controlling authority" of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals and other federal courts.
NEWS
August 29, 2000 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A federal judge ruled Monday that the Los Angeles Police Department can be sued as a racketeering enterprise by people who claim their civil rights were violated by Rampart Division officers. The ruling, which legal experts called unprecedented, also opened the door to an injunction that would forbid officers from engaging in evidence planting and perjury.
BUSINESS
May 26, 2000 | SHARON BERNSTEIN and DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
California doctors on Thursday launched their broadest legal assault yet on managed care, accusing three of the biggest HMOs of conspiring to keep doctors' fees low, lying to doctors and patients about the quality of care members would receive, and attempting to illegally insert themselves into the doctor-patient relationship. In a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in San Francisco, the 30,000-member California Medical Assn.
NEWS
November 24, 1999 | ALISSA J. RUBIN and HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Lawyers saying they represent 32 million members of managed health care plans have launched the largest legal assault yet on HMOs, filing class-action lawsuits against five of the industry's biggest players. The suits are expected to further pound the managed health care industry on Wall Street and add to its image problems--even though it is far from clear whether the lawsuits will result in substantial damage awards or even survive initial legal tests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1995 | STEVE SCHEIBAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Members of a notorious national crime ring, who fled from two Newport Beach stores with about $8 million in gems after swift and terrifying take-over robberies, have been convicted and sentenced to prison. The seven-year, $16-million crime spree stretched from California to Florida, authorities said. The ring was known for theatrics, efficiency and the value of its loot.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1990 | LINDA WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aetna Life Insurance Co. says the $18 million that a federal judge awarded to it and two other health insurance carriers on Thursday was the largest health-care fraud judgment ever secured under the federal Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO). But Aetna acknowledged that the hard part will be getting its hands on the money.
NEWS
April 29, 1998 | From Reuters
A mammoth government effort to prove tourist muggers in Miami were running an organized crime syndicate ended in failure Tuesday when a federal jury failed to convict 12 defendants on any conspiracy charge. Prosecutors flew in dozens of people from Europe and South America to testify about crimes allegedly committed against them by members of the group, nicknamed "the dirty dozen," during visits to Miami in the early 1990s.
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