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NEWS
February 19, 1994 | PAUL JACOBS and MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Assemblyman Pat Nolan pleaded guilty in federal district court Friday to racketeering and was immediately sentenced to 33 months in prison. His sentence begins March 28. Afterward, the onetime GOP Assembly leader was unapologetic and said he had only pleaded guilty because he feared a lengthier prison sentence. "For six years I have battled (federal prosecutors)," Nolan, of Glendale, said outside the courthouse. "I'm worn out, though I think I would have convinced a jury of my innocence."
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OPINION
March 17, 2014 | By Michael Shermer
The New Jersey Motor Vehicle Commission last week voted to prohibit Tesla from selling its electric vehicles directly to consumers, a decision endorsed by the New Jersey Coalition of Automotive Retailers and Gov. Chris Christie. New Jersey is the third state, after Texas and Arizona, to block Tesla from direct sales, all under the guise of protecting consumers. Some free market. Of course, auto dealers prefer an arrangement in which they have exclusive rights to sell a certain manufacturer's product.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1991 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reputed underworld figure Robert (Fat Bobby) Paduano, accused of trying to take over the Newport Beach drug trade, pleaded guilty Monday to 43 felony counts of residential robberies, extortion, conspiracy to sell cocaine and false imprisonment. As part of an agreement with county prosecutors, Paduano was sentenced to eight years in state prison. Paduano's guilty plea came after a lively and unusual exchange between the defendant and Deputy Dist. Atty. Christopher J. Evans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2014 | By Seema Mehta and Michael Finnegan
Anti-fracking advocates repeatedly interrupted Gov. Jerry Brown's speech at the California Democratic Convention in Los Angeles on Saturday, chanting and waving signs as he gave his first major speech since declaring his intention to run for reelection. Chanting “No fracking!” and waving signs that said “Another Democrat Against  Fracking,” scores of protesters repeatedly drowned out Brown as he tried to deliver a speech arguing that California has prospered while politicians in Washington, D.C., have fiddled.
OPINION
January 31, 2002
Re "California to Number Exits on Freeways," Jan. 16: Am I the only one who noticed in the article that the freeway signs are going to be replaced over a three-year period as part of the normal sign-replacement maintenance cycle at an additional cost of $30 million? If the signs are going to be replaced anyway, why the $30-million cost? I suspect there isn't much more than a few thousand dollars worth of paint in graffiti covering nearly every exit sign and overpass on the freeway system.
NEWS
May 31, 1997 | GEORGE RAMOS and ROBERT J. LOPEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a major victory for federal prosecutors, 12 members of the Mexican Mafia were convicted Friday of racketeering and conspiracy charges, including murder and extortion carried out in a ruthless bid to extend the group's influence beyond California's prisons.
HEALTH
May 31, 2010 | Roy Wallack, Gear
Tungsten. Basalt. Giant holes. "Smart" materials that morph from hard to soft. Tennis rackets, like everything in life, seem to get stranger and techier by the minute — but do they actually make you hit the ball better? We gathered four of the hottest new upper-end models from the biggest brands in the U.S., put them in the hands of enthusiastic players, from college-age to middle-age, and headed to the courts to find out. Control freak Babolat Aero Pro Drive: The latest design from this 135-year-old French racket maker features a frame of graphite interlaced with thin threads of tough, strong tungsten and a neck molded in an "aero modular" triangular shape.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1997 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two members of the Mexican Mafia--convicted in May after a seven-month federal trial that prosecutors hailed as a serious blow against the secretive prison gang--were sentenced Tuesday to life in prison without the possibility of parole. True to the code of silence in which members deny the organization's very existence, Randy "Cowboy" Therrien, 37, of Moreno Valley, looked straight ahead and said nothing when U.S. District Judge Ronald S.W.
SPORTS
December 9, 1986 | Scott Howard-Cooper
In junior high school, Melissa Sutton's game was tennis, and it was a pretty good game at that. She played local tournaments for about four years, was ranked 29th in Southern California as a 14-year-old, and, she says, was strung tighter than her racket. "I was sort of a John McEnroe-type," she recalled. "I did get mad when I was on the tennis court, and I didn't like that. I didn't want to be like that. So I stopped playing."
NEWS
August 19, 1988 | Associated Press
Donnay SA, once the world's top maker of tennis rackets, was declared bankrupt today by a Belgian court after it failed to reach a deal with creditors to restructure its massive debt. The family-run company climbed to the top ranks of the world's tennis racket makers when Bjorn Borg advertised its products a decade ago, but the company began to suffer heavy losses after the Swedish champion retired in 1981.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2014 | By Rick Rojas
Two leaders in an Ontario street gang were convicted Monday for their part in running what authorities described as a criminal operation responsible for violent crimes and the distribution of narcotics such as meth and heroin in the city, prosecutors said. Armando "Mando" Barajas, 50, and Juan "Nito" Gil, 43, were found guilty by a jury on federal racketeering charges connected with the operation of the Black Angels gang in the San Bernardino County city, according to a statement from the U.S. attorney's office.  These were the latest in a string of nearly 60 convictions of people linked to the gang, including the gang's enforcers and drug dealers - all stemming from an indictment charging violations of the RICO, or Racketeer Influenced Corrupt Organizations, Act, prosecutors said.
NEWS
December 16, 2013 | By Trishna Patel
Oftentimes cool shots are created from the most mundane of moments. Photographer Brandon Wilson was visiting a friend at his office in Hollywood. Mid-conversation, his friend heard a noise outside and leaned out the window to see what was going on. “I thought the light looked great and decided to take a shot,” Wilson said. "Not terribly exciting, but that's what happened. "  The image was taken with a Mamiya 6 camera (75mm lens). Follow Trishna Patel on twitter.
OPINION
October 22, 2013 | Jonah Goldberg
Conservatives with long memories had to laugh at the recent New York Times front-page headline: "Fiscal Crisis Sounds the Charge in GOP's 'Civil War.'" That diagnosis largely hangs on the judgment of 1970s New Right direct-mail impresario Richard Viguerie, whose ears have been ringing with the thunder of Ft. Sumter for a quarter-century. Within a week of Ronald Reagan's 1981 inauguration, Viguerie was denouncing the Gipper as a traitor to the cause. The Associated Press ran a story headlined "Conservatives Angry With Reagan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2013 | By James Rainey
A federal judge has thrown out allegations by labor activists in Los Angeles against the leaders of their local and international union, finding that the dissidents did not have legal standing to bring racketeering and corruption allegations. U.S. District Judge Dean D. Pregerson dismissed the bulk of a lawsuit brought by 16 members of the International Union of Operating Engineers, Local 501, alleging violations of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act. The judge's ruling, issued Wednesday, gives the plaintiffs the opportunity to press other claims against the union, but is a second significant setback for the workers, who call themselves "The Resistance.
SPORTS
September 30, 2013 | By Diane Pucin
  Thanks to a YouTube video (with a hat tip to Larry Brown Sports ), we get to see how much Serena Williams wants to win, even when she plays a first-round doubles match with her sister Venus in China. Williams double-faulted on match point and that led to a classic Serena anger attack. At least this time only the racket suffered and no referees were hurt, physically or mentally, in the attack. Only a poor racket. But Venus and Serena did sweetly congratulate their vanquishers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2013 | By Jill Cowan
Eight of 70 defendants charged in a wide-reaching investigation that targeted the small but ruthless Armenian Power gang pleaded guilty this week in federal court, authorities said Wednesday. Four of the eight were allegedly "members or associates" of the organized crime syndicate, which investigators say took root in east Hollywood in the 1980s. The other four took part in Armenian Power-driven crimes, but were not actual gang members, according to a U.S. attorney's office news release.
SPORTS
January 21, 2006
Michelle Kwan should not go to the Olympics. Period. I am sorry about her injured groin, but what if Andre Agassi had said, "Hey, guys, my ankle will be fine in two weeks and I wish to play in the finals of the Australian Open." NANCY SCHOETTLER Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2013 | By James Rainey
Members of a large Los Angeles-based union local that has been torn by internal strife have reelected their leaders in a closely watched election that included accusations that the organization was beset by fraud, racketeering and intimidation tactics. Challengers said they had hoped to strike a blow against national leaders of the International Union of Operating Engineers, who the dissidents alleged had nurtured a culture of corruption. The contest, which included two competing slates of dissidents, was widely followed in labor circles.
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