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Racquelle De La Rocha

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1995 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Ethics Commission President Racquelle de la Rocha, who last month engineered the abrupt firing of the commission's founding executive director, on Wednesday snubbed a City Council committee hearing on the matter. Citing concerns that confidential personnel issues would be improperly aired, De la Rocha sent her regrets in a brief written statement delivered to Councilman Mike Feuer as he was about to convene an early morning session of the Rules and Elections Committee.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1995 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Ethics Commission President Racquelle de la Rocha, who last month engineered the abrupt firing of the commission's founding executive director, on Wednesday snubbed a City Council committee hearing on the matter. Citing concerns that confidential personnel issues would be improperly aired, De la Rocha sent her regrets in a brief written statement delivered to Councilman Mike Feuer as he was about to convene an early morning session of the Rules and Elections Committee.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1995 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Ethics Commission on Friday picked its highest-ranking deputy to lead the city's anti-corruption agency while seeking a permanent replacement for Benjamin Bycel, the founding executive director fired last month. Deputy Director Rebecca Avila, 34, was the unanimous choice of commissioners during a closed-door session that also included discussion of "anticipated litigation" over Bycel's abrupt and controversial dismissal on Oct. 20.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1995 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council is going to let stand the Ethics Commission's recent firing of founding Executive Director Benjamin Bycel, City Hall sources confirmed Tuesday. But no one expects the council's apparent unwillingness to exercise its power to overturn the firing to put an end to the 2-week-old controversy. More debate over the 3-1 vote to fire Bycel--taken without explanation during a closed-door commission session Oct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1996 | BILL BOYARSKY
Five years ago, a legal intern for the Los Angeles City Ethics Commission became suspicious while poring over campaign contribution reports. What caught Craig Steele's eye were $500 contributions from an odd assortment of givers. They listed their occupations as secretary, receptionist and such--jobs that seemingly wouldn't pay enough to warrant such big gifts. Some lived in other cities. Why would a receptionist living outside L.A. give $500 each to several Los Angeles City Council candidates?
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