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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1998
Re "Program Has Neighbors Shooting Neighbors . . . With a Radar Gun," Feb. 6. On Comrade Andy Fox's Neighborhood Speed Awareness Program supported by Marilyn Bell, I was left with one question: If Bell is so proud of her program and what she is doing, why are the names of all the operatives being kept secret? MIKE HANNIN Newbury Park
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SPORTS
July 11, 2013 | By Mike DiGiovanna
SEATTLE - Much like his surging team and the improved bullpen he has become an integral part of, Angels reliever Dane De La Rosa is gathering steam. When the well-traveled 6-foot-7, 245-pound right-hander was called up from triple-A Salt Lake in April, his fastball sat at about 92 mph. As De La Rosa gained confidence in his mechanics and array of pitches and felt a greater sense of belonging in the big leagues, his velocity increased to the 94-95-mph range. Then on June 26, with the bases loaded and two out in the fourth inning, De La Rosa blew a 98-mph fastball by Detroit's Torii Hunter for strike three, part of a two-inning stint that earned De La Rosa the win in a 7-4 Angels victory.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1997 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO
The City Council has unanimously approved a six-month trial for a program that will allow residents to borrow radar guns and monitor speeding in their neighborhoods. Under the plan, the first of its kind in Ventura County, civilians trained to use the radar guns would gauge whether cars are driving beyond the speed limit where they live. The plan was proposed by the county Sheriff's Department and city traffic engineers.
SPORTS
October 21, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin
SAN FRANCISCO -- In 2002, the Anaheim Angels unleashed “K-Rod” upon the playoffs. Francisco Rodriguez started the season in the minor leagues, dazzled in a September trial in the major leagues, and wreaked havoc upon postseason opponents as the Angels won the World Series. Ten years later, the St. Louis Cardinals present Trevor Rosenthal. He lacks the cool nickname, but he has a supersonic fastball. The Cardinals might not win the World Series, but to this point Rosenthal's statistics this fall are better than those Rodriguez put up a decade ago. Rosenthal has faced 22 batters this postseason, entering Game 6 of the National League Championship series.
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Connecticut State Police has banned the use of hand-held radar guns because of concerns that troopers could develop cancer from longterm exposure to the radiation waves the devices emit. The move, believed to be the first of its kind by a state police agency, was taken two months after three city police officers filed workers' compensation claims stating that they developed cancer from using hand-held radar guns.
NEWS
April 26, 2001
Radar guns use radio waves to measure the speed of moving objects. After emitting a pulse, the gun tracks the amount of time the radio wave takes to echo off an object and its change in frequency--also known as its Doppler shift. The gun then computes how fast the object is moving in miles per hour. * Moving at the speed of light, these electromagnetic waves are invisible to the human eye.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1997 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Next time some motorist is high-tailing it through one of this city's quiet streets, he may have a surprise in store: His neighbor may be toting a radar gun and lying in wait. Traffic officials from the Ventura County Sheriff's Department and Thousand Oaks have devised a plan--the first of its kind in the county--to allow residents to borrow radar guns and monitor speeding in their neighborhoods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1998 | TROY HEIE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An engine hums in the distance, and a pair of eyes quickly scan a digital display on the dashboard of a car parked along Northam Avenue. A radar wave hits the oncoming car and bounces back: 40 in a 25-mph zone. Busted. Sort of. The citizen-run Neighborhood Speed Awareness Program is up and running in Thousand Oaks and has caught more than a dozen violators so far, each of whom was sent a friendly warning by mail.
NEWS
December 25, 1991 | From Associated Press
The San Diego Police Department is phasing out hand-held radar guns used to detect speeding motorists because some officers believe the guns may cause cancer. Capt. Nancy Goodrich said the microwave-emitting radar devices will be phased out over the next two years in favor of new laser technology that has not been linked to any ill effects. No San Diego police officers have taken ill as a result of using the department-issued Kustom Signals Inc. radar guns, officials say.
NEWS
August 11, 1992 | Associated Press
Police officers told Congress on Monday they fear the radar guns they use to catch speeders are giving them cancer, but scientists differed on whether there is any evidence of a link. The officers complained the government isn't doing enough to warn troopers or to investigate the medical effects of microwave radiation emitted by the traffic radar guns. "Hand-held police radar guns should be restricted or banned," said Thomas Malcolm, a police officer in Windsor Locks, Conn.
SPORTS
May 18, 2012 | By Eric Sondheimer
Right-hander Luke Eubank of Newbury Park is 9-0 with a 1.08 earned-run average, six shutouts, three no-hitters and has given up only 10 walks in 65 innings. "It's the best pitching performance in the last 30 years that I've seen," Newbury Park Coach Matt Goldfield said. On Friday in his latest dominating performance, Eubank struck out six, walked none and finished with a two-hitter as the Panthers defeated Long Beach Wilson, 3-0, in a first-round Southern Section Division 1 playoff game.
SPORTS
May 7, 2012 | ERIC SONDHEIMER
To all the high school pitchers who keep winning games but get no love from the pro baseball scouts because they don't fit into the required mold (a.k.a, throw 90 mph), let me introduce you to your future hero, left-hander Daniel Starkand of Burbank High. "I'm a skinny kid," the 6-foot-4, 170-pound Starkand said. His fastball probably comes in at 83 mph on a good day. He hasn't given up an earned run in his last 46 innings. He ended Arcadia's Pacific League winning streak at 41 games by shutting down the Apaches, 3-0. He has a 4.25 grade-point average and will play for Chapman University next season.
SPORTS
March 19, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
Scott Kazmir doesn't want to continue the ratio of 11 walks in 11-plus innings, but the Angels' left-hander will keep the mechanics he displayed Saturday. Kazmir ? coming off a 9-15, 5.40-ERA season amid spring angst that he's been hovering around 85 mph on radar guns ? showed more life on his fastball and expressed satisfaction with the movement of his change-up in a 95-pitch, 41/3 -inning outing in the Angels' 10-7 loss to the Cleveland Indians before a sellout crowd of 8,735 at Diablo Stadium.
SPORTS
October 8, 2010 | By Kevin Baxter
The Cincinnati Reds watched their season come apart Friday quicker than you can say, "See you in spring training. " In the span of four batters and 11 pitches, the Reds saw a batter awarded first base even though the pitch never appeared to hit him, saw a runner called safe after he apparently missed the base and watched a sure-handed outfielder lose a line drive in the lights. By the time the seventh inning was over, the Reds had turned a one-run lead into a two-run deficit en route to a 7-4 loss to the Philadelphia Phillies in Game 2 of their National League division series, pushing them to the brink of elimination in the best-of-five series, which resumes Sunday in Cincinnati.
SPORTS
August 9, 2010 | By Dylan Hernandez
Reporting from Philadelphia — Jonathan Broxton said he has never watched the tape of his blown save in Game 4 of the National League Championship Series last year at Citizens Bank Park, where the Dodgers open a three-game series against the Philadelphia Phillies on Tuesday night. "Nope," he said. The Dodgers' closer said he not only has tried to avoid replays of his career's greatest heartbreaks, but also his crowning achievements. Other than TV highlights he has happened to see while channel surfing, he said, he has never watched images of himself closing out the 2008 NL division series or last month's All-Star game.
SPORTS
February 27, 2008 | Eric Sondheimer
Long before Gerrit Cole's junior baseball season, UCLA Coach John Savage identified the Orange Lutheran right-hander as having one of the better pitching arms in the Southland. Savage got an early commitment from Cole and started to make plans for when Cole would arrive for the 2009 college season. Then Cole began throwing 97-mph fastballs last October, enlisted Scott Boras as his draft advisor and received national attention as a possible top choice, leaving Savage to play a nervous waiting game.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1998 | VERONIQUE de TURENNE
Drivers traveling along Avenida de los Arboles between Erbes Road and Westlake Boulevard in Thousand Oaks can expect to be under the gun, according to the Ventura County Sheriff's Department. The radar gun, that is. A spate of speeding in recent weeks led to the decision to actively enforce the speed limit using radar equipment, officials said. Radar guns are in use in the area through Thursday. Drivers caught exceeding the speed limit will be cited, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1996 | DUKE HELFAND
So you've got a speeding problem in your neighborhood. Nothing seems to slow down the scofflaws, not even your screaming, as they zoom down your street. Here's how to get a radar gun for your neighborhood group. The Los Angeles Police Department's West Traffic Division is supplying free radar equipment in a new program that will allow residents to monitor speeding motorists. The strategy is simple: residents work in groups along the sides of their streets.
SPORTS
June 19, 2007 | Ross Newhan, Special to The Times
Who needs magnetic imaging when the unrelenting and omnipresent speed guns have served to track the health of Jason Schmidt's shoulder? Now back on the 15-day disabled list, the $47-million Dodgers right-hander has been under the gun so often in the first year of his three-year contract, so frequently asked about the correlation between speed and sound (as in the stability of his shoulder), that he now politely refuses to discuss it. If only he could escape it.
SPORTS
April 1, 2007 | Ben Walker, Associated Press
The little righty wearing the Bob Feller jersey squeezed the ball, cranked up and let fly with all his might. Seemed pretty pleased with his heater, until he stepped back and saw the radar reading: 29 mph. As the 9-year-old trudged away, too embarrassed to look at his dad, the man running the speed gun arcade outside the New York Mets' spring training park in Port St. Lucie, Fla., shook his head. "These kids see it on TV these days, it looks so easy," he said.
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