Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRade Markovic
IN THE NEWS

Rade Markovic

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 6, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After the fall of former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic, but while his secret police chief remained in office, vast numbers of police documents were destroyed and illegal copies of files on former opposition leaders were spirited away, Serbian Interior Minister Dusan Mihajlovic said Thursday. "The period from Oct. 5 until Jan. 25 was used for the active destruction of evidence," Mihajlovic told a session of the Serbian parliament's Defense and Security Committee.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 6, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After the fall of former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic, but while his secret police chief remained in office, vast numbers of police documents were destroyed and illegal copies of files on former opposition leaders were spirited away, Serbian Interior Minister Dusan Mihajlovic said Thursday. "The period from Oct. 5 until Jan. 25 was used for the active destruction of evidence," Mihajlovic told a session of the Serbian parliament's Defense and Security Committee.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 25, 2001 | From Associated Press
The man who served as chief of the secret police for Slobodan Milosevic was arrested, authorities said Saturday--a move that could signal that Yugoslavia's new leaders are preparing to arrest the former president. Rade Markovic's arrest was reported by the independent B-92 Radio and confirmed by police officials who spoke on condition of anonymity. It was not immediately clear what charges he faced. Markovic was fired last month when the new Serbian government was elected.
NEWS
February 25, 2001 | From Associated Press
The man who served as chief of the secret police for Slobodan Milosevic was arrested, authorities said Saturday--a move that could signal that Yugoslavia's new leaders are preparing to arrest the former president. Rade Markovic's arrest was reported by the independent B-92 Radio and confirmed by police officials who spoke on condition of anonymity. It was not immediately clear what charges he faced. Markovic was fired last month when the new Serbian government was elected.
WORLD
July 19, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
SERBIA-MONTENEGRO Former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic's paramilitary commander, his secret police chief and five others were convicted and sentenced for the 2000 murder of former Serbian President Ivan Stambolic. Former Cmdr. Milorad Lukovic was sentenced to the maximum 40 years for the murder and for an attempt to assassinate Vuk Draskovic, now Serbia and Montenegro's foreign minister. Radomir Rade Markovic, the former secret service chief, was given 15 years.
NEWS
July 7, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A Yugoslav court sentenced Rade Markovic, the feared Serbian secret police chief under Slobodan Milosevic, to one year in jail for revealing state secrets. Markovic is the first senior Milosevic ally to be convicted by a court since reformers ousted the former Yugoslav president in October. Two of Markovic's former police associates, Milan Radonjic and Branko Crni, also were sentenced to one year in jail, and a third, Nikola Curcic, received a sentence of one year and four months.
NEWS
February 26, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY and ZORAN CIRJAKOVIC, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Expectations are quickly growing here that the arrest of a deposed secret police chief will lead to the seizure of former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic. Rade Markovic, taken into custody Friday on suspicion of murder in the deaths of four aides to a former opposition leader, was head of the secret police in Serbia, Yugoslavia's dominant republic.
NEWS
January 27, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Promising that his government will hold Slobodan Milosevic accountable for past crimes, Zoran Djindjic took office as the first pro-democracy prime minister since World War II in Serbia, Yugoslavia's dominant republic. Djindjic's promise came as chief U.N. war crimes prosecutor Carla Del Ponte left Belgrade disappointed Thursday after Yugoslav leaders rejected her demand that Milosevic be tried by the Netherlands-based court rather than before domestic tribunals.
WORLD
April 25, 2003 | From Associated Press
Police have filed charges against former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic and several of his allies in the abduction and killing of a former Serbian president, officials said Thursday. Police investigating the March 12 assassination of Serbian Prime Minister Zoran Djindjic found the remains of former Serbian President Ivan Stambolic last month. Stambolic was once Milosevic's mentor, but the two politicians later became bitter rivals.
WORLD
January 31, 2003 | From Associated Press
A top intelligence official under former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic was found guilty Thursday of planning to assassinate one of Milosevic's rivals and was sentenced to seven years in prison. Two aides drew 15-year prison terms for murder. The verdicts and sentences were issued in a Belgrade court after more than seven months of proceedings against former secret service chief Radomir Rade Markovic and two of his agents, Nenad Bujosevic and Nenad Ilic.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1993 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
The year is 1954. Josip Broz Tito is the unchallenged ruler of Yugoslavia, marshal, prime minister and president all in one. Zoran is a somber and phlegmatic 10-year-old boy whose idea of a good time is eating the plaster off the walls of his Belgrade apartment. Talk about your odd couples. Zoran mimics the great man's gestures in newsreels and gets up in the middle of the night to ensure a good spot when the maximum leader parades by.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|