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Radial Keratotomy

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NEWS
March 17, 1985
While reading "Eye Surgery Pitch--Is It Hype or Hope?" (by Allan Parachini, March 3), I only found the answer to half of that question. According to Parachini's article, radial keratotomy is an unapproved procedure being hyped shamelessly to the public. Certainly, there is truth in the idea that some of the marketing pitches for RK go too far. Radial keratotomy is not for everyone who is nearsighted. Not every person undergoing the procedure will be able to "throw those glasses away."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1997 | TARA MEYER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tiny, transparent rings implanted into the cornea may be the newest hope for nearsighted adults fed up with glasses and contacts. The plastic rings, which are slightly thicker than a contact lens, would be an alternative to permanent vision correction procedures such as radial keratotomy and laser treatments. The rings are designed to be permanent but can be removed if better procedures are developed or if wearers don't like them.
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NEWS
March 3, 1985 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
The first sentence of a letter from a public relations firm representing a Beverly Hills ophthalmologist was dramatic and eye-catching enough. "There is a 20-minute procedure that 'cures' myopia (nearsightedness)," it said, and it went on to promise miracle surgery that can permit someone who is nearsighted to "throw those glasses away."
NEWS
October 13, 1994 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Radial keratotomy, the controversial surgical technique in which slits are made in the surface of the eye to eliminate the need for glasses, is both safe and effective, according to results of a 10-year study directed by USC and sponsored by the National Eye Institute. The study's findings, proponents say, may put to rest concerns over the procedure. But the results also raise questions about its long-term effects.
NEWS
August 19, 1986 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Times Staff Writer
Before Peggy Lindauer received her first pair of glasses in the third grade, she was so nearsighted she couldn't see the blackboard. She was, she recalled, "blind as a bat." In fact, the 23-year-old architectural draftsman has been so severely myopic all her life that she wouldn't go swimming in the ocean alone because she was afraid she wouldn't be able to find her way back to her beach towel without her glasses.
NEWS
October 13, 1994 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Radial keratotomy, the controversial surgical technique in which slits are made in the surface of the eye to eliminate the need for glasses, is both safe and effective, according to results of a 10-year study directed by USC and sponsored by the National Eye Institute. The study's findings, proponents say, may put to rest concerns over the procedure. But the results also raise questions about its long-term effects.
NEWS
February 23, 1990 | From the Associated Press
Two-thirds of those who had eye surgery to correct nearsightedness were able to see without glasses four years later, but doctors still cannot predict the outcome of the costly operation, a study found. "Our study and others have demonstrated fairly well that there are some adverse outcomes, but they are relatively rare," said John Carter, coordinator of the study, based at Emory University in Atlanta.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1997 | TARA MEYER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tiny, transparent rings implanted into the cornea may be the newest hope for nearsighted adults fed up with glasses and contacts. The plastic rings, which are slightly thicker than a contact lens, would be an alternative to permanent vision correction procedures such as radial keratotomy and laser treatments. The rings are designed to be permanent but can be removed if better procedures are developed or if wearers don't like them.
NEWS
February 9, 1986 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
In what many doctors see as an inevitable result of growing entrepreneurial pressures on medicine, a price war has broken out here over one of the most controversial surgeries currently in use--radial keratotomy to reduce nearsightedness. It has already provoked chuckles and raised eyebrows, as well as bringing agreement and criticism from doctors and health economists.
NEWS
March 27, 1985
Re: "You Can Go Ethnic Again" (by Beverly Beyette, March 13), as an American I would like to ask some questions and express my layman views on the article. Why? Why do ethnic groups feel the necessity to be so concerned about heritage and cultural background? Why do they insist on maintaining the same prejudices and evoking prejudice upon themselves that their ancestors migrated to this country to escape? What is so important about being ethnic? Isn't being American enough? Human relationship is what this country is all about.
NEWS
February 23, 1990 | From the Associated Press
Two-thirds of those who had eye surgery to correct nearsightedness were able to see without glasses four years later, but doctors still cannot predict the outcome of the costly operation, a study found. "Our study and others have demonstrated fairly well that there are some adverse outcomes, but they are relatively rare," said John Carter, coordinator of the study, based at Emory University in Atlanta.
NEWS
August 19, 1986 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Times Staff Writer
Before Peggy Lindauer received her first pair of glasses in the third grade, she was so nearsighted she couldn't see the blackboard. She was, she recalled, "blind as a bat." In fact, the 23-year-old architectural draftsman has been so severely myopic all her life that she wouldn't go swimming in the ocean alone because she was afraid she wouldn't be able to find her way back to her beach towel without her glasses.
NEWS
February 9, 1986 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
In what many doctors see as an inevitable result of growing entrepreneurial pressures on medicine, a price war has broken out here over one of the most controversial surgeries currently in use--radial keratotomy to reduce nearsightedness. It has already provoked chuckles and raised eyebrows, as well as bringing agreement and criticism from doctors and health economists.
NEWS
March 17, 1985
While reading "Eye Surgery Pitch--Is It Hype or Hope?" (by Allan Parachini, March 3), I only found the answer to half of that question. According to Parachini's article, radial keratotomy is an unapproved procedure being hyped shamelessly to the public. Certainly, there is truth in the idea that some of the marketing pitches for RK go too far. Radial keratotomy is not for everyone who is nearsighted. Not every person undergoing the procedure will be able to "throw those glasses away."
NEWS
March 3, 1985 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
The first sentence of a letter from a public relations firm representing a Beverly Hills ophthalmologist was dramatic and eye-catching enough. "There is a 20-minute procedure that 'cures' myopia (nearsightedness)," it said, and it went on to promise miracle surgery that can permit someone who is nearsighted to "throw those glasses away."
NEWS
June 30, 2000 | From Associated Press
In a database kept secret from patients, the government has recorded the names of nearly 500 doctors and dentists across the country who have been slapped with at least 10 disciplinary actions and malpractice payments over the last decade. One of every seven U.S. doctors and one of every eight dentists has at least one malpractice payment or disciplinary report in the National Practitioners Data Bank, which the Department of Health and Human Services has been compiling since 1990.
NEWS
December 31, 1991
In a span of about 10 years, beginning in the late 1920s, the former Russian Empire transformed itself from a backward agrarian nation to a major modern industrial power--and thus became better prepared for the Second World War. Some examples of how Soviet scientists left their mark: SCIENCE: Party ideology had devastating effects on the scientific community. Foreign scientific concepts such as Einstein's theory of relativity and quantum mechanics were labeled "bourgeois."
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