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Radiance

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
Early in his new history of humanity's embrace of nuclear energy and radiation, Craig Nelson writes about the impoverished 19-year-old Manya Sklowdowska and her lover, Casimir Zorawski, the eldest child in a wealthy Polish farming family for whom she worked as a nanny. His parents rejected the girl as below their station. The college-student son acquiesced, married someone else and went on to become a "well-regarded mathematician in Poland. " The jilted Manya became Marie Curie. The story of the star-crossed lovers and the unforeseen consequences of a single decision dovetail nicely with the sweep of our engagement with nuclear science.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
Early in his new history of humanity's embrace of nuclear energy and radiation, Craig Nelson writes about the impoverished 19-year-old Manya Sklowdowska and her lover, Casimir Zorawski, the eldest child in a wealthy Polish farming family for whom she worked as a nanny. His parents rejected the girl as below their station. The college-student son acquiesced, married someone else and went on to become a "well-regarded mathematician in Poland. " The jilted Manya became Marie Curie. The story of the star-crossed lovers and the unforeseen consequences of a single decision dovetail nicely with the sweep of our engagement with nuclear science.
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MAGAZINE
May 10, 1992
Being from beautiful San Francisco, I was appalled by McNichol's article. Granted, the homeless rate has increased. Business taxes and housing costs are obviously going to be higher in the No. 1 destination city in the world than in less illustrious cities. The aura and ominousness of the city will never die. With more nostalgia and radiance than any other major city, San Francisco stands alone above them all. SHANNON CAPRIATTI San Francisco
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
"Papa" Haydn is often called, rightfully and wrongly, the father of the symphony. The Los Angeles Philharmonic demonstrated the rightful part Thursday night with clear, crisp, clever and ever-delightful performances of Haydn's first and 100th efforts at the genre he didn't invent but unquestionably made feasible. The actual origins of the symphony are hard to pin down. A new recording by the Academy of Ancient Music in London titled "Birth of the Symphony" finds the roots of the modern symphony in the Death March from Handel's oratorio "Saul" - written in 1738, two decades before Haydn's First - and moseys through forgotten scores by Franz Xaver Richter and Johann Stamitz before arriving at Haydn.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2008 | associated press
A Raphael masterpiece that survived the collapse of a palace and centuries of decay is ready to be put back on display in Florence, Italy, after a 10-year restoration. The "Madonna of the Goldfinch" will be returned to the Uffizi gallery in Florence with the canvas strengthened and its colors restored to their original radiance, experts said Thursday. The Renaissance master painted the work in about 1505 for the wedding of his friend, a rich Florence merchant named Lorenzo Nasi.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Legend has it that Juan Ponce de León set off for the New World in search of the Fountain of Youth. Five hundred years later, Barbara Cook, the ageless 85-year-old singer, can be credited with having found it - not in some secret Florida spring, but in the American songbook. On Wednesday, Cook brought her rejuvenating magic to Walt Disney Concert Hall in a program with the Los Angeles Philharmonic that she characterized as "schizophrenic" and "eclectic. " But "enchanting" would be a more accurate description of a bill that blended musical theater standards with swing and allowed this Broadway baby to reconnect with her Southern roots.
NEWS
March 20, 1986 | AL MARTINEZ
I stood at this very place last October on a trail that looked toward the ocean, when the trees were black and the earth still smoking. Fire of awful intensity had burned through the Santa Monica Mountains, and one could not avoid the impression that the whole world had died in flames, and nothing would ever grow again where the soil itself still smoldered. But I had forgotten the strengths of life that lie in the land.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Music Critic
It may take a while for Mary Magdalene to catch up in song with the Mary music history knows so much better. But thus far, this has been the year of the other Mary. The Los Angeles Philharmonic mounted a production of John Adams' “The Gospel According to the Other Mary” at the Walt Disney Concert Hall. San Francisco Opera premiered Mark Adamo's “The Gospel of Mary Magdalene.” Along with those West Coast Mary Magdalenes, Libby Larsen's “The Magdalene” for soprano and piano had its premiere in Texas, and Friday night it came our way. Written for soprano and piano, it opened a  SongFest program devoted mostly to Larsen at the Colburn School's Zipper Hall.
TRAVEL
January 19, 1986 | JERRY HULSE, Times Travel Editor
We must go on hoping that in some other life we'll see a better thing than this. --Vincent van Gogh "Nature here is so extraordinarily beautiful. . .everywhere the sky is a marvelous blue, and the sun sheds a radiance of pale sulphur that is soft and lovely. What a country!"--Vincent Van Gogh No one who retraces the final years of Vincent van Gogh can help but be moved by the tragedy of the tortured artist's life.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2000
The Irvine medical products company lost $1.9 million, or 17 cents a share, for the third quarter, compared with a net loss of $1.3 million, or 12 cents a share, for the comparable period in 1999. Revenue was up 27% to $1.9 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Music Critic
It may take a while for Mary Magdalene to catch up in song with the Mary music history knows so much better. But thus far, this has been the year of the other Mary. The Los Angeles Philharmonic mounted a production of John Adams' “The Gospel According to the Other Mary” at the Walt Disney Concert Hall. San Francisco Opera premiered Mark Adamo's “The Gospel of Mary Magdalene.” Along with those West Coast Mary Magdalenes, Libby Larsen's “The Magdalene” for soprano and piano had its premiere in Texas, and Friday night it came our way. Written for soprano and piano, it opened a  SongFest program devoted mostly to Larsen at the Colburn School's Zipper Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Among the exceptional accomplishments of Mieczyslaw Horszowski, the Polish pianist who died in Philadelphia in 1993 one month before his 101st birthday, was marrying at 89, performing into his late 90s and teaching until the last week of his life. His students include such probing pianists as Murray Perahia, Richard Goode and Peter Serkin. In those final recitals, a revelatory Horszowski summoned, with fingers that preserved an incomparable historical memory, long-dead voices from another era. The Horszowski Trio, which made its Los Angeles debut Friday night at the gilded Doheny Mansion at Mount St. Mary's College to close the Da Camera Society season, has thus chosen surprising footsteps to follow.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Legend has it that Juan Ponce de León set off for the New World in search of the Fountain of Youth. Five hundred years later, Barbara Cook, the ageless 85-year-old singer, can be credited with having found it - not in some secret Florida spring, but in the American songbook. On Wednesday, Cook brought her rejuvenating magic to Walt Disney Concert Hall in a program with the Los Angeles Philharmonic that she characterized as "schizophrenic" and "eclectic. " But "enchanting" would be a more accurate description of a bill that blended musical theater standards with swing and allowed this Broadway baby to reconnect with her Southern roots.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2010 | By Sonja Bolle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In young-adult fiction, look for the fall to squeeze every last drop of — excuse the expression — blood out of the vampire and supernatural creature trend. We've seen werewolves, ghosts, warrior fairies, zombies … where can we go next? Well, into younger age groups, for one. With her new novel "Radiance" (Square Fish/Feiwel and Friends, ages 9-12), for example, Alyson Noël spins off a new series about the ghostly younger sister from her "Immortals" books for ages 12 and older.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds
Apparitions & Late Fictions A Novella and Stories Thomas Lynch W.W. Norton: 216 pp., $24.95 "Stuffing the open cranium with cotton, fitting the skullcap back in place and easing the scalp back over the skull, thereby restoring the facial contours, and minding the tiny stitches from behind one ear to behind another was only part of the process of embalming. . . ." In the world of Thomas Lynch, time stands still for particulars like these, unhampered by context or meaning.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2008 | associated press
A Raphael masterpiece that survived the collapse of a palace and centuries of decay is ready to be put back on display in Florence, Italy, after a 10-year restoration. The "Madonna of the Goldfinch" will be returned to the Uffizi gallery in Florence with the canvas strengthened and its colors restored to their original radiance, experts said Thursday. The Renaissance master painted the work in about 1505 for the wedding of his friend, a rich Florence merchant named Lorenzo Nasi.
MAGAZINE
March 20, 2005 | Rebecca Helm-Ropelato, Rebecca Helm-Ropelato is a freelance writer living in Lariano, Italy.
During the almost three decades I called Los Angeles home, I became accustomed, as Angelenos do when traveling, to the lame jokes about earthquakes and California crazies, the raised eyebrows from those who regard L.A. as an X-rated phantasm, and to the look of awe at times in the eyes of some dreamers, young and old, longing to explore the city's legendary myth. Revealing where I was from always evoked reaction. Since I have moved away, it has been the same.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2005 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
"Lackawanna Blues," which premieres Saturday night on HBO, brings Ruben Santiago-Hudson's autobiographical one-man show to the small screen, and it is a work less than the sum of its parts. "The Odd Couple" and "The Sound of Music" notwithstanding, not all works for the theater are effectively transferable to other mediums, and we have met one here.
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