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Radiation Contamination

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NEWS
August 12, 1990 | From United Press International
A survey of radiation contamination in the Soviet Union's second-largest city of Leningrad found 150,000 spots where levels were above normal, and a newspaper complained Saturday that officials were slow in telling residents of the danger. In a report on the Leningrad contamination, the newspaper Komsomolskaya Pravda said the most hazardous areas were initially roped off with signs that said "radioactive," but later the ropes were removed.
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WORLD
March 25, 2011 | By Julie Makinen, Los Angeles Times
As Japan marked two weeks since the giant earthquake and tsunami, the number of people dead or missing grew to more than 27,000, with at least 200,000 others in shelters and radioactivity from a stricken nuclear plant continuing to cast a pall over daily life. Two workers at the hobbled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear facility were hospitalized for radiation exposure Thursday after stepping into contaminated water during repair operations at reactor No. 3, officials at the nation's nuclear safety agency said.
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NEWS
October 4, 1991 | Associated Press
Two government committees have criticized plans to resume operations in a laboratory at the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant, saying workers could be exposed to plutonium contamination. The laboratory, known as Building 559, was to have been the model for restarting plutonium operations at the rest of the plant 15 miles northwest of Denver. The lab analyzes radioactive and hazardous waste for disposal, and performs quality control tests on plutonium samples from bomb production lines.
WORLD
March 20, 2011 | By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
Fears about the safety of the Japanese food supply grew Sunday as authorities restricted some produce shipments and advised a town near a damaged nuclear plant not to drink tap water because of radioactive elements in its supply. The Health Ministry said that radioactive iodine three times the normal level was detected in Iitate, a town of about 6,000 people 19 miles northwest of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, the Associated Press reported. That is one-twenty-sixth of the level of a chest X-ray and poses no danger to humans, a ministry official told the AP. The warning came as authorities barred shipments of raw milk from the area and the sale of spinach from neighboring Ibaraki prefecture, news reports said.
WORLD
March 20, 2011 | By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
Fears about the safety of the Japanese food supply grew Sunday as authorities restricted some produce shipments and advised a town near a damaged nuclear plant not to drink tap water because of radioactive elements in its supply. The Health Ministry said that radioactive iodine three times the normal level was detected in Iitate, a town of about 6,000 people 19 miles northwest of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, the Associated Press reported. That is one-twenty-sixth of the level of a chest X-ray and poses no danger to humans, a ministry official told the AP. The warning came as authorities barred shipments of raw milk from the area and the sale of spinach from neighboring Ibaraki prefecture, news reports said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1989 | TRACEY KAPLAN, Times Staff Writer
At Rockwell International's Santa Susana Field Laboratory west of Chatsworth, some of the nation's most sophisticated scientific research takes place in a ranch-like setting where workers use Geiger counters to measure radiation and sticks to scare off rattlesnakes. Monday, in response to a controversy over the site's environmental safety, reporters carrying radiation measurement instruments were given a three-hour tour of a portion of the 2,668-acre complex where nuclear research was conducted for nearly 40 years.
SCIENCE
March 24, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Two workers at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant were hospitalized for radiation exposure Thursday after they stepped into radioactively contaminated water while laying electrical cables in the basement of the building housing reactor No. 3. Previous exposures to radiation have been through airborne contact or direct exposure to X-rays and gamma rays being emitted from the reactor facilities. Water seeped into the boots of the two workers, coming into contact with their skin.
NEWS
February 9, 1988
The government has ordered inspections of products from more than a dozen plants because of possible radiation contamination by polonium leaks from devices used to remove static in thousands of production processes, officials said. Investigations are under way or have been completed at several Coca Cola plants, Anheuser-Busch breweries in St. Louis and Jacksonville, Fla.
NEWS
June 20, 1986
Farming has resumed on land near the crippled Chernobyl nuclear plant, but the agricultural teams will be rotated every 10 days, the Soviet news agency Tass said in an indication of lingering concerns about radiation contamination. The resumption of agriculture in the evacuated zone around the Chernobyl plant, where an April 26 nuclear accident has so far resulted in 26 deaths, came as the Supreme Soviet, approved plans to double nuclear power output by 1990.
NEWS
May 8, 1989 | From Associated Press
Passengers and crew on a Mexicana Airlines plane that had been carrying leaking packages of a radioactive chemical showed no sign of radiation contamination, officials said Sunday. An undetermined amount of molypentachloride, a corrosive that emits low-level beta radiation, was found in the cargo hold after the packages, put on the plane in Chicago, were unloaded Saturday in Mexico City. The plane had already left for Philadelphia when the leak was discovered, and officials notified Philadelphia police of the contamination.
NEWS
October 4, 1991 | Associated Press
Two government committees have criticized plans to resume operations in a laboratory at the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant, saying workers could be exposed to plutonium contamination. The laboratory, known as Building 559, was to have been the model for restarting plutonium operations at the rest of the plant 15 miles northwest of Denver. The lab analyzes radioactive and hazardous waste for disposal, and performs quality control tests on plutonium samples from bomb production lines.
NEWS
August 12, 1990 | From United Press International
A survey of radiation contamination in the Soviet Union's second-largest city of Leningrad found 150,000 spots where levels were above normal, and a newspaper complained Saturday that officials were slow in telling residents of the danger. In a report on the Leningrad contamination, the newspaper Komsomolskaya Pravda said the most hazardous areas were initially roped off with signs that said "radioactive," but later the ropes were removed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1989 | TRACEY KAPLAN, Times Staff Writer
At Rockwell International's Santa Susana Field Laboratory west of Chatsworth, some of the nation's most sophisticated scientific research takes place in a ranch-like setting where workers use Geiger counters to measure radiation and sticks to scare off rattlesnakes. Monday, in response to a controversy over the site's environmental safety, reporters carrying radiation measurement instruments were given a three-hour tour of a portion of the 2,668-acre complex where nuclear research was conducted for nearly 40 years.
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