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Radiation Leak

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NEWS
March 6, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Operators of Three Mile Island's nuclear power plant ordered a shutdown of Unit No. 1 this morning because of a radiation leak. Ralph DeSantis, a spokesman for GPU Nuclear Corp., which operates the plant, said the leak is "minimal." It was picked up by a monitor at the plant and was not detectable off-site above normal background radiation levels, he said. DeSantis said the leak does not pose a threat to the public.
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BUSINESS
June 25, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
For the first time since Japan's nuclear disaster last year, seafood caught off the Fukushima coastline is being sold in local markets to test customer demand. On Monday, two types of octopus and one variety of marine snail deemed clear of radioactive cesium were on sale, often at deep discounts, according to the Fukushima Prefecture fishing cooperative. Contamination worries still persist concerning fish, which aren't yet ready for consumption, according to Japanese media reports.
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NEWS
December 20, 1989 | Associated Press
Energy Department officials Tuesday blamed a weapons laboratory and a Nevada Test Site contractor for a delay in reporting a minor radiation leak to state officials. Nevada Gov. Bob Miller blasted the federal agency for not notifying the state earlier of the leak. But Department of Energy spokesman Chris West said the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co. waited two days before notifying the agency about the seepage that began Saturday morning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2012 | By Esmeralda Bermudez, Los Angeles Times
The San Onofre nuclear power plant came under renewed scrutiny last week after a small radiation leak and the discovery of extensive tube damage. The leak and the tube wear "at no point posed a danger to the community or to workers on site," said Jennifer Manfre, spokeswoman with Southern California Edison, which operates the facility. But the incidents raised concern among environmental groups, which for years have kept a close eye on the plant near San Clemente following other safety problems.
NEWS
June 27, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union said Monday that, despite a pipe that burst in the reactor of one of its nuclear-powered submarines and an apparent fire that followed, there has been no radiation leakage from the vessel in the Norwegian Sea and no casualties. Gen. Dmitri T. Yazov, the Soviet defense minister, told the government newspaper Izvestia that the pressure seals around the submarine's main power plant had also been broken when the high-pressure pipe burst during a dive. But Yazov said that the vessel's captain had managed to bring the damaged submarine to the surface quickly and shut down the nuclear power plant, which has twin reactors, without any radiation leakage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2012 | By Esmeralda Bermudez, Los Angeles Times
The San Onofre nuclear power plant came under renewed scrutiny last week after a small radiation leak and the discovery of extensive tube damage. The leak and the tube wear "at no point posed a danger to the community or to workers on site," said Jennifer Manfre, spokeswoman with Southern California Edison, which operates the facility. But the incidents raised concern among environmental groups, which for years have kept a close eye on the plant near San Clemente following other safety problems.
NEWS
June 28, 1989 | From Associated Press
A leak in the nuclear power system of a Soviet submarine probably contaminated the vessel but not the environment outside, a Norwegian expert said Tuesday. The submarine, built in the 1960s, billowed smoke and steam when its reactor's cooling system broke down Monday, 70 miles from the coast of Norway. Soviet officials say there was no radiation leak. They say the reactor was shut down and no one was injured. But Knut Gussgard, acting chairman of Norway's Committee on Peacetime Nuclear Accidents, said pieced-together details of the accident aboard the submarine show a reactor cooling circuit most likely leaked radioactive water and steam into the vessel.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
For the first time since Japan's nuclear disaster last year, seafood caught off the Fukushima coastline is being sold in local markets to test customer demand. On Monday, two types of octopus and one variety of marine snail deemed clear of radioactive cesium were on sale, often at deep discounts, according to the Fukushima Prefecture fishing cooperative. Contamination worries still persist concerning fish, which aren't yet ready for consumption, according to Japanese media reports.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2011 | By Jack Dolan and Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
The federal government's radiation alert network in California is not fully functional, leaving the stretch of coast between Los Angeles and San Francisco without the crucial real-time warning system in the event of a nuclear emergency. Six of the Environmental Protection Agency's 12 California sensors ? including the three closest to the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant near San Luis Obispo ? are sending data with "anomalies" to the agency's laboratory in Montgomery, Ala., said Mike Bandrowski, manager of the EPA's radiation program.
NEWS
May 8, 1986 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet government said Wednesday that radiation levels more than 19 miles around the damaged Chernobyl reactor have risen above normal but pose no threat to public health. The Council of Ministers said in a statement that the higher radioactivity occurred only in areas "directly adjoining" the danger zone--the area within a 19-mile radius of the plant. Most of the people in the zone were evacuated a week ago Sunday as a precautionary measure.
NEWS
December 27, 2011 | John Glionna, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
REPORTING FROM SEOUL -- Japan's response to the crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant was flawed by poor communication and delays in releasing data on dangerous radiation leaks at the facility, which was struck by an earthquake-triggered tsunami on March 11, a government-appointed investigative panel has found. The report attaches blame to both Japan's central government as well as the utility that operates the plant -- the Tokyo Electric Power Co. -- depicting a scene of harried officials incapable of making decisions to stem radiation leaks as the situation at the coastal plant worsened in the days and weeks following the disaster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2011 | By Jack Dolan and Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
The federal government's radiation alert network in California is not fully functional, leaving the stretch of coast between Los Angeles and San Francisco without the crucial real-time warning system in the event of a nuclear emergency. Six of the Environmental Protection Agency's 12 California sensors ? including the three closest to the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant near San Luis Obispo ? are sending data with "anomalies" to the agency's laboratory in Montgomery, Ala., said Mike Bandrowski, manager of the EPA's radiation program.
WORLD
March 21, 2011 | By Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
Concern over food contaminated by radiation from areas surrounding the troubled nuclear plant in Fukushima spread beyond Japan's borders Monday morning with world health officials warning of the potential dangers posed by the tainted food and one Japanese restaurant in Taiwan serving up radiation gauges alongside its meals. World Health Organization officials told reporters Monday that Japan should act quickly to ban food sales from areas around the damaged nuclear plant, saying radiation in food is more dangerous than radioactive particles in the air because of accumulation in the human body.
WORLD
March 20, 2011 | By John M. Glionna and Don Lee, Los Angeles Times
Marco Gutierrez was taking no chances. With radiation still leaking this weekend from the damaged Fukushima nuclear plant 150 miles away, the Tokyo resident joined the legions of foreigners — and a growing number of Japanese — fleeing the world's most populated city. "I have friends of friends who work for TEPCO, the power company [that operates Fukushima], and they all said that the worst of the radiation exposure was going to take place over the next two days," said Gutierrez, a 26-year-old consultant from Seattle, as he jostled among the crowds at Tokyo's Haneda Airport on Saturday for a flight to the southern island of Okinawa, one of the farthest points in Japan from the crippled reactors.
WORLD
March 15, 2011 | By Laura King, Ralph Vartabedian and Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
? Dangerous levels of radiation escaped a quake-stricken nuclear power plant after one reactor's steel containment structure was apparently breached by an explosion, and a different reactor building in the same complex caught fire after another explosion, Japan's leaders told a frightened population. Authorities warned that people within 20 miles of the crippled reactors should stay indoors to avoid being sickened by radiation. FOR THE RECORD: An earlier version of this story incorrectly spelled the first name of Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan as Naoko.
WORLD
March 12, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Barbara Demick and Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
A day after responding to one of the worst earthquakes on record and a massive tsunami, the Japanese government sought to allay fears of a radioactive disaster at a nuclear power plant on the country's battered northeastern coast. The outer walls of the Fukushima power plant's No. 1 reactor were blown off by a hydrogen explosion Saturday, leaving only a skeletal frame. Officials said four workers at the site received non-life-threatening injuries. The inner container holding the reactor's fuel rods is not believed to be damaged, said Japan's Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano, and workers were cooling the facilities with seawater.
NEWS
February 22, 2009 | Eric Talmadge, Talmadge writes for the Associated Press.
As Masahiko Goto sees it, the U.S. aircraft carrier George Washington is not a ship. It's a floating nuclear disaster waiting to happen near one of the world's biggest cities. Its recent deployment to a port near Tokyo was welcomed by brass bands, an open-house crowd of 30,000 and promises of greater security for Japan and the region. But to opponents here, it all boils down to two nuclear reactors and one big question: Are they safe? "It is unthinkable that we have reactors floating in the bay," said Goto, a lawyer who is leading an effort to have the ship banned from Japan.
NEWS
October 31, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Radiation from the largest underground test in U.S. nuclear history has reached the surface of an Alaskan island, Greenpeace said, and Energy Department officials want to have a look at the environmental group's evidence. Department officials met in Washington with Greenpeace researchers and said they would analyze samples gathered last summer on the Aleutian island of Amchitka. At issue is a 1971 test that the Nixon administration said was needed for research on an antiballistic missile
NEWS
February 22, 2009 | Eric Talmadge, Talmadge writes for the Associated Press.
As Masahiko Goto sees it, the U.S. aircraft carrier George Washington is not a ship. It's a floating nuclear disaster waiting to happen near one of the world's biggest cities. Its recent deployment to a port near Tokyo was welcomed by brass bands, an open-house crowd of 30,000 and promises of greater security for Japan and the region. But to opponents here, it all boils down to two nuclear reactors and one big question: Are they safe? "It is unthinkable that we have reactors floating in the bay," said Goto, a lawyer who is leading an effort to have the ship banned from Japan.
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