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Radiation Poisoning

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NEWS
October 24, 1987 | Associated Press
A 6-year-old girl and her aunt died of radiation poisoning Friday, the first fatalities in a nuclear incident last month that has contaminated at least 243 people, Brazilian officials said. Leide Das Neves Ferreira and her 37-year-old aunt, Maria Gabriela Ferreira, died of "septicemia and generalized infection" at the Marcilio Dias navy hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Dr. Jose Maria Sampaio said by telephone.
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BUSINESS
March 23, 2011 | Michael Hiltzik
To all those who may be concerned that the catastrophic events at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant will derail the heralded renaissance of nuclear power in the U.S., you can relax. The reason is simple: There is no renaissance. Not even Exelon Corp., the nation's biggest nuclear generation company, has been holding its breath for a surge in orders or appreciable increase in new generating capacity. The reason has little to do with an unreasoning public's fear of nuclear meltdowns and radiation poisoning, and almost everything to do with pure economics.
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NEWS
July 18, 1995 | BRIAN MOOAR, THE WASHINGTON POST
Federal authorities are investigating two apparent acts of radioactive sabotage in which a pregnant scientist and 25 co-workers unwittingly consumed contaminated food and water at the National Institutes of Health, officials said Monday. Officials at the NIH campus in Bethesda, Md., said they found traces of a radioactive phosphorus isotope near a lunchroom refrigerator and in a nearby water cooler. The isotope is used in tests performed at the laboratory.
WORLD
March 18, 2011 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
China tried to quell panic buying of iodized salt Thursday after grocery stores across the country were emptied of the seasoning by hordes of people hoping to ward off radiation poisoning after the nuclear accidents in Japan. The clamor for salt reportedly started after rumors spread, possibly by cellphone text messaging, that China would be hit by a radioactive cloud from Japan's Fukushima No. 1 (Daiichi) nuclear plant, which had been badly damaged during last week's earthquake and tsunami.
NEWS
October 9, 1987 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Six-year-old Leide Ferreira, severely burned by radioactive material from an abandoned cancer therapy machine, is not expected to live. She is one of 34 victims of a radiation accident that Brazilian authorities say was the worst of its kind anywhere. Brazil has requested the help of foreign specialists to help treat the victims and to participate in cleanup efforts. Experts have begun arriving from West Germany, the Soviet Union, the United States and other countries.
NEWS
January 3, 1994 | MATT BIVENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After that nightmare voyage 33 years ago, Ivan Kolokov stopped shaving. The skin on his face kept peeling off with the razor. Nikolai Zateyev, his shipmate, lay in bed 18 months while doctors replaced his bone marrow and blood. Both sailors consider themselves lucky when they remember Boris Korchilov. Korchilov was a blue-eyed, 20-year-old ladies' man. Before the voyage he was playing volleyball and flirting.
WORLD
November 29, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
An Italian security expert who met with a former KGB agent the day the ex-spy fell ill with radiation poisoning said he was under British protection and would be tested for contamination. Mario Scaramella has said that he met Alexander Litvinenko at a London sushi restaurant Nov. 1, the day Litvinenko became sick. He died Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2008 | Susan King
As he lay dying in London's University College Hospital in November 2006, exiled former KGB and FSB agent Alexander "Sasha" Litvinenko was being filmed by documentarian Andrei Nekrasov. He told Nekrasov: "If anything should happen to me, I beg you to show this tape to the whole world." Nekrasov kept the promise he made to his friend, who died three weeks after falling ill from what was later discovered to be radiation poisoning from a lethal dose of Polonium-210 in his tea, believed to have been slipped in during a meeting with two of his former FSB (Russia's modern-day secret police)
HEALTH
March 12, 2007 | Marc Siegel, Special to The Times
"Law & Order: Criminal Intent," NBC, Feb. 27, 9 p.m., "30." The premise: After journalist Josh Lemle (Lee Tergesen) develops weakness and coughs up blood, he goes to the hospital where doctors discover he has been poisoned by polonium-210, a radioactive material. They predict he will die within a week. Josh contacts the crime-solving Major Case Squad and his old friend, Det. Mike Logan (Chris Noth).
NEWS
November 8, 1987 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Like many people in Goiania, Lurdes Ferreira still has only a vague notion of what atomic radiation is, but she has learned how dangerous it can be. Radiation poisoning put Ferreira in a state shelter, sent her husband to the hospital and killed their 6-year-old daughter. An unschooled woman of 35, plump and wide-eyed, Ferreira admitted last week that she does not understand how a mysterious blue powder called cesium 137 could have inflicted so much harm on her family.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2008 | Susan King
As he lay dying in London's University College Hospital in November 2006, exiled former KGB and FSB agent Alexander "Sasha" Litvinenko was being filmed by documentarian Andrei Nekrasov. He told Nekrasov: "If anything should happen to me, I beg you to show this tape to the whole world." Nekrasov kept the promise he made to his friend, who died three weeks after falling ill from what was later discovered to be radiation poisoning from a lethal dose of Polonium-210 in his tea, believed to have been slipped in during a meeting with two of his former FSB (Russia's modern-day secret police)
HEALTH
March 12, 2007 | Marc Siegel, Special to The Times
"Law & Order: Criminal Intent," NBC, Feb. 27, 9 p.m., "30." The premise: After journalist Josh Lemle (Lee Tergesen) develops weakness and coughs up blood, he goes to the hospital where doctors discover he has been poisoned by polonium-210, a radioactive material. They predict he will die within a week. Josh contacts the crime-solving Major Case Squad and his old friend, Det. Mike Logan (Chris Noth).
WORLD
December 8, 2006 | David Holley and Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writers
Alexander Litvinenko, the former KGB agent at the center of an international poisoning mystery, was buried here Thursday, his body still so radioactive that health officials wouldn't let it be displayed at a memorial service.
WORLD
December 2, 2006 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
An Italian KGB expert who had warned poisoned Russian dissident Alexander Litvinenko that his life might be in danger has a "significant quantity" of radioactive polonium-210 in his body, authorities said Friday. British health officials also said they had detected a small quantity in a close relative of Litvinenko. Neither has shown signs of illness.
WORLD
November 29, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
An Italian security expert who met with a former KGB agent the day the ex-spy fell ill with radiation poisoning said he was under British protection and would be tested for contamination. Mario Scaramella has said that he met Alexander Litvinenko at a London sushi restaurant Nov. 1, the day Litvinenko became sick. He died Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2003 | Christine Hanley, Times Staff Writer
State health officials have decided to more than triple the number of potassium iodide pills they distribute in communities around California's two nuclear power plants. The decision comes after health experts and residents near the San Onofre and Diablo Canyon nuclear generation stations expressed concern that there might not be enough of the medication for the people who live, work, attend school and vacation in those areas.
WORLD
December 8, 2006 | David Holley and Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writers
Alexander Litvinenko, the former KGB agent at the center of an international poisoning mystery, was buried here Thursday, his body still so radioactive that health officials wouldn't let it be displayed at a memorial service.
WORLD
December 2, 2006 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
An Italian KGB expert who had warned poisoned Russian dissident Alexander Litvinenko that his life might be in danger has a "significant quantity" of radioactive polonium-210 in his body, authorities said Friday. British health officials also said they had detected a small quantity in a close relative of Litvinenko. Neither has shown signs of illness.
NEWS
April 19, 2001 | From Associated Press
Labor Secretary Elaine Chao confirmed that her agency will oversee a new compensation program for sick Cold War-era nuclear weapon workers but said Wednesday that it will not meet a congressional deadline to accept applications. Chao had wanted to shift control of the program to the Justice Department, which she said was better suited to oversee it.
NEWS
January 17, 2001 | From Reuters
NATO said Tuesday that data from its 19 member states show no link between depleted uranium munitions and "Balkan syndrome" cancers, but the alliance's assurances failed to calm an international uproar. Yugoslav President Vojislav Kostunica accused NATO of having a "depleted conscience" for using the shells and bullets during the 1999 Kosovo conflict.
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