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Radiation Therapy

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NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
These days, thanks to advances in treatment and detection, millions of women survive breast cancer.   But surviving the disease doesn't necessarily mean the entire battle is over, a population-based study of breast cancer survivors in Sweden and Denmark, published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine , seems to suggest. Assessing a total of 2,168 women whose breast cancer was treated with radiation therapy between 1958 and 2001, a team of researchers found that women's chances of having a major coronary event - a heart attack, bypass surgery or heart disease death - rose in proportion with the radiation dose they received, even at the lower doses of radiation delivered in newer treatments.
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SPORTS
April 2, 2014 | By Houston Mitchell
Hall of Fame quarterback Jim Kelly, who is currently fighting cancer, had his radiation therapy this week postponed because he has a fever, Tim Graham of the Buffalo News is reporting . Kelly has microscopic tumors on the infraorbital nerve, which runs from the upper lip to the eyelids. Kelly's treatments have been moved to Monday. He is scheduled for a seven-week program. “They have his pain pretty much under control,” Dan Kelly, Jim's brother, told the Buffalo News.
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NEWS
June 27, 1988 | United Press International
Supervisor Kenneth Hahn, who underwent prostate surgery last week, has cancerous tissue and will undergo radiation therapy, his doctors said today. Dr. George Yamauchi, a urologist, and Dr. Michael Perlman, Hahn's personal physician, said in a prepared statement that Hahn would be treated on an outpatient basis and that "his prognosis is excellent." The radiation therapy is scheduled to begin sometime in the next month.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer
All the amenities of modern medicine are available at a new West Los Angeles hospital. There's 24-hour emergency care, a team of surgeons, psychology and physical therapy units, MRI and CT machines, one of the top oncologists in the country. Medical assistants busily roam the halls, soothing patients' fears with smiles, kind words or gentle touches. But they have to watch out: The patients can bite. They're dogs, cats and other pets being treated at the VCA West Los Angeles Animal Hospital, which at 42,000 square feet is the largest pet hospital west of the Mississippi River.
SPORTS
May 12, 1988 | From Reuters
Former Wimbledon and U.S. Open tennis champion Bobby Riggs has nearly finished seven weeks of radiation therapy for prostate cancer, Stanford University Hospital said Wednesday. Riggs, 70, in a statement issued by the hospital, said it would be some time before doctors knew how the treatments had affected the disease. "We think I'm cured," Riggs said. Riggs said he felt well enough to play a round of golf on the Stanford Golf Course before returning home to San Diego.
NEWS
November 10, 1992 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Men whose prostate cancers are treated early with radiation therapy can expect to live almost as long as men the same age who never develop the disease, according to results of a 15-year study released Monday. "The bottom line . . . is that there are substantial numbers of patients who, after 15 years, are cured of the disease by radiation therapy alone," said Gerald Hanks, author of the study and chairman of the Department of Radiation Oncology at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia.
HEALTH
July 17, 2000 | RICK CALLAHAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When doctors diagnosed Billy Stamm with lung cancer, there was more bad news to come. Not only was surgery out of the question, the odds weren't good that he would respond to conventional radiation therapy. Stamm's frail lungs were so ravaged by years of emphysema, bronchitis and a two-pack-a-day cigarette habit that radiation therapy to kill the tumor also would have injured healthy tissue. But the service station worker wasn't without hope.
NEWS
May 3, 1987 | MARGARET BAUMAN, Associated Press
Zak the cat protested mildly at first, but Dr. Ann Brandenburg-Schroeder continued to rub more cornstarch and cornmeal into the cat's gray and white fur to absorb the oil that coated the feline. It was 2 a.m., and Brandenburg-Schroeder, an emergency care veterinarian, worked steadily until she was relieved by technician Betsy Sylvester, who held, scrubbed and talked to Zak.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1999
Many women with the form of breast cancer known as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a cancer of the milk glands, are unnecessarily receiving expensive and debilitating radiation therapy, according to Dr. Melvin J. Silverstein of the USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center. Until 1980, DCIS was rare, but it now accounts for as much as 40% of breast cancer cases. Normal treatment is surgical removal of the tumor followed by radiation. Silverstein and his colleagues studied 469 women with DCIS.
NEWS
January 9, 1991 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.), suffering from advanced prostate cancer and scheduled for surgery later this month, indicated Tuesday he will not testify at Senate Ethics Committee hearings into the "Keating Five" affair. Five weeks of radiation therapy have weakened and tired the senator, and he needs to rest before the surgery, Cranston's attorney, William W. Taylor III, told the committee Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman
Fans of Roger Ebert expressed shock Thursday afternoon after the film critic passed away just days after announcing he was seeking treatment for a recurrence of cancer. "Roger, I hope you're in an infinite movie palace, watching every film the great directors only dreamed of making,"  wrote  comedian Patton Oswalt on Twitter moments after news of the 70-year-old's death broke. "By the way, Death's about to get a SUPER [crappy] review. " On his website Tuesday evening, Ebert said he was receiving radiation therapy to treat a hip fracture that had turned out to be cancerous.
NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
These days, thanks to advances in treatment and detection, millions of women survive breast cancer.   But surviving the disease doesn't necessarily mean the entire battle is over, a population-based study of breast cancer survivors in Sweden and Denmark, published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine , seems to suggest. Assessing a total of 2,168 women whose breast cancer was treated with radiation therapy between 1958 and 2001, a team of researchers found that women's chances of having a major coronary event - a heart attack, bypass surgery or heart disease death - rose in proportion with the radiation dose they received, even at the lower doses of radiation delivered in newer treatments.
NEWS
December 12, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel
Gov. Jerry Brown is undergoing treatment for localized prostate cancer, according to a statement released by the governor's office. In it, Brown's UC San Francisco oncologist was quoted as saying  that "fortunately, this is early stage localized prostate cancer, which is being treated with a short course of conventional radiotherapy. The prognosis is excellent, and there are not expected to be any significant side effects. " The statement also said that  Brown's treatment should end the week of Jan. 7 and that he was “continuing a full work schedule.” We called three physicians to learn more about this cancer, its treatment and prognosis.
NEWS
May 1, 2012 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Brachytherapy is an increasingly popular option for women with early-stage breast cancer. After a lumpectomy to remove abnormal tissue, doctors insert either a series of tubes or a catheter attached to a small balloon into the breast. A radioactive source is then delivered to the surgical site, where it can kill off any remaining cancer cells within about 1 centimeter. After five days of treatment, the tubes or catheter can be removed. As this site from UCLA's Department of Radiation Oncology explains, brachytherapy allows doctors to irradiate the breast “from the inside out,” unlike the traditional method of applying radiation to the entire breast with an external beam.
HEALTH
April 17, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II / For the Booster Shots blog
Warren Buffett announced Tuesday that he has stage 1 prostate cancer and that doctors have begun treating it with radiation. Buffett is 81 and, at that age, it would be more surprising if he didn't have it. A full 80% of men older than 80 have some form of prostate cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute, but many or even most of them do not know it. Even if they do know, in many cases, the tumor is progressing so slowly that it doesn't need...
HEALTH
January 9, 2012 | By Melissa T. Shultz, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I like to help people. Tell me what's wrong, and I'll take on anyone and anything to try to make it better. Then news came about a boy, and everything changed. A family in our community lost their teenage son when he fell from the fifth-floor balcony of his apartment at college. He was smart, kind and gregarious - a boy with a twin brother, a kid brother and loving parents. One night he leaned too far over his balcony in the darkness and plummeted to his death. Everyone wanted to know the particulars - whether he was drunk or did it purposefully, who was with him, whether it could have been prevented.
HEALTH
October 3, 2011 | By Monica B. Morris, Special to the Los Angeles Times
There is dancing today in the radiation waiting room. Upright and youthful-looking despite his lined face, the smiling man jitterbugs with any woman who accepts his courteously offered hand. The music he provides by way of a small radio, turned low so as not to disturb those who would rather be quiet as they wait for their treatments. Patients are used to him, enjoying the way he expresses his love of life in his movements to the music of the '50s and '60s — his day. Radiation treatments generally are given five days a week for several weeks, so people get to know one another while they're waiting for their treatment, coming as they do at much the same hour each day. They pass through here by the dozens to the seven treatment rooms, the procedure itself taking mere seconds.
NEWS
June 27, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Radiation after a mastectomy for advanced breast cancer is part of the standard treatment guidelines. But more than a decade after the lifesaving value of radiation was confirmed, about half of all women who should get radiation therapy aren't getting it, researchers reported Monday. In the mid-1990s, several studies confirmed that mastectomy patients with advanced breast cancer have better outcomes if they undergo radiation after surgery. Initially, the medical community seemed to pay attention to the findings.
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