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Radiation

SCIENCE
February 17, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Radiation from the largest solar flare in four years is expected to reach the Earth Thursday and Friday, potentially interfering with communication and navigation satellites and disrupting ground-based communication networks and power grids. The rain of charged particles from the so-called coronal mass ejections, or CMEs, should also enhance the northern lights, also known as the Aurora Borealis, making them both more prominent and visible farther south, perhaps even into the northern tier of the United States, experts said.
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NEWS
September 28, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After hearing emotional appeals to right "one of the great wrongs that we Americans committed against our own citizens," the House gave final congressional approval Thursday to legislation that compensates radiation victims of nuclear weapons testing and uranium mining.
SCIENCE
March 17, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
With reports that a radiation plume from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant could reach Southern California as soon as Friday, worried citizens have been hoarding potassium iodide pills, wondering if it's OK to go outside and otherwise fretting over an invisible, and somewhat unpredictable, threat. But all that worrying might cause more harm than the radiation itself, experts say. Here are some answers to common concerns. How much radiation do scientists think will arrive here?
SCIENCE
June 8, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
A single dose of radiation during breast cancer surgery is as effective as three to six weeks of daily post-operative radiation for many women with early stage breast cancer, according to the first results from an ongoing study of more than 2,000 women. Most women undergoing a lumpectomy now have to visit a radiation center every weekday for at least three weeks following their surgery, a treatment that is, at best, inconvenient for working women and, at worst, debilitating for older ones.
NEWS
August 4, 2010
If people weren't afraid of CT scans before now, it might just be a matter of time until they are. Or perhaps until lawmakers take matters into their own hands. L.A. Times staff writer Alan Zarembo wrote Tuesday of local hospitals that said they were simply following the manufacturer's recommendations: " Two More Hospitals Report CT Scan Radiation Overdoses ." Judith Graham wrote recently in the Chicago Tribune about attempts to protect children from excess radiation: " Clamping Down on CT Scans for Kids ."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2010 | By Alan Zarembo, Los Angeles Times
Two California hospitals where patients were exposed to excessive levels of radiation during CT scans had programmed their scanners according to the manufacturer's specifications, officials at both hospitals said. Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center and Bakersfield Memorial Hospital are the latest additions to a list of California hospitals where overdoses occurred during CT brain perfusion scans. In both cases, the scanner in question was made by Toshiba. "We called Toshiba to give us the protocol," said Dr. Stephanie Hall, the chief medical officer at County-USC, where two patients received overdoses shortly after the hospital began doing the scans last fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2009 | Alan Zarembo
More than 200 patients at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center were inappropriately exposed to high doses of radiation from CT brain scans used to diagnose strokes, hospital officials told The Times on Friday. About 40% of the patients lost patches of hair as a result of the overdoses, a hospital spokesman said. Even so, the overdoses went undetected for 18 months as patients received eight times the dose normally delivered in the procedure, raising questions about why it took Cedars-Sinai so long to notice that something was wrong.
SCIENCE
April 2, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Treating prostate cancer with radiation significantly increases the risk of developing colon cancer, researchers from the University of Minnesota reported this week in the journal Gastroenterology. Using federal data from 1973 to 1994, the researchers identified 30,552 men who received radiation treatment; 1,437 developed colorectal cancer, about 70% more than expected. The team noted that radiation treatment is highly effective for prostate cancer and should not be abandoned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The Port of San Francisco has become the first West Coast seaport to install monitors that screen imported cargo for radiation emanating from nuclear devices, such as dirty bombs. Officials from U.S. Customs and Border Protection said they plan to install the radiation portal monitors at all seaports, land border ports and airports across the country. The two monitors, operated by customs officers, screen trucks as they exit the pier and turn red if they detect radiation.
SCIENCE
March 15, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
NASA's Mars Odyssey spacecraft has confirmed that the radiation on Mars is so intense that it could endanger astronauts sent to explore the Red Planet, scientists said. Mars is bombarded by radiation from the galaxy at large, as well as by periodic bursts from the sun. The radiation would expose astronauts in orbit to an effective dose 2.5 times greater than that received in low Earth orbit. A three-year mission would expose astronauts to the career-long safety limit.
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