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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2009 | Alan Zarembo
More than 200 patients at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center were inappropriately exposed to high doses of radiation from CT brain scans used to diagnose strokes, hospital officials told The Times on Friday. About 40% of the patients lost patches of hair as a result of the overdoses, a hospital spokesman said. Even so, the overdoses went undetected for 18 months as patients received eight times the dose normally delivered in the procedure, raising questions about why it took Cedars-Sinai so long to notice that something was wrong.
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NEWS
September 28, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After hearing emotional appeals to right "one of the great wrongs that we Americans committed against our own citizens," the House gave final congressional approval Thursday to legislation that compensates radiation victims of nuclear weapons testing and uranium mining.
SCIENCE
March 17, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
With reports that a radiation plume from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant could reach Southern California as soon as Friday, worried citizens have been hoarding potassium iodide pills, wondering if it's OK to go outside and otherwise fretting over an invisible, and somewhat unpredictable, threat. But all that worrying might cause more harm than the radiation itself, experts say. Here are some answers to common concerns. How much radiation do scientists think will arrive here?
NEWS
August 4, 2010
If people weren't afraid of CT scans before now, it might just be a matter of time until they are. Or perhaps until lawmakers take matters into their own hands. L.A. Times staff writer Alan Zarembo wrote Tuesday of local hospitals that said they were simply following the manufacturer's recommendations: " Two More Hospitals Report CT Scan Radiation Overdoses ." Judith Graham wrote recently in the Chicago Tribune about attempts to protect children from excess radiation: " Clamping Down on CT Scans for Kids ."
WORLD
March 18, 2011 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
A minuscule amount of radiation from the stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactor in Japan was detected in Sacramento but at such a low level that it posed no threat to human health, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said Friday afternoon. One station in Sacramento detected "minuscule quantities" of a radioactive isotope, xenon-133, that scientists said they believed came from the reactors at the stricken Fukushima plant. Photos: In Japan, life amid crisis But the level detected would result in a "dose rate approximately one-millionth of the dose rate that a person normally receives from rocks, bricks, the sun and other natural sources," according to an EPA statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2010 | By Alan Zarembo, Los Angeles Times
Two California hospitals where patients were exposed to excessive levels of radiation during CT scans had programmed their scanners according to the manufacturer's specifications, officials at both hospitals said. Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center and Bakersfield Memorial Hospital are the latest additions to a list of California hospitals where overdoses occurred during CT brain perfusion scans. In both cases, the scanner in question was made by Toshiba. "We called Toshiba to give us the protocol," said Dr. Stephanie Hall, the chief medical officer at County-USC, where two patients received overdoses shortly after the hospital began doing the scans last fall.
WORLD
March 15, 2011
Everyone is exposed to some radiation. It's the level of exposure that determines whether there's any harmful effect. But how much radiation is a lot? Here are a few numbers for comparison. (A microsievert is a unit that measures the biological effects of radiation.) Limit on whole-body exposure for a radiation worker for one year: 50,000 microsieverts One year's worth of exposure to natural radiation from soil, cosmic rays and other sources: 3,000 microsieverts One chest X-ray: 100 microsieverts One dental X-ray: 40-150 microsieverts One mammogram: 700 microsieverts CT scan (abdomen)
SCIENCE
April 2, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Treating prostate cancer with radiation significantly increases the risk of developing colon cancer, researchers from the University of Minnesota reported this week in the journal Gastroenterology. Using federal data from 1973 to 1994, the researchers identified 30,552 men who received radiation treatment; 1,437 developed colorectal cancer, about 70% more than expected. The team noted that radiation treatment is highly effective for prostate cancer and should not be abandoned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The Port of San Francisco has become the first West Coast seaport to install monitors that screen imported cargo for radiation emanating from nuclear devices, such as dirty bombs. Officials from U.S. Customs and Border Protection said they plan to install the radiation portal monitors at all seaports, land border ports and airports across the country. The two monitors, operated by customs officers, screen trucks as they exit the pier and turn red if they detect radiation.
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