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Radiation

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2012 | From a Times staff writer
Wallace L.W. Sargent, a Caltech astrophysicist known for his observations of black holes, quasars and other celestial objects at the farthest reaches of the universe, died Oct. 29 at the USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center in Los Angeles, according to a Caltech spokesman. He was 77 and had been battling prostate cancer. A professor emeritus of astronomy, Sargent arrived at Caltech from his native Britain in 1959 and spent three years as a research fellow. He returned to the university in 1966 as an assistant professor and became a full professor in 1971.
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SCIENCE
August 2, 2012 | By Jon Bardin, Los Angeles Times
If you're still skeptical that a tan can be dangerous, consider this: Scientists have found that wild fish are getting skin cancer from ultraviolet radiation. Approximately 15% of coral trout inAustralia'sGreat Barrier Reef had cancerous lesions on their scales. In that regard, they resemble Australians who live on land - 2 in 3 people who live down under will be diagnosed with skin cancer before the age of 70, the highest rate in the world. It's probably no coincidence that Australia is under the Earth's biggest hole in the ozone layer.
HEALTH
June 30, 2012
The sun does lots of cool stuff. We couldn't live on Earth without it. But the havoc it wreaks with our skin is not so hot. The culprit is ultraviolet, or UV, radiation, which can actually be very useful in fluorescent lighting and sterilizing medical equipment, or by stimulating our bodies to make vitamin D. But a little goes a long way, and overexposure to UV radiation is a major cause of skin cancer. (It's classified as a human carcinogen by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the World Health Organization.)
BUSINESS
June 15, 2012 | By Laura Hautala
Car Land's best-reviewed ride -- Radiator Springs Racers -- broke down on opening morning of the newest land at the Disney California Adventure park. Riders stranded when the ride stopped Friday were escorted away safely, and workers -- appropriately wearing mechanics' costumes -- walked  onto the tracks to inspect. The ride got going again a little more than an hour after halting. Debbie Heaton, 41, emerged from it, saying it was worth the wait -- “Because it was racing!
BUSINESS
June 15, 2012 | Bloomberg News
The U.S. Federal Communications Commission plans to ask whether its standards protect humans from mobile-phone radiation, a question it hasn't posed in 15 years, as people use smartphones for longer, more frequent calls. Julius Genachowski, the agency's chairman, is to ask fellow commissioners today to approve a notice commencing a formal inquiry, Tammy Sun, a spokeswoman for the agency, said in an emailed statement. The notice won't propose rules, Sun said. "Our action today is a routine review of our standards," Sun said.
NEWS
June 13, 2012 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Radiator Springs Racers is the kind of ride nobody but Disney can do. The new $200 million attraction in the 12-acre Cars Land at Disney California Adventure brings to bear all the theme park giant's strengths and abilities: immersive storytelling, detailed thematic scenery, life-like animatronic characters and the illusion of speed and thrill. PHOTOS:   Buena Vista Street  |  Cars Land  |  Radiator Springs Racers  |  Mater's Junkyard Jamboree  |  Luigi's Flying Tires  |  Carsland origins The E-ticket ride is so amazing that Disney may need to come up with a new attraction designation: F-ticket.
SCIENCE
June 12, 2012 | By Jon Bardin, Los Angeles Times
The use of CTs, MRIs and other advanced medical imaging tests has soared over the last 15 years, according to new research that raises questions about whether the benefits of all these scans outweigh the potential risks from radiation exposure and costs to the healthcare system. An examination of data from patients enrolled in six large health maintenance organizations found that doctors ordered CT scans at a rate of 149 tests per 1,000 patients in 2010, nearly triple the rate of 52 scans per 1,000 patients in 1996.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
Full-body scanners used for security screening at the nation's airports do not expose passengers to dangerous levels of radiation, according to a new independent analysis of the security devices. The study by the Marquette University College of Engineering concluded that radiation from so-called backscatter scanners passes beyond a passenger's skin to reach 29 different organs - including the heart and brain. But the radiation levels are considerably lower than those of otherX-ray procedures such as mammograms, the study said.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2012 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
Full-body scanners used for security screening at the nation's airports do not expose passengers to dangerous levels of radiation, according to a new independent analysis of the devices. The study by the Marquette University College of Engineering concluded that radiation from so-called backscatter scanners passes beyond a passenger's skin to reach 29 organs - including the heart and brain. But the radiation levels are considerably lower than those of otherX-ray procedures such as mammograms, the study said.
SCIENCE
June 4, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Radioactive carbon-14 found in rings of Japanese cedar trees shows that Earth had a major influx of cosmic rays about 1,230 years ago, but researchers can find no obvious source for the increase. The most likely sources would have been either a major eruption on the surface of the sun or a nearby supernova, either of which could have showered the Earth's atmosphere with highly energetic radiation, but historical records show no evidence of such an event. For the time being, its cause will have to remain a mystery, Japanese researchers reported Sunday in the online version of the journal Nature.
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